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Research

Honors Theses and Independent Research

Anthropology majors have many opportunities to pursue independent research under the guidance of faculty advisers and to present their findings to audiences within the University and beyond. The department’s Undergraduate Research Grant has, since 2009, provided funding for students to pursue original research, and many grantees write honor’s theses or independent studies based on the data they collected through their funded research project. The Advanced Topic Seminar is also an ideal avenue for students to pursue independent research in the course of fulfilling their anthropology major requirements. Students must apply for admission to the Honors program in the spring of their junior year. More information may be found on the Honors Program page.

Here are some examples of recently completed Honors Theses:

2013

Paige Hammond, “Who Owns the Female Body? Exploring Cross-Cultural Tensions Over Women’s Bodies”

Alana Valvo, “Evangelical Engagement in Modernity: The Reciprocity and Competition of American Evangelical Culture and American Secular Culture”

Anaise Williams, “Understanding Pregnancy in Northeastern Thailand: Negotiating Local Beliefs and Western Biomedicine” 

2012

Mara Lynn Chinelli, “Witnessing Palestinian Life: Mimetics, Prosthetics, and Globalizing Local Political Voices”

Sorcha H. Dundas, “Green Business and American Dahl: Refugee Resettlement and Integration in Burlington, Vermont”

Alysha N. Edwards, “Knowledgeable Transactions: The Anthropology of Bureaucracy at the European Parliament”

Christine M. Rose, “Teaching a Lesson: Discourses of Empowerment and the Development of “Future Leaders” in Non-Governmental Education Initiatives in Africa”

2011

Margaret G. Ball, “Eagle and Condor in the Same Skies? A Paradoxical Sustainability Narrative in New York's Hydrofracking Debate”

Jessalyn Ballerano, “Contracted Birth: Limited Agency, Authoritative Knowledge and Modern Meanings of Choice in American Reproduction”

Victoria M. Massie, “(Re)Connection: Networking African American Identity in Genetic Ancestry Testing”

2010

Johanna K. Fischer, “Negotiating Disgrace: Masculinity and Afrikaner Nationalism in Post- Apartheid South Africa”

Rachel R. Odhner, “Reclaiming Food Systems via a Transnational Peasant Politics: A Genealogy of the Food Sovereignty Movement in Ecuador”

2009

Miriam E. Moody, “In the Negev, the Nation Will be Tested: Education and Identity Among the Negev Bedouin in Israel”

Devin M. Opotzner, “Prisoners of Our Own Device: Local Nomads, Backpackers and Global Tourism in Dahab, Egypt”

Here are some recent projects funded by the Undergraduate Anthropology Research Grant:

2014

Alysha Alani, “Blessing and Burden: Negotiating the Hemodialysis Experience”

Jessica Nielsen, “The Development and Re-Integration of Youth in Post-Apartheid South Africa”

2013

Ramsey Ismail, “Precarious Japan: Youth Voices and the Grounds for New Subjectivities”

Anaise Williams, “Understanding Pregnancy in Northeastern Thailand: Negotiating Local Beliefs and Western Biomedicine”

2012

Sorcha H. Dundas, “Green Business and American Dahl: Refugee Resettlement and Integration in Burlington, Vermont”

Byron R. Miller, “T Shaped Employees: The Changing Nature of Employment and Hierarchy in Tech Workspaces”

2011

Margaret G. Ball, “Eagle and Condor in the Same Skies? A Paradoxical Sustainability Narrative in New York's Hydrofracking Debate”

Mara Lynn Chinelli, “Witnessing Palestinian Life: Mimetics, Prosthetics and Globalizing Local Political Voices”

2010

Daniel A. Brooks, “Canned Style: The Evolution of FUA and Meanings of Graffiti in Rochester, New York” (cannedstyle.wordpress.com)