University of Rochester

Michael C. Fisher

PhD Candidate, ABD

Field: American History

Major Fields: Recent American History, American Cultural and Intellectual History

Minor Fields: Modernism and Modernity, 19th Century European Intellectual History

Research Interests: My dissertation focuses on the ways in which Americans have re-conceptualized the idea of the self since World War II. Drawing on a host of cultural practices, products, texts, and figures that appeared in America between 1945-1980, I examine a pattern of visions and "re-envisionings" that center on the self's content, boundaries, and degree of autonomy.

Adviser: Joan Shelley Rubin

Dissertation: "American Re-envisionings of the Self"

Education:
BA, History, UC Davis, 2006

Publications/Presentations:

  • “The Cultural Politics of Resonance: Teaching in the Classrooms of the Early Twenty-First Century.” Literature, Politics, Aesthetics: Jacques Rancière and the Politics of A-Disciplinarity, Binghamton University, March 2014.
  • “Is It Necessary to Become Less Consumerist?” in Kurt Finsterbusch, Ed., Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Social Issues (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2014).
  • “Self-Extension, Consciousness Expansion, and the Road to Altamont.” Historians Are Writers! History Slam, Cornell University, May 2013.
  • “Citizenship as ‘Facebookization’: Consumer-Selfhood on the Internet.” Citizenship and Its Discontents: Belonging in a Global World Conference, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, March 2013.
  • Review of Inger Stole’s Advertising at War: Business, Consumers, and Government in the 1940s (2012), Consumption Markets & Culture, 3/18/13.
  • “Historians and Their Problems,” Full Stop Magazine, 2/26/13.
  • “Socialization to What?” a review of Paul Goodman’s Growing up Absurd (2012), Full Stop Magazine, 10/17/12.
  • Co-author with Jonathan Lee, Paul Goodman Changed My Life study guide (Zeitgeist Films, 2012).
  • “Goods Aplenty: Against Thrift and the Question, ‘What for?’” a review of James Livingston’s Against Thrift (2011), The Blog of the Society for U.S. Intellectual History, 3/22/12.
  • “The Road From Modernity: The Two Paths of James and Nietzsche.” Exchanges and Returns: The Crossroads of Interaction Graduate Conference, Syracuse University, March 2012.
  • “Fully-Licensed Subjectivity and the End of Modernity.” Image, Truth, and Distortion Graduate Conference, University of Rochester, February 2012.
  • Paul Goodman Changed My Life panel participant. Dryden Theater, Rochester, New York, February 2012.
  • “The (Moral) Problem of Modernity.” Humanities Caucus panel, University of Rochester, January 2012.
  • Paul Goodman Changed My Life panel participant. United States Intellectual History Conference, City University of New York, November 2011.
  • Introduction to New Reformation: Notes of A Neolithic Conservative by Paul Goodman (Oakland: PM Press, 2010).
  • "The Coming of the Modern: How Tocqueville and Kierkegaard Envisioned the Ethos of their Age." Second-Year Conference, University of Rochester, April 2010.
  • "A 'Religious Crisis': Paul Goodman and the Necessary New Reformation." The Great Rehearsal? World Revolutions of 1968 Conference, University of San Francisco, September 2008.

Teaching Experience:

  • WRT 105: In the Shadow of Facebook: The Internet and American Culture, Instructor, University of Rochester, Fall 2013 and Spring 2014
  • WRT 105: Digital Culture and Counterculture, Instructor, University of Rochester, Fall 2012 and Spring 2013
  • WRT 105: The Individual and American Culture, Instructor, University of Rochester, Fall 2011 and Spring 2012
  • WRT 105: The Individual and American Culture, Instructor, University of Rochester, Fall 2010 and Spring 2011
  • HIS 148: Recent America, 1945-1989, Teaching Assistant for Dr. Robert Westbrook, University of Rochester, Spring 2010
  • HIS 147: Industrial America, 1865-1929, Teaching Assistant for Dr. Daniel Borus, University of Rochester, Fall 2009

Honors:

  • 2012 David A. Parker Memorial Prize, “to the graduate student in the PhD program who best exemplifies David Parker’s qualities of historical imagination and dedication to learning.”
  • 2011 Lina and A. William Salomone Prize, for “outstanding work in European cultural and intellectual history”
  • 2010 Wilson Coates Book Prize, for Second Year Paper “The Coming of the Modern: How Tocqueville and Kierkegaard Envisioned the Ethos of their Age”
  • 2006 High Honors, for Honors Thesis in History, “Paul Goodman: a ‘Neolithic Conservative’ in Search of Social Revolution,” UC Davis