Student FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions For Students Regarding Conduct Meetings:

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  1. I was "written up" by a Resident Assistant (RA) or Public Safety.  What happens next?
  2. What if I do not show up for my conduct meeting?
  3. Who is present at a conduct meeting?
  4. Can I bring a lawyer to my conduct meeting?
  5. Can I bring a parent and/or guardian to my conduct meeting?
  6. If I am found responsible for violating the Standards of Student Conduct, what is the likely outcome?
  7. What is the standard of proof used at the University in conduct cases?
  8. If I am found responsible, will it be on my transcript?
  9. Who can view my disciplinary record?
  10. Will graduate schools (law schools, medical schools, etc.) or employers find out my disciplinary record?
  11. Can I appeal a decision by the judicial officer or hearing board?
  12. How long are disciplinary records kept by your office?
  13. Can I make copies of what is in my disciplinary file?

Frequently Asked Questions For Students Regarding The Conduct Process:

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  1. Who is involved in the conduct process?
  2. What is a conduct hearing?
  3. What is a conduct meeting?
  4. What is restorative justice? 

Frequently Asked Questions For Students Regarding Conduct Hearings:

Jump to:

  1. Can I postpone my conduct hearing?
  2. What if I do not show up for my conduct hearing?
  3. What is the difference between an All Campus Judicial Council hearing board and an Administrative Conduct Hearing?
  4. Who is present at a Conduct Hearing?
  5. Can I bring a lawyer to my conduct hearing?
  6. Can I bring a parent and/or guardian to my conduct hearing?
  7. How can I find out specifics about the conduct process and what to expect during the conduct hearing?
  8. Can I review my file prior to the conduct hearing?
  9. What is the standard of proof used during conduct hearings?
  10. If I am found responsible for violating the Standards of Student Conduct, what is a likely outcome?
  11. Can I appeal a decision by the hearing officer or hearing board?

 

 

Conduct Meetings

1) I was written up by a Resident Assistant (RA) or Public Safety, what happens next?

All incident reports are reviewed by the Center for Student Conflict Management (CSCM) staff to determine if a violation of the Standards of Student Conduct may have occurred. If it is believed that a violation may have occurred, you will be sent an e-mail letting you know that you need to meet with either an Area Coordinator or Resident Director (who is a professional staff member in Residential Life) or a staff member in the CSCM. This meeting will be a chance for you to share your perspective of the incident and discuss options for moving forward.

2) What if I do not show up for my Conduct Meeting?

If you are scheduled for a conduct meeting and do not appear, a conduct hearing may be scheduled.

3) Who is present at a Conduct Meeting?

During a conduct meeting only you and the judicial officer (the judicial officer is either a Residential Life or CSCM staff member) will meet to discuss the incident.

4) Can I bring a lawyer to my conduct meeting?

No. The disciplinary process at the University of Rochester is an educational process, not a legal process, therefore attorneys are not permitted in our disciplinary process.

5) Can I bring a parent and/or guardian to my conduct meeting?

Parent(s) and/or guardian(s) are not permitted in the conduct meeting itself, however, if you would like to have a meeting with your parent and the conduct officer, you can request that one be scheduled after your conduct meeting.

6) If I am found responsible for violating the Standards of Student Conduct, what is the likely outcome?

Students found responsible for violating policies will be given sanctions designed to help them learn from incident. As each student and incident is unique, it is often difficult to predict exactly what sanctions will be issued in your particular situation until after your conduct meeting.

View a list of possible sanctions for each Standards of Student Conduct violation »»

7) What is the standard of proof used at the University in their conduct cases?

At the University of Rochester, we use a preponderance of the evidence as the standard of proof (51% or more likely than not).

8) If I’m found responsible, will it be on my transcript?

Generally, notations regarding conduct are not made on students’ transcripts. There are, however, certain circumstances under which a notation will be place on a transcript. These include, but are not limited to, cases where a student has been suspended or expelled from the University or if a student leaves the University while conduct action is pending.

9) Who can view my disciplinary record?

Conduct records are protected under the Family Educational Right to Privacy Act (FERPA).  School officials will be given only information that they need to know. For example, some groups and organizations at the university will not allow students with certain conduct issues to participate. As a result, school officials associated with those groups will check the conduct record of participants. If anyone outside of the University (e.g. graduate school) requests information about your student’s conduct status, we will ask your student to sign a release of information form authorizing the University to share information with that 3rd party. The University only considers incidents that result in a response of probation or above to be "disciplinary incidents" and therefore will not disclose incidents resulting in solely educational responses, formal letters of warning, or informal letters of warning to those requesting information regarding inappropriate conduct. Incidents that result in a response below disciplinary probation (including an educational program or project, formal letter or warning or informal letter of warning) are not considered formal disciplinary action by the university.

View the FERPA statement »»

10) Will graduate schools (law schools, medical schools, etc.) or employers find out my disciplinary record?

Please refer to question #9.

11) Can I appeal a decision by the judicial officer or hearing board?

Yes. You may appeal a decision of a judicial officer or hearing board. The appeal must be made in writing within 7 days from the date of the sanction letter to the appropriate school official (typically the Dean of Students). The school official will review all relevant material and make a determination based on those materials.

View detailed information about the appeals process »»

12) How long are disciplinary records kept by your office?

Disciplinary records are kept for 7 years. Disciplinary files are typically destroyed sometime during the first June that follows 7 year anniversary of the incident.

13) Can I make copies of what is in my disciplinary file?

No. You are not allowed to make copies or take any documents from our office. You can, however, take notes from your file or request a summary of disciplinary infractions in your file. If you would like to request a summary or set up a time to take notes from your file you must contact the Center for Student Conflict Management by calling 585-275-4085 or e-mailing conflict.management@rochester.edu.

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Conduct Process

1) Who is involved in the conduct process? 

 The Office of Residential Life (ResLife), The Center for Student Conflict Management (CSCM), The All Campus Judicial Council (ACJC), and The Administrative Hearing Board can all be involved in the conduct process. Each case is unique and therefore requires a unique response. Which of these groups responds is determined on a case-by-case basis.  

2) What is a Conduct Meeting? 

A conduct meeting is scheduled with a student after an incident report is reviewed and a violation of the Standards of Student Conduct is believed to have occurred. A conduct meeting is a one on one conversation between the student and a member of the CSCM or ResLife. At this meeting the student has a chance to discuss the incident from their perspective and discuss options for repairing the damage done to the community. 

3) What is a Conduct Hearing? 

A conduct hearing is a meeting between a student and an Administrative Hearing Board. The Administrative Hearing Board is made up of staff and administrators throughout the university. All members of the Administrative Hearing Board have been trained in the conduct process. The Administrative Hearing Board is comprised of three members: one chair and two officers. 

 4) What is restorative justice?

 The CSCM focuses on restorative justice in response to student conduct issues. Restorative justice identifies that a violation of the Standards of Student Conduct harms the community. Any student found to have violated the Standards of Student Conduct will work with the CSCM wherever possible to repair the damage that was done to the community through their actions. 


 

 

Conduct hearings

1) Can I postpone my conduct hearing?

If there is an academically related commitment (e.g. test, midterm, etc.), your hearing may be postponed at the discretion of the CSCM staff member. You should inform the staff member immediately if a conflict does arise.

2) What if I do not show up for my hearing?

If you are scheduled for a conduct hearing and do not appear, the conduct hearing will be held in your absence and a decision will be made about your responsibility for the alleged infraction. You will then be contacted via e-mail with the conduct hearing results.

3) What is the difference between the All Campus Judicial Council hearing board and the Administrative Hearing Board?

The All-Campus Judicial Council (ACJC) is a branch of the Students' Association government that serves both as the SA's highest court and as a discipline hearing panel authorized by the University to handle violations of the Standards of Student Conduct. ACJC provides a true jury of one’s peers: students determine whether the accused student or student group is responsible for the alleged violations and students recommend appropriate sanctions for those found responsible to the Center for Student Conflict Management.

The ACJC is comprised of a chief justice, an associate chief justice and nine associate justices.

The Administrative Hearing Board is made of up staff and administrators throughout the University. All of the Administrative Hearing Board members have been trained in the hearing process. The Administrative Hearing Board is made up of three members: one hearing chair and two hearing officers. 

Students are permitted to express a preference regarding which board they would like to hear their case, however, the final determination will be made by the CSCM staff.

4) Who is present at a Conduct Hearing?

If you choose a Conduct Hearing, in addition to yourself, others present in the room will include your advisor, if you have selected one, any pertinent witnesses, and three board members.

If your hearing is an ACJC hearing, in addition to yourself, others present in the room will include your advisor, if you have selected one, any pertinent witnesses, and somewhere between 3-12 board members who are all undergraduate students. Also in the room will be the ACJC advisor, who is a faculty or staff member that provides guidance to ACJC, but has no authority in determining whether a student is responsible.

5) Can I bring a lawyer to my Conduct Hearing?

No. The disciplinary process at the University of Rochester is an educational process, not a legal process, therefore attorneys are not permitted in our disciplinary process.

6) Can I bring a parent and/or guardian to my hearing?

No. A parent and/or guardian will not be allowed at the conduct conversation.

7) How can I find out specifics about the Conduct Hearing process and what to expect during the Conduct Hearing?

You may arrange a pre-conduct conference with a CSCM staff member (585) 275-4085. It is your responsibility to schedule this meeting if you wish to have one.

8) Can I review my file prior to the Conduct Hearing?

Yes. You may review your file whenever the Center for Student Conflict Management is open (Monday through Friday from 9am-5pm). You are encouraged to make an appointment ahead of time to ensure that a staff member is present in case you have any questions.

9) What is the standard of proof used during hearings?

At the University of Rochester we use a preponderance of the evidence as the standard of proof (51% or more likely than not).

10) If I am found responsible for violating the code of conduct what is a likely outcome?

Students found responsible for violating policies will be given sanctions designed to help them learn from incident. As each student and incident is unique it is often difficult to predict exactly what sanctions will be issued in your particular situation until after your conduct meeting.

View a list of possible sanctions for each conduct code violation »»

11) Can I appeal a decision by the conduct officer or hearing board?

Yes. You may appeal a decision of a conduct officer or hearing board. The appeal must be made in writing within 7 days from the date of the sanction letter to the appropriate school official (typically the Dean of Students). The school official will review all relevant material and make a determination based on that.

View detailed information about the appeals process »»

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