Department of English

People

Katherine Mannheimer

Research Interests

Katherine Mannheimer studies Restoration and eighteenth-century literature, with an emphasis on print culture, book history, and histories of reading. Her published work has focused on such topics as the use of page design in eighteenth-century satire; the ways in which early modern culture understood the relationship between gender and the readerly imagination; the tension between print technologies and pastoralism in John Gay’s poetry; and the markings that Alexander Pope left behind in his personal copy of Ben Jonson’sWorks. Her first book, Print, Visuality, and Gender in Eighteenth-Century Satire: "The Scope in Ev’ry Page,"argues that the Augustans used typography as a kind of pedagogical tool, training their readers in how to see and read. Her current project examines the ways in which reading is depicted on the late-seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century stage.

Selected Publications

  • Print, Visuality, and Gender in Eighteenth-Century Satire: "The Scope in Ev'ry Page," Routledge 2011
  • "Anatomizing Print's Perils: Augustan Satire's Textual Bodies," in Seeing Satire, ed. Kelly Malone and Elizabeth Mansfield, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, forthcoming 2012
  • "'Press Acts': Print Technology and the Pastoral Body in John Gay's The What D'Ye Call It," in Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 11.2 (2011)
  • "Celestial Bodies: Gender and the Spectacle of Readerly Rapture in Aphra Behn's Emperor of the Moon," in Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700 35.1 (2011)
  • "The Scriblerian Stage and Page: Three Hours After Marriage, Pope's 'Minor' Poems, and the Problem of Genre-History," in Comparative Drama 3.1 (2009)
  • "Echoes of Sound and Sense: Alexander Pope's Essay on Criticism and Ben Jonson's 'Eupheme,'" in Literary Imagination 10.2 (2008), 152-64
  • "Personhood, Poethood, and Pope: Johnson's Life of Pope and the Search for the Man Behind the Author," in Eighteenth-Century Studies 40.4 (2007), 631-49
  • "To the Letter: The Material Text as Space of Adjudication in Pope's First Satire of the Second Book of Horace," in Comparative Literature Studies 43.1-2 (2006), 1-18