Orientation

Advising Week

Registration Dates and Times for Spring 2017 Courses

It is once again time to register for classes. Please use the information below to prepare for registration by learning about majors, minors, clusters, courses, independent study, Undergraduate councils, and more! See the links below for department specific information on the best way to reach advising Faculty members on campus. If you need more assistance, please feel free to visit the College Center for Advising Services (CCAS) in 312 Lattimore.

Monday, October 31

9-11am, Peer Advising Pop Advising: Green Carpet Lounge in Hutch - Health Professions

10-11:30am, Business Advising Office Hour: in Carol Simon 2-211

12-2pm, Health Professions Pop Up Advising: in Gwen M. Green Career & Internship Center (4-200 Dewey Hall)

10am-12pm, ECE Professor Office Hour AdvisingProf Mark Bocko's Office

2-4pm, Mathematics Advising Pop Up: with Amanda Tucker in Hylan 818

2:30-3:30pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: in Gavett 208 - Chemistry Department 

5-6pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: in Gleason Library - Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department 

6:30-7:30PM, Peer Advising Pop Up: in Spurrier 106 - Dance 

Tuesday, November 1

        9-10:30am, Mathematics Advising: with Saul Lubkin in Hylan 705

        10-11am, Health Professions Advising Pop Up Advising: in Gwen M. Green Career & Internship Center (4-200 Dewey Hall)

        2-4pm, Mathematics Advising Pop Up: with Mark Herman in Hylan 808

        1-2pm, Peer Advising Pop Up, in Math Lounge on 9th floor of Hylan - Mathematics

        1-3:30pm, Business Advising Office Hour: in Carol Simon 2-211

1:30-2:30pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: in Georgen Atrium - Electrical Computer Engineering Department 

4-6pm, Peer Advising Pop Advising: Green Carpet Lounge in Hutch - Health Professions

5-6:30pm, PSC/IR Information Night: in Havens Lounge (4th floor Wilson Commons).

Wednesday, November 2

10am-2pm, Anthropology Pop Up Advising: in Anthropology Department Lounge, Lattimore 444A.

1-3:30pm, Business Advising Office Hour: in Carol Simon 2-211

        1-2:30pm, Mathematics Advising Pop Up: with Carl Mueller in Hylan 802

1-2pm, Health Professions Advising Pop Up Advising: in Gwen M. Green Career & Internship Center (4-200 Dewey Hall)

1-3pm, ECE Professor Office Hour Advising: Prof Roman Sobolewski's Office

2-4pm, Peer Advising Pop Advising: Green Carpet Lounge in Hutch - Health Professions

2-3pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: in Gleason Library- Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department 

2-4pm, American Studies Professor Rubin's Office Hours: in Rush Rhees Library 363

2:30-4:30pm, ECE Professor Office Hour Advising: Prof Mark Bocko's Office

3:40-4:40pm, Mathematics Advising Pop Up: with Naomi Jochnowitz in Hylan 1101

6:00-7:00pm, Peer Career Advisers Open Hours -Dewey 4-200 Gwen M. Green Career & Internship Center

Thursday, November 3

2- 3:30 p.m., History Dept Open House in Rush Rhees Library 362 -Learn about new courses and much more!

2-3pm, Health Professions Advising Pop Up Advising: in Gwen M. Green Career & Internship Center (4-200 Dewey Hall)

        2:30-4:30pm, ECE Professor Office Hour Advising: Prof Mark Bocko's Office

        4-5:30pm, Mathematics Advising Pop Up: with Kalyani Madhu in Hylan 815

        4-6pm, Peer Advising Pop Advising: Green Carpet Lounge in Hutch - Health Professions

        5:00-6:30PM, Peer Advising Pop Up: Spurrier 106 - Dance 

6-7pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: Gleason Library - Biology Department 

Friday, November 4      

        12:30-1pm, Modern Languages and Cultures Pre-Registration Party, on 4th floor Lattimore

        12:30-1:30pm, Peer Advising Pop Up, in Math Lounge on 9th floor of Hylan - Mathematics

        2-3pm, Health Professions Advising Pop Up Advising: in Gwen M. Green Career & Internship Center (4-200 Dewey Hall)         


Monday November 7, 2016—Registration begins:

Registration for the Spring 2017 Semester will occur between Monday, November 7th and Thursday, November 10th according to the following schedule:

The registration system closes for 15 minutes beginning at 4:45 p.m. and reopens to ALL students at 5 p.m. on 11/10.


College Center for Advising Services- all-day Walk-In hours:

Advising Week October 31 through November 2, 2017

Highlighting Academic Resources to help you be more successful here!

Follow the links below to information for department/program advising information:

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES / FREDERICK DOUGLASS INSTITUTE

http://www.rochester.edu/College/AAS
301 Morey Hall
585-276-5744

Professor Rubin's Office Hours: Wednesday, November 2, 2:00-4:00pm
Rush Rhees Library 363

****NEW COURSES*****

AAS 263: Archaeology of the African Diaspora

The course will examine the nature and culture of the African Diaspora as found on the African continent, Europe, the Americas and elsewhere. Among key issues on which the course will focus are variability, continuity and change in the cultures of different groups of Diasporan Africans, and relationships that are found between major environmental challenges as well as historical events such as the Islamic Jihads, Trans-Saharan Trade, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, colonialism, and Plantation Slavery in West Africa and the relocation and redistribution of African populations in Africa. A critical component of this class examines the historical, ethnographic, and archaeological research done in Africa, Europe, and the Americas to inform the student about theories and interpretations concerning the African Diaspora. The course will critically review the methodological and theoretical issues regarding religious beliefs and practices, foodways, identity, gender, the impact of race, and ethnicity on archaeological research designs, and the development of analyses and interpretations specific to an archaeology of the African Diaspora.


AAS 273: Ethnoarchaeology of Africa

Ethnoarchaeology is the ethnographic study of peoples for archaeological reasons, usually through the study of the material remains of a society. Ethnoarchaeology aids archaeologists in reconstructing ancient lifeways by studying the material and non-material traditions of modern societies. This course will examine ethnoarchaeological work in Africa that is sensitive to the daily realities of peoples’ lives while it simultaneously builds the types of knowledge necessary for ethnoarchaeology to meet its important cognitive role within archaeological research. Examples will be drawn from research with potters and consumers, iron smelters, pastoralists, artists, and ethno-pharmacologists in West Africa, Southern Africa, and Eastern Africa. The course will guide the student to understand what ethnoarchaeology is, and to acquire skills, which would enable her or him to practice it. Following a general discussion of its background, the student will be introduced to key concepts, theories, methods and techniques of the field. Lectures will be combined with class discussions of specific case studies. In addition, the student will be guided to conduct an independent research and prepare a term paper or report.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

http://www.asl.rochester.edu
116 Lattimore Hall
Voice/TTY 585-273-5165

Guillaume Chastel 585-286-2714, 116 Lattimore Hall

Office Hours: Wednesdays 10:00a.m. - 11:00a.m and Thursdays 9:00a.m. - 10:00a.m.

For additional information, contact thest program at asl@rochester.edu or call 273-5165.


ANTHROPOLOGY

http://www.rochester.edu/College/ant/
440 Lattimore Hall
585-275-8614

Open advising on Wednesday, November 2nd from 10am-2pm in the Anthropology Department Lounge, Lattimore 444A. Faculty will be available to answer questions about specific courses, clusters, and requirements for the major and minor.


ANT 288: The Social Construction of Whiteness

Whiteness is often taken to be a human norm. An unraced, default, invisible category. Fundamentally unmarked, and yet a marker of power, status, and privilege. It has been the standard against which all non-white ways of being have been rendered Other. But whiteness is not a given. It is a mutable and flexible category. What does it mean to be white? How does one (or how do many) become white? And how can one (or many) move in and out of whiteness? In this course, we will deconstruct whiteness through theoretical, historical, and ethnographic lenses. We will examine the historical processes by which a number of ethnic groups have become white, and we will interrogate the ways in which whiteness continues to be actively produced and enacted in contemporary discourse and social life.


ARCHAEOLOGY, TECHNOLOGY & HISTORICAL STRUCTURES

www.rochester.edu/college/ATHS

ATHS Mandatory Advising Session - Friday, November 4. In preparation for registering for the Spring 2017 semester, all ATHS students (majors and minors) must meet with Professor Perucchio, ATHS director, to review their program on Friday, November 4 from 9:00am-1:00pm in Hopeman 415 (Prof. Perucchio's office). This is a walk-in session, you don't need to reserve a time. Please contact Professor Perucchio in advance at rlp@me.rochester.edu to confirm that you will make this meeting.


ATH Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu<http://heather.morens@rochester.edu/>
585-276-5305

Office hours:
Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

Professor Renato Perucchio
ATH Program Director
rlp@me.rochester.edu<mailto:rlp@me.rochester.edu>

Office hours:

Tuesday, 11:00 am - noon; Thursday, 2:30 - 3:30 pm

For additional information, contact Heather Morens at heather.morens@rochester.edu

AAS 263: Archaeology of the African Diaspora
The course will examine the nature and culture of the African Diaspora as found on the African continent, Europe, the Americas and elsewhere. Among key issues on which the course will focus are variability, continuity and change in the cultures of different groups of Diasporan Africans, and relationships that are found between major environmental challenges as well as historical events such as the Islamic Jihads, Trans-Saharan Trade, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, colonialism, and Plantation Slavery in West Africa and the relocation and redistribution of African populations in Africa. A critical component of this class examines the historical, ethnographic, and archaeological research done in Africa, Europe, and the Americas to inform the student about theories and interpretations concerning the African Diaspora. The course will critically review the methodological and theoretical issues regarding religious beliefs and practices, foodways, identity, gender, the impact of race, and ethnicity on archaeological research designs, and the development of analyses and interpretations specific to an archaeology of the African Diaspora.

AAS 273: Ethnoarchaeology of Africa
Ethnoarchaeology is the ethnographic study of peoples for archaeological reasons, usually through the study of the material remains of a society. Ethnoarchaeology aids archaeologists in reconstructing ancient lifeways by studying the material and non-material traditions of modern societies. This course will examine ethnoarchaeological work in Africa that is sensitive to the daily realities of peoples’ lives while it simultaneously builds the types of knowledge necessary for ethnoarchaeology to meet its important cognitive role within archaeological research. Examples will be drawn from research with potters and consumers, iron smelters, pastoralists, artists, and ethno-pharmacologists in West Africa, Southern Africa, and Eastern Africa. The course will guide the student to understand what ethnoarchaeology is, and to acquire skills, which would enable her or him to practice it. Following a general discussion of its background, the student will be introduced to key concepts, theories, methods and techniques of the field. Lectures will be combined with class discussions of specific case studies. In addition, the student will be guided to conduct an independent research and prepare a term paper or report.

ART & ART HISTORY

http://www.rochester.edu/college/aah/
424 Morey Hall
585-275-9249

Stephanie Ashenfelder
Program Coordinator & Undergraduate Advisor, Studio Arts

Monday 10:30-2:00
Tuesday 11:00-2:00
Wednesday 10:30-2:00
Sage Art Center
by appointment.

Joan Saab

Faculty/Undergraduate Advisor
Available by appointment.
506A Morey Hall

Studio Art:

For Studio Art, please contact Allen Topolski, undergraduate advisor to schedule an appointment.

BIOLOGY & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/index.html

488 Hutchison

585-275-3850

Biology Pre-Major Advising Event:  Monday October 31st 12-2pm

Hutchison Hall Green Lounge

Thinking about majoring in biology?  Stop by and talk with Biology faculty and Peer Advisors  and get advice about what to register for next semester.  Pizza and drinks served.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY & MEDICINE

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/index.html

Freshman who are planning a BA in Biology (BIO), or a BS major in Biochemistry (BBC), Computational Biology (BCB), Cell and Developmental Biology (BCD), Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (BEB), Microbiology (BMB) or Molecular Genetics (BMG) may also visit the following website for tips on what courses to register for the fall semester of their sophomore year: http://www.rochester.edu/college/BIO/UPBM/FreshmanAdvising_TypicalSchedule.pdf.

Freshman who are planning a BS in Neuroscience (BNS) should enroll in NSC 201/201P Neurobiology with Lab during the fall semester of their sophomore year

 

Biological Sciences BA Major (BA BIO) Minor (BI)

Websites: BA BIOhttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bio.html

Bi:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bi.html

Academic Advisor: Danielle Presgraves, PhD

Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 478

Email: danielle.presgraves@rochester.edu

Phone:  (585) 275-3848

To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Presgraves directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

1   Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements

1   Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval

navigating the system please contact CCAS directly. For contact info visit URL:  http://www.rochester.edu/College/CCAS/contact.html.

 

BS in Biological Sciences – Cell & Developmental Biology (BS BCD)

Website:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bcd.html

Academic Advisor: David Lambert, PhD.

Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 344

Email: dlamber2@z.rochester.edu

Phone: (585) 273-2482)

To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Lambert directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

1   Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements

1   Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval

navigating the system please contact CCAS directly. For contact info visit URL:  http://www.rochester.edu/College/CCAS/contact.html.

 

BS in Biological Sciences Computational Biology Major (BS BCB) Minor (Bc)

Websites: BS BCB:   http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bcb.html

Bi:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bc.html

Academic Advisor: Amanda Larracuente, PhD


Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 343


Email: alarracu@bio.rochester.edu


Phone: (585) 273-1693


To schedule an appointment: Please email Dr. Larracuente directly
.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

1   Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements

1   Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval

navigating the system please contact CCAS directly. For contact info visit URL:  http://www.rochester.edu/College/CCAS/contact.html.

  

BS in Biological Sciences Ecology & Evolutionary Biology (BS BEB)

Website:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/beb-17.html

Academic Advisor: James Fry, PhD

Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 318

Email: james.fry@rochester.edu

Phone: (585) 275-7835

To schedule an appointment: Please email Dr. Fry directly to set-up an appointment.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

1   Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements

1   Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval

navigating the system please contact CCAS directly. For contact info visit URL:  http://www.rochester.edu/College/CCAS/contact.html.

 

BS Biological Sciences Molecular Genetics (BS BMG)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/College/BIO/UPBM/majors/upbmbsmg.htm

Academic Advisor: Elaine Sia, PhD

Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 332

Email: elaine.sia@rochester.edu

Phone: (585) 275-9275 To schedule an appointment: Please email Dr. Sia directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

1   Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements

1   Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval

navigating the system please contact CCAS directly. For contact info visit URL:  http://www.rochester.edu/College/CCAS/contact.html.

 

BS in Biological Sciences Biochemistry (BS BBC)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bbc.html

Academic Advisor: Elizabeth Grayhack, PhD

Office: Medical Center, Room 3-7415. Directions.

Email: elizabeth_grayhack@urmc.rochester.edu

Phone: (585) 275-2765

To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Grayhack directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

1   Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements

1   Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval

navigating the system please contact CCAS directly. For contact info visit URL:  http://www.rochester.edu/College/CCAS/contact.html.

  

BS in Biological Sciences Microbiology (BS BMB)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bmb.html

Academic Advisor: Jacques Robert, PhD

Office: Medical Center, MRBX Building, Room 2-11124. Directions.

Email: mailto:jacques_robert@urmc.rochester.edu

Phone: (585) 275-5359

To schedule an appointment: e-mail Dr. Robert directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

1   Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements

1   Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval

1   Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

 

BS in Biological Sciences Neuroscience (BS BNS)

Website:    http://www.sas.rochester.edu/bcs/neuro/index.html

Academic Advisor: Dr. Ben Hayden
Office: Meliora Hall, Room 309
Email:   benhayden@gmail.com
Phone: 276-4023 (x6-4023)
To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Hayden directly

Undergraduate Coordinator: Melinda Adelman
Office: Meliora Hall, Room 363
Email:   madelma2@ur.rochester.edu
Phone: 275-0541 (x5-0541)
To schedule an appointment: visit https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me

Peer Advisor: Katherine Harvey
Email: kharvey4@u.rochester.edu
Office Hours: Mondays 1:00-3:00 and Tuesdays 2:00-3:00 in CCAS (Lattimore 312)

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

Students interested in a BS in Neuroscience are welcome to meet with the Undergraduate Coordinator to create an academic plan.  Students who are preparing to declare the major must do this before being assigned to a faculty   advisor for the BNS track.  Visit https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me to view the Undergraduate Coordinator’s office hours and book an appointment. Extended office hours are available during the week preceding registration. For information about the BCS/Neuroscience Undergraduate Council, visit https://ccs.rochester.edu/organization/bcsneuroscienceundergraduatecouncil.

 

BRAIN & COGNITIVE SCIENCES

http://www.sas.rochester.edu/bcs/

Undergraduate Coordinator: Melinda Adelman
Office: Meliora Hall, Room 363
Email:   madelma2@ur.rochester.edu
Phone: 275-0541 (x5-0541)
To schedule an appointment: visit https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me

Peer Advisors:

Adriana Schoenhaut
Email: aschoenh@u.rochester.edu

Stephen Powell
Email: spowe12@u.rochester.edu

Students interested in Brain and Cognitive Sciences are welcome to meet with the Undergraduate Coordinator to create an academic plan.  Students who are preparing to declare the major must do this before being assigned to a faculty adviser in BCS.  Visit https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me to view the Undergraduate Coordinator’s office hours and book an appointment. Extended office hours are available during the week preceding registration.

Additionally, the BCS Peer Advisors will be holding walk-in hours in Meliora 247 at the following times:.

Friday, 10/28/16, 2:00-3:30
Thursday, 11/3/16, 4:00-6:00
Saturday, 11/5/16, 1:00-3:00

For information about the BCS/Neuroscience Undergraduate Council, visit http://ccc.rochester.edu/organization/bcsneuroscienceundergraduatecouncil

 

BARRY FLORESCUE UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAM

Business Program Academic Advisor

Hilary Tatar hillary.tatar@rochester.edu

Office hours: Monday 10:00am-11:30am
Tuesday/Wednesday, 1:00pm - 3:30pm

To learn about the Business major or Business minor, or to officially declare either program, visit Hillary Tatar's walk-in hours in the Undergraduate Business Program's office in Carol Simon 2-211

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

http://www.che.rochester.edu/
206 Gavett Hall
585-275-4041

The CHE department will have advising in Gavett 208 on:

Tues, 11/1, 2-4pm

Wed, 11/2, 12-2pm

CHEMISTRY

http://www.chem.rochester.edu/events/AdvisingWeek.php
404D Hutchison Hall
phone: 585-276-3663
email: ugradadm@chem.rochester.edu

Student's should feel free to stop by at the times listed below with any questions. 
No appointment is necessary. Student's are also encouraged to contact one of our Peer Advisors www.chem.rochester.edu/undergrad/peer.php for general assistance.

Friday April 1 -12:00-1:30pm Biology-Chemistry-Physics Peer Advising Event in the Green Carpet Lounge. Get questions answered about classes/research/summer/whatever! Stop by and chat with an adviser in any of the three departments. A great time to figure out all of your Natural Science questions.

Authorized Signatures for Forms:
 -  MAJOR/MINOR Declaration Forms:  All members of the Chemistry Undergraduate Studies Committee listed at: www.chem.rochester.edu/undergrad/committee.php.  

 -  TRANSFER of COURSE CREDIT Requests:  Prof. Josh Goodman, or email to ugadadm@chem.rochester.edu. 

Drop-In/Open Advising Hours:

Monday 10/31:

Tuesday 11/1:

Wednesday 11/2:

Thursday 11/3:

Friday 11/4:

For more information or to schedule an appointment please email the Undergraduate Program Administrator, at ugradadm@chem.rochester.edu.


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

****NEW COURSE*****

CAS 120 – Exploring Intercultural Competence: Preparation for the Global Citizen (4 Credits)

What is intercultural competence? What is intercultural communication? How does one become interculturally competent in their increasingly globalized lives? Intercultural competence provides the tools needed to interact with other cultures, socioeconomic statuses, political beliefs, racial and ethnic backgrounds, sexual orientations, gender expressions, gender identities, abilities, and religious affiliations. Learning with and by people of different backgrounds encourages collaboration and fosters innovation and creativity, thereby benefitting the entire community. This course will be interactive and discussion based. Discussions will include guest speakers, reading personal narratives, as well as using popular media. Assignments will encourage students to conduct research, create an intercultural activity, and interact with people by conducting interviews. This course culminates with a group project, allowing for integration of theory and practice.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

http://www.cs.rochester.edu
735 Computer Studies
585-275-4505

Advising meetings:

Advisors should be contacting you to inform you of their advising availability.  If you are unable to make the assigned time for your advisor, please contact him or her directly to set up an appointment to complete your advising forms. Once your advising form has been completed, your adviser will lift your hold so you can register.  No form - no lifted hold.

Other questions? Contact (Mrs.) Marty Guenther in CSB 735 (585)-275-4505 or marty@cs.rochester.edu).


DANCE & MOVEMENT

Dance and Movement : University of Rochester<http://www.sas.rochester.edu/dan/>
www.sas.rochester.edu
UR DANCE. At Rochester, you can explore dance and movement as art, spiritual practice, community building, as well as personal and interpersonal development.

Todd Union Room 203
585-273-5150

"What's new in Dance?"

The Program of Dance and Movement is now offering a New Dance Major!

The Program offers a BA in Dance with two concentrations: Creative Expression and Performance, or Dance Studies, in which you can connect another area of study in any discipline with your studies in dance and/or movement.

The PROGRAM ALSO OFFERS:
- 2 MINORS: MINOR IN DANCE & MINOR IN MOVEMENT STUDIES
-4 CLUSTERS:  DANCE & PERFORMANCE, MOVEMENT & CULTURE, BODY/MIND SOMATICS, IMPROVISATION & CREATIVE PROCESS
-SUMMER COURSES:  DAN 250 Contemporary Dance: Context & Practice, DAN 195 World Dance & DAN 254 Tap Dance in American History:Context & Practice

FOR A LISTING OF ALL DANCE AND MOVEMENT COURSES, THE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS AND MINOR INFORMATION VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE AT:http://www.sas.rochester.edu/dan/
Dance and Movement : University of Rochester www.sas.rochester.edu
UR DANCE. At Rochester, you can explore dance and movement as art, spiritual practice, community building, as well as personal and interpersonal development.


*Please email Missy Pfohl Smith m.p.smith@rochester.edu or Anne Harris Wilcox annehw@rochester.rr.com for an appointment.

For additional information contact Deborah Dowd at deborah.dowd@rochester.edu<mailto:deborah.dowd@rochester.edu>

*EJ Kim, the Program's peer advisor will be available at Spurrier Room 106:
Monday, Oct 31st 6:30pm-7:30pm
Thursday, Nov 3rd  5:00pm-6:30pm

New Spring Course:
DAN 200 Anatomy and Kinesiology: This course will focus on the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems primarily in order to explore efficiency of movement, alignment, and body connectivity. Additionally, the class will explore topics that promote well-being such as: nutrition, hydration, rest, joint health, injury prevention, basic injury treatments, and fitness and strength practices that support the demands of dance. The class will include reading, discussion, research, creative approaches, writing, and kinesthetic practice.

DATA SCIENCE

http://www.rochester.edu/data-science/degrees/undergraduate.html

Academic Advisor: Michelle Vogl

Office: CSB 722
Email: michelle.vogl@rochester.edu 
To schedule an appointment: Please email Michelle directly

DIGITAL MEDIA STUDIES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/msc/digitalmedia.html

Heather Morens
DMS Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu<http://heather.morens@rochester.edu/>
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

Professor Michael Jarvis
DMS Program Director
michael.jarvis@rochester.edu<http://michael.jarvis@rochester.edu/>
Office hours: Wednesday, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Rush Rhees 455

For additional information, contact Heather Morens at heather.morens@rochester.edu in 4209B Dewey Hall or call 585-276-5305.

EARTH & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

http://www.ees.rochester.edu
227 Hutchison
585-275-5713

Open Advising: Faculty advisors will be available to meet with students who have questions about their programs. Those with interest in the geological sciences should see Anne Marie Redfield in 227 Hutchison to schedule a time to meet; students interested in environmental sciences or studies should email Karen Berger at karen.berger@rochester.edu.  For additional information, contact the department at ees@earth.rochester.edu or by calling 275-5713.

Undergraduate Student Geological Organization (USGO) meets regularly. For information, contact Sebastian Fearn at sfearn@u.rochester.edu

New and Highlighted Courses:

EES 100: Introduction to Oceanography (TR 15:25-16:40) This class is in basic oceanography. Oceanography is the study of marine systems from a physical, chemical, geological, and biological point of view. In this class, we will explore the formation and structure of the oceanic basins, the geochemistry of seawater and sediments, the ocean circulation patterns, and the composition and distribution of biological populations as a function of different physical and chemical variables. At the end of the semester, we will discuss some special topics, such as global warming and ocean acidification, overfishing, and coastal pollution.

EES 201: Evolution of the Earth (MWF 10:25-11:15) Historical geology encompasses the (1) dynamic history of the physical earth: the development of land forms, rise and fall of ancient seas, movements of continents, etc., and (2) the evolution of historical geology such as paleontology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, geochronology, and plate tectonics, and a chronological survey of earth and life history, emphasizing the evolution of North America.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES:

http://rochester.edu/college/msc/east-asian.html

Heather Morens
EST Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu<http://heather.morens@rochester.edu/>
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

ECONOMICS

http://www.econ.rochester.edu/undergraduate/advising.html
238 Harkness Hall
585-275-5252

New Courses!

Eco 275 Development Economics:

This course is an introduction to development economics. Why are some countries poor and others rich? We will explore various topics in development from classics to current 'hot' issues, and learn the causes of poverty and inequality between and within countries. The course will cover standard theories in development economics as well as new topics in political economy and historical development.


Eco 277  Financial Crises: Theory and Evidence:

The course will first examine the role of banks in the economy. In particular we will show how banks can facilitate the provision of liquidity and risk sharing. Another main question we will address is whether a financial crisis, such a bank run, can arise on its own and then spread to the non-financial sector. We will show that this is indeed theoretically possible. Subsequently, we will examine historical evidence trying to determine which of the crises in the 1930's arose on their own, as a bank run, and which arose as a consequence of a change in the real economy. Finally, we will discuss regulation and specifically how policy recommendations have changed over the years in response to economists' understanding of what causes financial crises.

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING & AUDIO & MUSIC ENGINEERING

http://www.ece.rochester.edu<http://www.ece.rochester.edu/>

Home : Electrical and Computer Engineering<http://www.ece.rochester.edu/>
www.ece.rochester.edu
RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT. Far-Reaching Applications. Since joining the University of Rochester in 2001, Wendi Heinzelman has been a leader in the international engineering ...

205 HPN
barbara.dick@rochester.edu

Advising meetings:

Contact your advisor directly to set up an appointment to complete your advising forms.  Forms must be submitted to Barbara Dick to release holds.  Other questions or additional information, contact Barbara Dick, Academic Coordinator at Barbara.dick@rochester.edu<mailto:Barbara.dick@rochester.edu>

Prof Mark Bocko Office Hours:
Monday 10/31  10 AM - 12 PM
Weds 11/2 = 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Thurs 11/3 = 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Prof. Roman Sobolewski Office Hours:
Wed. 11/2 from 1 to 3 pm

ENGINEERING SCIENCE & INTERDEPARTMENTAL ENGINEERING

Students not currently assigned to ES or IDE, but who are interested in those programs, should contact the Engineering Advising Office in Lattimore 301.

EAS 141, Basic Machine Fabrication, is a 2-credit, half-semester course only open to freshmen and sophomores next semester. 

"This course will teach students the safe and effective use of basic machine tools such as lathes, mills, band-saws and drill presses. Students will complete a number of projects that utilize these principles. Grades will be based on the successful completion of these projects. A course paper will be a written documentation of the procedures necessary to complete one of the projects done during the class. The paper will be graded on content, organization and clarity.”

ENGLISH

http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/

Department of English : University of Rochester
www.rochester.edu
Department of English 426 Morey Hall University of Rochester P.O. Box 270451 Rochester, New York 14627-0451 (585) 275-4092 (585) 442-5769 (fax) To receive department ...


426 Morey Hall
585-275-9255

Open Advising:

All majors and minors except Creative Writing (Professor Ezra Tawil) 412 Morey Hall
Tuesday, November 1st, 3:00pm-5:00pm; Wednesday, November 2nd, 11:00am-1:00pm

Creative Writing majors and minors (Professor Stephen Schottenfeld) 414 Morey Hall
Wednesday, November 2nd, 9:00am-10:00am and 12:00pm-3:00pm

For questions about clusters and any additional information contact Renée Heininger, Administrative Assistant at renee.heininger@rochester.edu or call 275-9255.

To meet with an English Peer Adviser, email Julianne McAdams jmcadams@u.rochester.edu or Oliver Valenti ovalenti@u.rochester.edu

Events

Undergraduate English Council (UEC) Halloween Meeting – all welcome!
Monday, October 31st, 7:00pm meet at ITS

New and Highlighted Courses

ENG 242 Masterpiece Theater
Professor John Michael
CRN 78607
MW 1400-1515
We will read and discuss major works in western drama from the ancient through the Renaissance in Spain, England, and France, to nineteenth and twentieth century Europe and the United States. The course would be selective and illustrative rather than comprehensive. Conventions of theatricality and representation as well as considerations of interpretation and performance will be focus our discussion. Dramatists to be considered may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Calderón, Webster, Marlowe, Racine, Moliere, Wycherley, Behn, Ibsen, Shaw, Strindberg, Hellman, Beckett, Parks and others.

ENG 267 Image, Text, and Technology
Professor Gregory Heyworth
CRN 82176
TR 1400-1515
Image, Text and Technology is an interdisciplinary course in the history of the book as a textual and visual medium, an artistic object, and a technology of communication. We will treat this history not merely in the classroom, but participate in it through a series of hands-on projects. Beginning with Aristotle’s insight that we think in images, we will consider writing as bound up in a theoretical relationship with seeing (aesthetics), perceiving (phenomenology, vision, cognitive science), and historically with technologies of dissemination, both analog and digital (manuscripts, printing, photography, television, the internet). We will explore the limits and conjunctions of visual and verbal media through theoretical and scientific readings in Plato, Lessing, Benjamin, Derrida, and McLuhan, and primary texts including the Bible, the Popol Vuh, and the Precepts of Ptah Hotep. This course may be taken alone or in conjunction with Digital Imaging: Transforming Real into Virtual (Digital Media Studies).

.

FILM & MEDIA STUDIES

http://www.sas.rochester.edu/fms/

Morey Hall 510/511

585-275-5757

FMS Program Director: Jason Middleton - jason.middleton@rochester.edu

Extended Office Hours: Thursday, March 24 1-4PM

Undergraduate Film Council (UFC) Primary Contact: Sitthipong (Ben) Chomsang - schomsan@u.rochester.edu

The Unedrgraduate Film Council meets Wednesdays at 7:45 in Morey 504

FMS Program Manager: Juliet Carello - juliet.carello@rochester.edu

HISTORY

http://www.rochester.edu/college/his/
364 Rush Rhees Library
585-275-2052

364 Rush Rhees Library
585-275-2052

History Undergraduate Open House

You are invited to a pre-registration open house hosted by the Department of History on Thursday, November 3, from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m. in Rush Rhees Library 362.
Come hear about exciting course offerings for the spring semester in a series of lightning presentations by history faculty on “Why I Teach what I Teach.”
Meet with on-call advisors in history!
Socialize with your fellow history students!
Register for exciting door prizes!
Refreshments will be served.
At 3:00 p.m., a drawing will award three $50 gift certificates to the University IT Shop.

Students needing guidance regarding History department courses and requirements for majors, minors, and clusters, can meet with the following faculty members:

Borus, Daniel

RR 452

x5-9356

daniel.borus@rochesster.edu

MW, 11:30am-12:30pm

Brown, Theodore

RR 368

x5-2051

theodore_brown@URMC.rochester.edu

M, 11:00am-1:00pm

Devaney, Thomas

RR 417

x6-6861

thomas.devaney@rochester.edu

TW, 1:00pm-2:00pm

Ho, Dahpon

RR 459

x5-7869

dho2@mai.rochester.edu

R, 12:30pm-1:45pm, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Hudson, Larry

RR460

x54557

larry.hudson@rochester.edu

M, 3pm-5pm

Inikori, Joseph

RR 437

x5-9020

inik@mail.rochester.edu

on leave

Jarvis, Michael
Director of Undergraduate Studies

RR455

x5-4558

michael.jarvis@rochester.edu

W, 2:30-4:30pm

Kaeuper, Richard

RR 441

x5-7878

richard.kaeuper@rochester.edu

by appointment

Lenoe, Matthew
Department Chair

RR 370

x5-9355

matthew.lenoe@rochester.edu

TR, 11:00-12:30pm

Mandala, Elias

RR 439

x5-2058

elias.c.mandala@rochester.edu

M, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Rubin, Joan Shelley
Director of Graduate Studies

RR 363

x5-9347

joan.rubin@rochester.edu

W, 2:00pm-4:00pm

Sierra, Pablo

RR 458

x5-8354

pablo.sierra@rochester.edu

R, 12:00-2:00pm

Slaughter, Thomas
Editor, Reviews in American History

RR 369B
RR 369

x3-2799 x3-2802

thomas.slaughter@rochester.edu

R, 11:00-12:00pm

Smoller, Laura

RR 457

x5-7221

laura.smoller@rochester.edu

M, 1:00pm-3:00pm

Weaver, Stewart

RR 461

x5-9348

stewart.weaver@rochester.edu

W, 10:00am-12:00pm

Westbrook, Robert

RR 440

x5-9349

robert.westbrook@rochester.edu

F, 9:00-11:00am

Zhang, Elya

RR 418

x5-9358

elya.zhang@gmail.com

W, 9:00am-10:15am

Special Courses Offered Spring 2017:

Special Courses Offered Spring 2017:

HIS 108: History of Mortality with Professor Devaney, TR, 9:40am-10:55am
HIS 219/219W: Animal Histories with Professor Fleischman, MW, 3:25pm-4:40pm
HIS 246/246W: Digital History: Mapping China’s Economic History with Professor Zhang, MF, 10:25am-11:40am

You may also phone (585) 275-7721 or email Laura Smoller, Director of Undergraduate Studies in History, at laura.smoller@rochester.edu<mailto:laura.smoller@rochester.edu> with any questions or to set up an appointment

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS/POLITICAL SCIENCE

http://www.rochester.edu/college/psc/undergrad/
Harkness Hall 333
585-275-4291

Advisors are available every day, usually both in the morning and afternoon. No appointments are needed during scheduled office hours. http://www.rochester.edu/college/psc/undergrad/advising_info.php

Professor Niemi niemi@rochester.edu is Director of Undergraduate Studies. For most purposes (advice about courses, signing concentration forms, approving courses taken abroad, cluster approval, etc.), you may see any of the advisors.

LEGAL STUDIES

www.rochester.edu/college/msc/legal-studies.html

The Legal Studies program offers only a minor and two clusters. It is not a pre-law program, but is intended for students who want to incorporate some focus on law into their undergraduate programs.

Authorized Signatures:

R. Curren, x5-8112, Lattimore 527, randall.curren@rochester.edu<http://randall.curren@rochester.edu/>
K. Doughty, x5-5155, Lattimore 421, kristin.doughty@rochester.edu<http://kristin.doughty@rochester.edu/>
J. Dubler, x5-4756, Rush Rhees 428A, joshua.dubler@rochester.edu<http://joshua.dubler@rochester.edu/>
J. Johnson, x5-0622, Harkness 312, jd.johnson@rochester.edu<mailto:jd.johnson@rochester.edu>

LINGUISTICS

http://www.ling.rochester.edu
503 Lattimore Hall
585-275-8053

Solveiga Armoskaite
Linguistics Undergraduate Student Adviser
Lattimore 510
solveiga.armoskaite@rochester.edu

open house hours, with cookes & tea/coffee

Monday, October 31, 4-5pm
Wednesday, Nov 2, noon-1pm, Linguistics Lounge
Friday, Nov 4, noon-1pm, Linguistics Lounge

MATHEMATICS

http://www.math.rochester.edu
915 Hylan
585-275-4411

During advising week (Oct 31-Nov 4), the Department of Mathematics undergraduate committee has advising at the following times:

Monday 2:00-4:00, Hylan 818, Amanda Tucker
Tuesday 9:00-10:30, Hylan 705, Saul Lubkin
Tuesday 10:30-12:00, Hylan 808, Mark Herman
Wednesday 1:00-2:30, Hylan 802, Carl Mueller
Wednesday 3:40-4:40, Hylan 1101, Naomi Jochnowitz
Thursday 4:00-5:30, Hylan 815, Kalyani Madhu


**Feel free to stop by at these times if you have questions, no appointment is necessary**

Mathematics Peer advisers have hours (all in math lounge on 9th floor):

Neesha Desai, Tues 1-2pm
Roberto Bertolini, Thurs 1-2pm
Rong Zhao, Fri 12:30 - 1:30pm

Any professor in the mathematics department can sign forms for declaring a mathematics major or minor and can serve as an advisor.

For more information contact:
carl.e dot mueller at rochester.edu, Carl Mueller
herman@math.rochester.edu<mailto:herman@math.rochester.edu>, Mark Herman
kmadhu@ur.rochester.edu<mailto:kmadhu@z.rochester.edu>, Kalyani Madhu
amanda.tucker@rochester.edu<mailto:amanda.tucker@rochester.edu>, Amanda Tucker

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

http://www.me.rochester.edu
235 Hopeman Building
585-275-4753

For more information, contact Ruth Eberlin, Undergraduate Program Coordinator at reberlin@me.rochester.edu or call 5-4753.

Pre-Registration Advising Sessions:

Freshman: Tuesday, March 18th, 12-2pm, ME conference room (Hopeman 224).
Sophomores: Tuesday, March 18th, 12-2pm ME conference room (Hopeman224).

MODERN LANGUAGES & CULTURES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/mlc

585-275-4251

During Advising Week, the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures will be hosting a Pre-Registration Party in Lattimore 401, on Friday, November 4, from 12:00pm – 1:00pm. Faculty will be on hand to discuss course offerings for Spring and Summer 2017. Refreshments will be provided! 

NEW AND REVISED COURSES:

CHI 116: Introduction to Classical Chinese II (Elizabeth Weber)
This course is a continuation of CHI 113. Students will continue to study the grammar and construction of Classical Chinese language—the written form that prevailed in China for centuries, into the early twentieth century when it was gradually replaced by vernacular writing. Emphasis will be on learning to read Classical Chinese texts, but in-class exercises will also include pronunciation and writing in Classical Chinese in order to ensure student comprehension.

CHI 217/ CLT 295/HIS 249: Writing Volatility and Processing Change: A Survey of the Literatures of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in the Turbulent Twentieth Century (Elizabeth Weber)
This course takes a broad historical and social approach to Chinese, Taiwanese, and Hong Kong literatures in the twentieth century. Beginning with the transformative May Fourth and New Culture movements of 1919 and the early 1920s, we will move through the twentieth century as represented in (or set as the backdrop for) iconic and thought-provoking works of literature (including fiction, essays, and poetry) produced by some of the era’s most prominent writers. We will consider these pieces as subjective snapshots presenting different perspectives on and preoccupations with the complexity of life in particular social, political, and geographic contexts. Students will thus learn not only about major schools of thought and intellectual/literary trends over the course of the century, but the political and social events, periods of conflict and upheaval, and moments of transition that shaped China’s, Taiwan’s and Hong Kong’s respective political and intellectual trajectories during the same period. Taught in English, with readings in translation.

FR 237/437/AH 249/CLT 241A/441A/ENG 240/440: Performance Studies (Anna Rosensweig)
Shakespeare tells us that “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.” But what kind of stage is our world? And what sort of players are we? This class will take up such questions through the interdisciplinary field of performance studies. We will examine topics ranging from self-expression and gender performance to forms of ritual and collective action. Taught in English.

FR 268/468: Jean Renoir and Cinema (Robert Doran)
Course analyzes and contextualizes the cinematic oeuvre of France’s greatest filmmaker and one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, Jean Renoir. Particular attention will be paid to Renoir’s innovative use of filmic techniques such as depth of focus, long take, and mis-en-scène. We will also examine the French political and cultural backdrop of the 1930s (i.e., Renoir’s engagement with the Popular Front) as well as the influence of cinematic genres such as film noir, poetic realism, and literary adaptation. Readings from Bazin, Renoir, and Deleuze. Conducted in French.

FR 269/469/AH 243/CLT 231F/431F/ENG 240/440: Foucault and the Ethics of Theory (Robert Doran)
Course explores the crucial role played by French philosopher Michel Foucault in the ethical and political transformations of “Theory” or “Critical Theory,” an intellectual movement that has had a profound effect on literary studies, art history, cultural studies, cultural anthropology, gender studies, historical theory, musicology, and visual/film studies. Readings include Badiou, Barthes, Butler, Derrida, Foucault, Habermas, Jameson, Rabaté, Rancière, Rorty, Said, Spivak, White. Taught in English.

GER 218/418/CLT 223/423/ENG 240/HIS 298/JST 238: And Now... Deep Thoughts with German-Jewish Thinkers! (Jason Peck)
This course will shift the focus from a general overview of German intellectual history, to a focus on German-Jewish intellectual history. The intellectual histories of the German and Jewish people are intertwined starting at the end of the 18th century. This course will read key texts in this history, acknowledging the catastrophe that is the Holocaust, but also engaging texts by German-Jewish intellectuals written after the Holocaust. Writers include: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Richard Wagner, Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, and Hannah Arendt, among many others. Taught in English.

GER 221/421/CLT 222C/422C/GSW 271: Gender, Love, and Families (Susan Gustafson)
This course explores the same-sex desires, love, non-exclusive relationships, and adoptive families with two fathers, two mothers, etc. that were represented as ideal relationships in 18th century German literature. In contrast to traditional views of the 18th-century obsession with bourgeois and aristocratic families determined by fathers interested only in economic endeavors and preserving heritage, this course will explore the counter discourses that arose in the 18th century that highlighted the fundamental need for love as the foundation of all families. Taught in English.

GER 247/447/CLT 202B/FMS 209/JST 219: Holocaust: Affect and Absence (June Hwang)
How does one represent the unrepresentable? This is the key question we will explore as we look at films and literature about the Holocaust. As we look at fictional films, novels, documentaries and memoirs, we will discuss topics including memory, trauma, truth and representation. This course offers a look at the ways in which artists and their audiences negotiate the themes of loss, horror and redemption within the context of the Holocaust and its aftermath. Taught in English.

GER 256: Advanced Topics in German Studies: Kafka and Kleist (Susan Gustafson)
Franz Kafka is one of Austria's most famous and influential writers. His short prose works have had a tremendous impact on contemporary literature and cultural studies. In this course you will learn what "kafkaesque" means in its complexity. Heinrich von Kleist is less well-known in the US, but he, like Kafka, provides representations of modern bureaucratic nightmares, of blurred boundaries between reality and fantasy, ailing artists, and non-existent or idolized women. This course is taught in German.

IT 224A/CLT 244A/FMS 263A: Create a Documentary: Italy’s Hidden Treasures – Topics in Italian Culture (Federico Siniscalco)
The course aims to introduce students to the history of the documentary film genre, to offer hands-on experience in documentary film production and editing, and to reflect on some of the major issues in intercultural communication, and more specifically in the representation of one of the most significant areas of southern Italy. Students will contribute to the production of a documentary film on the island of Procida, in the bay of Naples. Most of the course work will be conducted on the editing of pre-recorded footage of Procida, however, there will also be a production component where the students will shoot and edit their own interviews with local Rochesterians whose ancestors are from the island of Procida, or more generally from the province of Naples. As a preliminary phase to editing and producing an interview, Procida’s local culture, history, literature and art will be investigated through selected readings and films. Taught in English.

JPN 212/212W/412/CLT 278/478/FMS 208: Hello Kitty Must Die: Japanese Popular Culture in Global Contexts (David Holloway)
In this multimedia course, we will examine a range of Japanese popular culture, including anime, manga, film, literature, and fashion. Through this exploration we will extend our understanding of Japanese cultural artifacts. But we will also use popular culture in Japan as a springboard for discussing pressing social issues such as gender, class, sexuality, nationalism, and consumer culture. Our goal is to rethink Japan through an investigation of popular culture, and to become attune to the mechanisms that have shaped and continue to shape Japan—its culture, its society, its place in the world. Class time will be devoted to lectures, discussions, and writing exercises. Taught in English.

JPN 217/217W/CLT 267: Mirror of the Modern: Traditional Japanese Literature (David Holloway)
This chronological survey of Japanese literature covers antiquity to the 18th century. We will consider the emergence of, contexts for, and aesthetics behind a variety of literary mediums including myths, prose, poetry, travelogues, diaries, and warrior tales. Conducted in a lecture/discussion format, this course focuses on literary works, though we will have opportunity to consider visual and aural interpretations and adaptations of many of the “great” works of classical Japanese letters. This course is intended to help students develop an appreciation for Japan’s literary heritage, while encouraging a sophisticated and comparative understanding of the prominent themes and motifs of literary texts. No prior knowledge of Japanese or Japan is required or expected. All texts will be read in English translation.

KOR 152: Intermediate Korean II (Myounghee Cho)
This course is the second half of the intermediate course designed for students who have an equivalent proficiency level with KOR 151. Focus is on equipping students with sociolinguistic and cross-cultural knowledge and achieving the intermediate level of proficiency and fluency in Korean. Four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) will be equally emphasized throughout this course. Students must register for the corresponding recitation.

POL 268/468/FMS 268: Post-1989 Polish Culture Through Film, Literature, and Digital Media (Piotr Marecki)
The main objective of the course is to familiarize students with contemporary Polish culture through a comparative media studies approach. In addition to studying movies, fiction, non-fiction, and graphic novels, we will explore new genres such as electronic literature, popular memes, and independent games. We will examine how digital media shape the contemporary use of text and the process of remediation between analog and digital forms. We will apply this media-based and comparative approach to study contemporary Poland and its culture. Taught in English.

SP 262C/462C: Disabling Discourse: Disability in Spanish-American Literature (Beth Jörgensen)
Disabled characters and metaphors that exploit the meanings associated with disability have been pervasive in story telling in many cultures since ancient times, and they remain a constant of literature, film, television, and other forms of narrative up to the present. This course studies the representation of characters with disabilities in Spanish-American literature from a variety of critical perspectives developed by disability studies scholars in the Global North and the Global South. Reading response papers, short essays, in-class presentation, one exam. Taught in Spanish.

SP 280/480: The Transhispanic Supernatural: Ghosts, Witches, and Vampires in Film and Literature from Spain and Spanish America (Raúl Rodríguez-Hernández and Claudia Schaefer)
A long tradition of supernatural interventions in everyday life has been portrayed in a wide variety of images in Hispanic cultures from Spain to the Americas, and from colonial times to the 21st century. This course explores the folkloric, the Gothic, and the neo-Gothic traditions as assimilated and portrayed in the media, in literature, and in the cinema as well as hybrid genres such as vampire comedies, haunted schools and children, and the political supernatural. We will explore theories of recycling and reinterpreting the supernatural to study how societies of the Spanish-speaking world have portrayed interactions between the natural world and elements of the supernatural, how they are reimagined, whether explanations are possible or ambiguities resist explanation, and the politics of the supernatural. Taught in Spanish.

MUSIC

https://www.sas.rochester.edu/mur/

NEW COURSES SPRING:

MUR 144  BEETHOVEN AND HIS WORLD

(descripton) This course will provide an in-depth look at this iconic composer and his music, including selections from the symphonies, string quartets, piano sonatas, and the opera Fidelio, with a special emphasis on works that will be performed live in Rochester this semester. Reading assignments and class discussions will place Beethoven's music within its tumultuous historical context amid the political upheavals of the Napoleonic era, as well as exploring the continuing influence of Beethoven on more recent musicians and creative artists. The ability to read music is not required.

MUR 138 PHONO-GRAPHY/MUSIC & AA LIT

(descripton) This course investigates how music structured the politics and literature of race, enslavement, and citizenship for African Americans from the U.S. abolitionist movement to the early twentieth century. Even though recorded sound was only just beginning to become popular during the end of this period, music provided fertile ground from which writers, thinkers, and activists negotiated the momentous changes African Americans saw during these years. In order to develop tools by which to read for sound we will study the work of sound theorists such as Jacques Attali, Jonathan Sterne, Alexander Weheliye, and Katherine Biers. We will also examine various types of recordings including the songbook Slave Songs of the United States (1867), late-nineteenth-century cylinder and acetate recordings, and early blues and jazz recordings.

(department contact)

Dewey 1-316
585-275-939

Contact Elaine Stroh for any additional information at estroh@ur.rochester.edu or by calling 585-275-9397.

MUSIC & SOUND MINORS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/mas

Program Advisor: Dr. David Temperley
Office: 26 Gibbs Street (Eastman)/Meliora 322
Email:  dtemperley@esm.rochester.edu

Undergraduate Coordinator: Melinda Adelman
Office: Meliora 363
Email:   madelma2@ur.rochester.edu

Students  seeking advice about the Music Cognition minor, Music and Linguistics minor, or Music and Sound clusters, can make an appointment with the Undergraduate Coordinator by visiting https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me.

Questions and requests for appointments with Dr.  Temperley can also be directed to dtemperley@esm.rochester.edu.

http://www.nav.rochester.edu
100 Morey Hall
585-275-9032

To learn more about life in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps or how our classes can be combined with university clusters please come by our office Monday- Friday between 9:00am and 2:00pm. Also you can contact our Executive Officer at xo@mail.rochester.edu or (585) 275-9032.

OPTICS

http://www.optics.rochester.edu
Wilmot Building
585-275-7720

Spring 2017 Optics advising will be held March 28th-April 1st. Students should make an appointment with their respective advisers to arrange next semester's schedule.

For more information contact Daniel Smith, Undergraduate Program Administrator at daniel.smith@rochester.edu or call 275-7764.

PHILOSOPHY

http://www.rochester.edu/college/phl/
525 Lattimore
585-275-8107

Professor FitzPatrick will be holding office hours on Thursday, October 29th, from 1:00-4:00pm, with the last hour (3-4) reserved specially for advising.  Please drop by with any questions you may have about the department, major or minor.

The Undergraduate Philosophy Council meets Fridays, 2-3:30 PM, in Lattimore 501. All are welcome.

For additional information, contact Professor FitzPatrick at william.fitzpatrick@rochester.edu or the department administrator at phladmin@philosophy.rochester.edu or by calling 585-275-4105.

In addition to its typical course offerings, the Department of Philosophy will be offering some new or less commonly taught courses that may be of particular interest, such as:

PHL 260: Topics in Philosophical Theology: Faith

PHL 312: Neuroethics

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY

http://www.pas.rochester.edu/urpas/page/undergradprograms
211 Bausch & Lomb
585-275-4937

Students interested in Physics or Physics and Astronomy are more than welcome to set up appointments.

Monday thru Friday:

Prof. Frank Wolfs, Physics Advisor, wolfs@pas.rochester.edu, B&L 203A, available until the end of the semester.
OR
Prof. Eric Blackmon, Astronomy Advisor, eblackmon@pas.rochester.edu, B&L 417A available until the end of the semester.
OR
Linda Cassidy, Undergraduate Program Coordinator, lcassidy@pas.rochester.edu, B&L 211, 9:00am-4:00pm,

For additional information, contact the department at wolfs@pas.rochester.edu and lcassidy@pas.rochester.edu or by calling 5-4937.

POLITICAL SCIENCE/INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/psc/undergrad/
Harkness Hall 333
585-275-4291

The Political Science department invites all students to a PSC/IR Information Night.  

November 1, 5-6:30 PM in Havens Lounge (4th floor Wilson Commons).

  • Come learn about new PSC and IR courses for spring 2017.
  • Meet professors.
  • Ask questions about majors and courses.
  • Hang out with other Political Science and IR students.
  • Eat pizza.

PSYCHOLOGY

http://www.psych.rochester.edu/undergrad/
441 Meliora Hall
585-275-8704

New advising hours: http://www.psych.rochester.edu/undergrad/advising.html

Undergrad Council contacts:

Eurjin "E.J." Kim, Co-President, ekim44@u.rochester.edu
Jennifer Hennig, Co-President, jhennig2@u.Rochester.edu

For additional information contact April Engram at april.engram@rochester.edu.

PUBLIC HEALTH RELATED PROGRAMS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/MSC/publichealth/
Dewey Hall 4209-B
585-276-5305

For more information please contact, jennifer.sherwood@rochester.edu.

Jennifer Sherwood has walk-ins:

Monday, 1-3:30 p.m.

Thursday, 1-3:30 p.m.

Friday, 10-11:30 a.m.

Bioethics Faculty Adviser

Professor Richard Dees

 

Office hours: Monday, 11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Thursday, 8:30-9:30 a.m. by appointment

Epidemiology and Environmental Health Faculty Adviser

Professor Edwin van Wijngaarden

Office Hours:Available by appointment
Please contact: edwin_van_wijngaarden@urmc.rochester.edu

Health, Behavior, and Society (HBS) Faculty Adviser

Professor Nancy Chin

Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursdays, 9-10:45 a.m.
Dewey 2-134

Professor Chin will not be available during advising week

contact: nancy_chin@urmc.rochester.edu

Health Policy Faculty Adviser

Professor Theodore Brown
Office Hours: By appointment
Lattimore 529

contact: Theodore.Brown@ rochester.edu


RELIGION & CLASSICS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/rel/

Emil Homerin
427 Rush Rhees Library
585-275-4760

For information about the Undergraduate Council in Religion and Classics visit the website http://www.rochester.edu/College/REL/council.html.

****NEW COURSE*****

REL 159 – Interfaith Relations: The Globalization of God (4 Credits)

This course is an exploration of the dynamic interactions between people of the diverse religions of the world as religiously pluralistic societies adapt to their multi-faith reality. We study the history of interfaith dialogue globally, nationally and locally with a particular focus on the interfaith movement on college campuses in the United States. We use case studies to examine how religion, politics and culture interact to create opportunities for positive or negative engagement across religious traditions. We study the etiquette of interreligious engagement in multi-religious contexts building skills for global citizenship. Students will be assigned to a community partner organization (e.g. Gandhi Institute, Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue) for hands-on interfaith projects and will attend and observe religious rituals in three world religious traditions.

RUSSIAN STUDIES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/MLC/ug_russian
424 Lattimore Hall
585-275-4176

For additional information, contact Kathleen Parthé, Director of Russian Studies at Kathleen.parthe@rochester.edu or by calling 275-4176.

STATISTICS

http://www.math.rochester.edu
703 Hylan
585-275-4178

For additional information, contact S.R.S. Rao Poduri at raos@math.rochester.edu or by calling 275-4178.

SUSTAINABILITY MINOR

http://rochester.edu/college/msc/sustainability.html

Professor Karen Berger's Office Hours: 202 Hutchison Hall, by appointment email karen.berger@rochester.edu or sign up at 

 https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rc1aYsFaXwZ9n15O8KUdRg-PJpOogVKiSfNaXZsLRY0/edit?usp=sharing)

THEATER

www.rochester.edu/theatre
107 Todd Union
585-275-4959

Nigel Maister - usually available Monday - Friday 11:30am - 6pm
EXCEPT Mon 2-4:40, Wed 2-4:40 and 5-6 and Fri 2-4:40

Gordon Rice - Production Manager
usually available Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm
EXCEPT Mon 10am-12:30pm, Tues/Thurs 11:05am-12:20pm

The EXCEPT are times when Nigel and Gordon are teaching. Any other time, they are pretty flexible.

For additional information, contact Nigel Maister, Artistic Director at nigel.maister@rochester.edu or Katie Farrel, katie.farrell@rochester.edu

WOMEN’S STUDIES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/wst/
538 Lattimore Hall
585-275-8318

To set up an advising appointment or get more information about the Women’s Studies program, contact sbai@rochester.edu or call 275-8318.

Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program

http://writing.rochester.edu
G121 Rush Rhees Library
(585) 273-3584

Open Advising: Our office is open Monday through Friday, 8:00am – 5:00pm for questions and assistance.

For additional information, contact the program at wsap@z.rochester.edu or by calling 273-3584.