Orientation

Advising Week

Registration Dates and Times for Fall 2016 Courses

It is once again time to register for classes. Please use the information below to prepare for registration by learning about majors, minors, clusters, courses, independent study, Undergraduate councils, and more! See the links below for department specific information on the best way to reach advising Faculty members on campus. If you need more assistance, please feel free to visit the College Center for Advising Services (CCAS) in 312 Lattimore.

Monday, March 28

10am-12pm and 1-3pm, Health Professions Pop Up Advising: Outside Danforth Dining Hall

2:30-3:30pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: Gavett 208 - Chemistry Department 

5-6pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: Gleason Library - Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department 

Tuesday, March 29

1:30-2:30pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: Georgen Atrium - Electrical Computer Engineering Department 

Wednesday, March 30

10am-12pm, CCAS Pop Up Advising: in Starbucks Lounge with Molly Jolliff and Liz Monte 

12-3pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: in Georgen 4th Floor Lounge - Optical Engineering Department 

2-3pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: in Gleason Library- Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department 

Thursday, March 31

6-7pm, Peer Advising Pop Up: Gleason Library - Biology Department 

Friday, April 1

12:00-1:30pm Biology-Chemistry-Physics Peer Advising Event in the Green Carpet Lounge. Get questions answered about classes/research/summer/whatever! Stop by and chat with an adviser in any of the three departments. A great time to figure out all of your Natural Science questions.


Monday April 4, 2016—Registration begins:

Thursday, April 7, Registration re-opens for everyone at 8 a.m.


College Center for Advising Services- all-day Walk-In hours:

Advising Week March 28 through April 1, 2016

Highlighting Academic Resources to help you be more successful here!

Follow the links below to information for department/program advising information:

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES / FREDERICK DOUGLASS INSTITUTE

http://www.rochester.edu/College/AAS
301 Morey Hall
585-276-5744

****NEW COURSES*****
AAS 204:Early Civilizations of Africa
AAS 230: The Black Body: Intersecting Intimacies
AAS 229: Representation of Black Childhood
AAS 302: Archaeology of West Africa

For additional information, email the Institute Director ciko@mail.rochester.edu or call 276-5744.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

http://www.asl.rochester.edu
116 Lattimore Hall
Voice/TTY 585-273-5165

For additional information, contact thest program at asl@rochester.edu or call 273-5165.


ANTHROPOLOGY

http://www.rochester.edu/College/ant/
440 Lattimore Hall
585-275-8614

Open advising:  Thursday March 31 10:00a.m.-2:00p.m., 444 Lattimore Hall

Anthropology faculty will be available to provide information about the anthropology major over light refreshments and snacks.

For more information about the Department of Anthroplogy undergraduate student council meetings, contact Amelia Kelly at akelly14@u.rochester.edu

For additional information, contact the department at C.Fishgold@rochester.edu or by calling 275-8614.

****NEW COURSE***** 

ANT 204: "Ethnographic Themes: American Kinship(s)," MW 1150 to 1305
Kinship as a social phenomenon is a foundational concept in anthropology. Through engagement with theoretical and ethnographic approaches to kinship in the U.S. since the 1960s, this course will address the following questions: 1) How have anthropological concepts of kinship evolved over the past 50 years? 2) What makes a family in the U.S.? Is kinship rooted in biology or culture? 3) Does ‘American kinship’ constitute a coherent cultural system? 4) How does kinship intersect with race, class, and gender? 5) And how are the insights of anthropological studies of kinship applicable to contemporary social life outside the classroom?  In answering these questions, we will consult a range of materials including theoretical texts, full-length ethnographic accounts, periodicals, film, and various artifacts of contemporary American kinship and its portrayals.  With the U.S. as their field site, students will better understand how American kinship—we may more accurately use the term “kinships”—is both a product of and produces American culture.

ARCHAEOLOGY, TECHNOLOGY & HISTORICAL STRUCTURES

www.rochester.edu/college/ATHS

ATHS Mandatory Advising Session - Friday, March 25, In preparation for registering for the Fall 2016 semester, all ATHS students (majors and minors) must meet with Professor Perucchio, ATHS director, to review their program on Friday, March 25 from 9:00am-1:00pm in Hopeman 415 (Prof. Perucchio's office). This is a walk-in session, you don't need to reserve a time. Please contact Professor Perucchio in advance at rlp@me.rochester.edu to confirm that you will make this meeting.
Program Events:
ATHS Open House - Wednesday, March 23, Art & Music Library (Ground Floor, Rush Rhees Library), 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
**If possible, could we insert the attached ATHS Open House flyer here**

Public Symposium: Analysis and Conservation of Cultural Heritage Monuments: Challenges and Approaches Across Disciplines - Wednesday, March 30, Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library, 3:00 - 6:30 p.m.
**Please note that there will not be an opportunity for program advising at this event.
**If possible, could we insert the attached Analysis and Conservation ... symposium poster here**
***New Course Offerings***

AH 188/ANT 287/HIS 138: Cities & Urbanism in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica and the Andes

The discipline of archaeology can make unique contributions to our understanding of urbanism and daily life given its ability to examine long-term processes of development and change. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction and overview of urbanism as exemplified by the indigenous cities of the New World (e.g. Mesoamerica and South America). While regional differences will be discussed, we will focus mainly on identifying the theoretical issues that intersect all of the regions we will be studying.

AH 251/ANT 283/HIS 217: Prehistory of Ancient Peru: The Incas and Their Ancestors

From Machu Picchu to the geoglyphs on the Nasca desert, the Andean region of South America has a long and rich pre-Columbian history. This course will survey the archaeological approaches to understanding the development of Andean cultures that ranges from hunter-gatherers to the Inca Empire. Some of the prehistoric cultures we will be examining include Caral, Chavin, Nasca, Wari, and the Inca. This class will also discuss plant and animal domestication, inequality, gender, ceramics, urbanization, and the rise and fall of states and empires.

Heather Morens

ATH Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm

Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

Professor Renato Perucchio
ATH Program Director
rlp@me.rochester.edu

Office hours: Tuesday, 3:30-4:30 pm; Thursday, 10:00-11:00 am

For additional information, contact Heather Morens at heather.morens@rochester.edu in 4209B Dewey Hall or call 585-276-5305.

ART & ART HISTORY

http://www.rochester.edu/college/aah/
424 Morey Hall
585-275-9249

Stephanie Ashenfelder
Program Coordinator & Undergraduate Advisor, Studio Arts
Monday-Thursday
10:00am - 2:00pm
424 Sage Art Center

Grace Seiberling
Faculty/Undergraduate Advisor
Monday - 11:00am - 5:00pm,
Wednesday -11:00am - 4:00pm,
And by appointment.
422 Morey Hall

Studio Art:

Open Advising: For Studio Art, during the week preceding registration, walk-in hours are available with Stephanie Ashenfelder, Program Manager, Monday through Thursday until 10-2PM. Stephanie may be contacted at stephanie.ashenfelder@rochester.edu or by visiting Sage Art Center. For Studio Art, during the week preceding registration, walk-in hours are available with Allen Topolski, undergraduate advisor, Friday 11:30-1:30.

Additional Advising: Stephanie holds office hours during the semester from 11:30-1:30 am Monday through Thursday. Appointments preferred. Stephanie may be contacted at stephanie.ashenfelder@rochester.edu or by visiting Sage Art Center. If you have any questions about studio art and how to become part of Sage Art Center please contact her.

If you are interested in hearing more about the Art & Art History Council please contact Gabryella Pulsinelli <gpulsine@u.rochester.edu>

Highlighted Courses:

Introduction to Studio Practice: This course provides a broad framework for contemporary art practice for introductory art students interested in exploring a variety of media. Ideas are are executed in multiple artistic disciplines including drawing, print, sculpture and digital. No experience necessary.

Dance on Camera, Camera on Dance: In this advanced level course, students will create and perform multi-media site-specific choreography and installations that will be captured and re-mixed. Students will be encouraged to curiously and playfully embody manipulations of movement material and play with technology to better understand different points of view and to explore the elements of site, space, shape, time and effort to see how they affect quality and content.

BIOLOGY & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/index.html
488 Hutchison
585-275-3850

Friday April 1 -12:00-1:30pm Biology-Chemistry-Physics Peer Advising Event in the Green Carpet Lounge. Get questions answered about classes/research/summer/whatever! Stop by and chat with an adviser in any of the three departments. A great time to figure out all of your Natural Science questions.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY & MEDICINE

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/index.html

Freshman who are planning a BA in Biology (BIO), or a BS major in Biochemistry (BBC) Cell and Developmental Biology (BCD), Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (BEB), Microbiology (BMB) or Molecular Genetics may also visit the following website for tips on what courses to register for the fall semester of their sophomore year: http://www.rochester.edu/college/BIO/UPBM/FreshmanAdvising_TypicalSchedule.pdf.

Freshman who are planning a BS in Neuroscience (BNS) should enroll in NSC 201/201P Neurobiology with Lab during the fall semester of their sophomore year

 

Biological Sciences BA Major (BA BIO) and Minor (BI)

Website:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bio.html

Academic Advisor: Danielle Presgraves, PhD
Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 226B
Email: danielle.presgraves@rochester.edu
Phone:  (585) 275-3848

To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Presgraves directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.
How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

  1. Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements
  1. Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval
  1. Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

 

BS in Biological Sciences – Cell & Developmental Biology (BS BCD)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bcd.html

Academic Advisor: David Lambert, PhD.
Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 344
Email: dlamber2@z.rochester.edu
Phone: (585) 273-2482)
To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Lambert directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

  1. Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements
  1. Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval
  1. Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

 

BS in Biological Sciences Computational Biology (BS BCB)

Website:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bcb.html

Academic Advisor: Amanda Larracuente, PhD


Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 343


Email: alarracu@bio.rochester.edu


Phone: (585) 273-1693


To schedule an appointment: Please email Dr. Larracuente directly
.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.
How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

  1. Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements
  1. Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval
  1. Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

  

BS in Biological Sciences Ecology & Evolutionary Biology (BS BEB)

Website:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/beb-17.html

Academic Advisor: James Fry, PhD
Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 318
Email: james.fry@rochester.edu
Phone: (585) 275-7835
To schedule an appointment: Please email Dr. Fry directly to set-up an appointment.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

  1. Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements
  1. Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval
  1. Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

 

BS Biological Sciences Molecular Genetics (BS BMG)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/College/BIO/UPBM/majors/upbmbsmg.htm

Academic Advisor: Elaine Sia, PhD
Office: Hutchison Hall, Room 332
Email: elaine.sia@rochester.edu
Phone: (585) 275-9275 To schedule an appointment: Please email Dr. Sia directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.
How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

  1. Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements
  1. Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval
  1. Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

 

BS in Biological Sciences Biochemistry (BS BBC)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bbc.html

Academic Advisor: Elizabeth Grayhack, PhD
Office: Medical Center, Room 3-7415. Directions.
Email: elizabeth_grayhack@urmc.rochester.edu
Phone: (585) 275-2765
To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Grayhack directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

  1. Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements
  1. Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval
  1. Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

  

BS in Biological Sciences Microbiology (BS BMB)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/college/bio/undergraduate/academics/bmb.html

Academic Advisor: Jacques Robert, PhD
Office: Medical Center, MRBX Building, Room 2-11124. Directions.
Email: mailto:jacques_robert@urmc.rochester.edu
Phone: (585) 275-5359
To schedule an appointment: e-mail Dr. Robert directly.  Be sure to include 2 – 3 dates and times of availability.

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

  1. Meet with the UPBM Administrator to Make Schedule for Completing Major Requirements
  1. Meet with Major Advisor to review schedule for approval
  1. Submit signed paperwork person to the College Center for Academic Advising Services

 

BS in Biological Sciences Neuroscience (BS BNS)

Websitehttp://www.rochester.edu/College/BIO/UPBM/majors/upbmbsnsc.htm

Academic Advisor: Dr. Ben Hayden
Office: Meliora Hall, Room 309
Email: bhayden2@ur.rochester.edu
Phone: 276-4023 (x6-4023)
To schedule an appointment: Please e-mail Dr. Hayden directly

Undergraduate Coordinator: Melinda Adelman
Office: Meliora Hall, Room 363
Email: madelman@mail.bcs.rochester.edu
Phone: 275-0541 (x5-0541)
To schedule an appointment: visit https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me

How to Declare Your Major / Applying for Acceptance:

Students interested in a BS in Neuroscience are welcome to meet with the Undergraduate Coordinator to create an academic plan.  Students who are preparing to declare the major must do this before being assigned to an academic advisor for the BNS track.  During the week preceding registration, additional walk-in hours are available 10:00-11:00am on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.  For information about the BCS/Neuroscience Undergraduate Council, visithttps://ccs.rochester.edu/organization/bcsneuroscienceundergraduatecouncil

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Biomedical Engineering will hold a Pre-registration for Fall 2016 event on Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 2:30 – 5:00 pm in Munnerlyn Atrium.

http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/bme/resources/news/?display=2010
Robert C. Goergen Hall
585-273-4754

BME Undergraduate Coordinator:

Taimi Marple
(585) 275-1866
Taimi_Marple@urmc.rochester.edu

BRAIN & COGNITIVE SCIENCES

http://www.bcs.rochester.edu

Undergraduate Coordinator: Melinda Adelman
Office: Meliora Hall, Room 363
Email: madelman@mail.bcs.rochester.edu
Phone: 275-0541 (x5-0541)
To schedule an appointment: visit https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me

Students interested in Brain and Cognitive Sciences are welcome to meet with the Undergraduate Coordinator to create and academic plan.  Students who are preparing to declare the major must do this before being assigned to an academic adviser in BCS.  During the week preceding registration, additional walk-in hours are available 10:00-11:00am on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.  11:00am on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

Additionally, the BCS Peer Advisors will be holding walk-in hours on Tuesday, March 29th and Thursday, March 31st from 3:30 to 5:30pm in Meliora 418. For information about the BCS/Neuroscience Undergraduate Council, visit

http://ccc.rochester.edu/organization/bcsneuroscienceundergraduatecouncil

BUSINESS

See MSC

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

http://www.che.rochester.edu/
206 Gavett Hall
585-275-4041

Pre-Registration Advising Sessions:

Tuesday 3/29, 2-4pm Gavett 208

Wednesday 3/30, 12-2pm Gavett 208

Contact Jennifer Condit, Undergrad Coordinator, with questions (condit@che.rochester.edu) (585) 275-4042.

CHEMISTRY

http://www.chem.rochester.edu/events/AdvisingWeek.php
404D Hutchison Hall
phone: 585-276-3663
email: ugradadm@chem.rochester.edu

Student's should feel free to stop by at the times listed below with any questions. 
No appointment is necessary. Student's are also encouraged to contact one of our Peer Advisors www.chem.rochester.edu/undergrad/peer.php for general assistance.

Friday April 1 -12:00-1:30pm Biology-Chemistry-Physics Peer Advising Event in the Green Carpet Lounge. Get questions answered about classes/research/summer/whatever! Stop by and chat with an adviser in any of the three departments. A great time to figure out all of your Natural Science questions.

Authorized Signatures for Forms:
 -  MAJOR/MINOR Declaration Forms:  All members of the Chemistry Undergraduate Studies Committee listed at: www.chem.rochester.edu/undergrad/committee.php.  

 -  TRANSFER of COURSE CREDIT Requests:  Prof. Josh Goodman, or email to ugadadm@chem.rochester.edu. 

Drop-In/Open Advising Hours:

 

Monday 3/28:

 

Tuesday 3/29:

Wednesday 3/30:

 

Thursday 3/31:

 

Friday 4/1:

 

For more information or to schedule an appointment please email the Undergraduate Program Administrator, at ugradadm@chem.rochester.edu.


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

****NEW COURSE*****

CAS 120 – Exploring Intercultural Competence: Preparation for the Global Citizen (4 Credits)

What is intercultural competence? What is intercultural communication? How does one become interculturally competent in their increasingly globalized lives? Intercultural competence provides the tools needed to interact with other cultures, socioeconomic statuses, political beliefs, racial and ethnic backgrounds, sexual orientations, gender expressions, gender identities, abilities, and religious affiliations. Learning with and by people of different backgrounds encourages collaboration and fosters innovation and creativity, thereby benefitting the entire community. This course will be interactive and discussion based. Discussions will include guest speakers, reading personal narratives, as well as using popular media. Assignments will encourage students to conduct research, create an intercultural activity, and interact with people by conducting interviews. This course culminates with a group project, allowing for integration of theory and practice.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

http://www.cs.rochester.edu
735 Computer Studies
585-275-4505

Advising meetings:

Advisors should be contacting you to inform you of their advising availability.  If you are unable to make the assigned time for your advisor, please contact him or her directly to set up an appointment to complete your advising forms. Once your advising form has been completed, your adviser will lift your hold so you can register.  No form - no lifted hold.
Other questions? Contact (Mrs.) Marty Guenther in CSB 735 (585)-275-4505 or marty@cs.rochester.edu).

DANCE & MOVEMENT

www.rochester.edu/college/dance/
Todd Union Room 203
585-273-5150

"What's new in Dance?"

Please email Missy Pfohl Smith m.p.smith@rochester.edu or Anne Harris Wilcox annehw@rochester.ee.com for an appointment.

For additional information contact Deborah Dowd at deborah.dowd@rochester.edu or call 585-273-5150

New Courses

DAN 378 Choreographic Voice: Dance and Social Justice
In this course, students will study various choreographic works that address issues of social justice as thematic material, political activism, and historical reflection. Dialogue and readings on the social responsibility of the artist will frame a creative process and choreographic practice where students will also develop their own socially conscious choreography that will ultimately be presented and discussed in a public forum. Pre-requisite: DAN 278 Choreography, DAN/SA/FMS/DMS 243 Dance on Camera/Camera on Dance, or permission of instructor.

DAN 380 Repertory and Performance (3 credits)*
DAN 380 gives students the opportunity to delve into critically acclaimed repertory of faculty & guest choreographers. Classes are conducted in the form of professional dance rehearsals, culminating in performances. Will perform repertory material for the university community, Rochester Fringe Festival, the American College Dance Assoc conference, & for the Greater Rochester community during the 2015-16 academic year. A lab is attached to the classes to enable sufficient rehearsal time & preparation. This year’s repertory features work by Anne Harris Wilcox. Wilcox will set her phantasmagorical Halloween dance/theater piece, When the Souls Rise, as well as an additional work from the Present Tense Dance Company repertory on the DAN 380 students. Intermediate – Advanced dancers are encouraged to audition. *Enrollment in the 1 credit DAN 397 Dance Ensemble course in the spring, though not required, is highly recommended and will complete this 4-credit bundle for Creative Expression. Audition: Friday, March 27th 2:00pm-3:15pm Spurrier Dance Studio or 1st day of classes.

DATA SCIENCE

http://www.rochester.edu/data-science/degrees/undergraduate.html

Academic Advisor: Michelle Vogl

Office: CSB 722
Email: michelle.vogl@rochester.edu 
To schedule an appointment: Please email Michelle directly

DIGITAL MEDIA STUDIES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/msc/digitalmedia.html

Heather Morens
DMS Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

Professor Michael Jarvis
DMS Program Director
michael.jarvis@rochester.eduOffice hours: Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:00pm
Rush Rhees 455

For additional information, contact Heather Morens at heather.morens@rochester.edu in 4209B Dewey Hall or call 585-276-5305.

EARTH & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

http://www.ees.rochester.edu
227 Hutchison
585-275-5713

Open Advising: Faculty advisors will be available to meet with students who have questions about their programs. Those with interest in the geological sciences should see Kathy Lutz in 227 Hutchison to schedule a time to meet; students interested in environmental sciences or studies should email Karen Berger at karen.berger@rochester.edu.  For additional information, contact the department at ees@earth.rochester.edu or by calling 275-5713.

Undergraduate Student Geological Organization (USGO) meets regularly. For information, contact Miriam Grisby at mgrisby@u.rochester.edu

New and Highlighted Courses:

EES 105: Itroduction to Climate Change (TR 11:05-12:20)

This course will explore the Earth's dynamic climate system through lectures, discussions and computer-based modeling of climate processes. The course is designed to be accessible to all students. We will work toward an understanding of several fundamental and important questions. What are the main factors that determine the Earth's climate? What forces can drive climate to change? What can we learn from climate change in the Earth's distant past, when our planet experienced periods of both extreme cold and warmth? How do we know that our climate is now changing? What can we expect from the Earth's climate in the near future and how would it affect us?

EAST ASIAN STUDIES:
http://rochester.edu/college/msc/east-asian.html
Heather Morens
EST Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

ECONOMICS

http://www.econ.rochester.edu/undergraduate/advising.html
238 Harkness Hall
585-275-5252

Office Hours:

Professor Michael Wolkoff: Harkness 238B
Monday/Wednesday 10:30am-11:30am
Tuesday 3:00pm-4:00pm

Professor Stanley Engerman: Harkness 203
Wednesday 1:30pm-4:00pm

Professor Michael Rizzo: Harkness 236
Monday (sign-up) 12:00pm-1:30pm
Wednesday (walk-in) 12:00pm-1:30pm
Friday (sign-up) 10:00am-11:00am

In addition to our regular advising hours, Professor Rizzo and Professor Wolkoff will be available Thursday afternoon during advising week.

For more information contact Jenna Wernert at jenna.wernert@rochester.edu or call 275-8625. For information about the Economics Undergraduate Council contact Tejas Pathak or visit the department website.

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING & AUDIO & MUSIC ENGINEERING

http://www.ece.rochester.edu
205 HPN
585-275-5719

Advising meetings:

Contact your advisor directly to set up an appointment to complete your advising forms.  Other questions or additional information, contact Barbara Dick, Academic Coordinator at Barbara.dick@rochester.edu or by calling 585-275-5719.

ENGINEERING SCIENCE & INTERDEPARTMENTAL ENGINEERING

Students not currently assigned to ES or IDE, but who are interested in those programs, should contact the Engineering Advising Office in Lattimore 301.

EAS 141, Basic Machine Fabrication, is a 2-credit, half-semester course only open to freshmen and sophomores next semester. 

"This course will teach students the safe and effective use of basic machine tools such as lathes, mills, band-saws and drill presses. Students will complete a number of projects that utilize these principles. Grades will be based on the successful completion of these projects. A course paper will be a written documentation of the procedures necessary to complete one of the projects done during the class. The paper will be graded on content, organization and clarity.”

ENGLISH

http://www.rochester.edu/college/eng/

www.rochester.edu
Department of English 426 Morey Hall University of Rochester P.O. Box 270451 Rochester, New York 14627-0451 (585) 275-4092 (585) 442-5769 (fax) To receive department ...



Open Advising:

LIT, LMC and THR Tracks (Professor Ezra Tawil) 412 Morey Hall
Tuesday, March 29th, 2:00pm-5:00pm

CW Track (Professor Stephen Schottenfeld) 414 Morey Hall
Monday, March 28th,10:30am-11:30am and Wednesday, March 30th, 9:30am-10:30am

For questions about clusters and any additional information contact Renée Heininger, Administrative Assistant at renee.heininger@rochester.edu or call 275-9255.

Tanenbaum Family Award presentation with UEC
Learn about the 2016 Tanenbaum Family Award for Summer Internship Funding with the Undergraduate English Council! Monday, March 28th from 7-8PM in Wilson Commons 121. Professor Tom Hahn will be talking about the award, its advantages, and the process of application. Joining us will be some of last year's interns sharing their experiences with the award. Pizza and soda provided!

New & Highlighted Courses

ENG 100 Great Books: Welcome to a Strange New Place
Professor William Miller
CRN 81145
MW 900-1015
Your homeward-bound ship is lost at sea. You tumble down a rabbit hole. You wake up one morning to find that you have turned into an enormous beetle. Many of the best (and best-loved) works of the imagination, from The Odyssey to the Alice books to Star Wars, begin with fantastic dislocations, weird transmutations, and unexpected journeys to strange new worlds. And these sudden metamorphoses of place and person provide vehicles for representing some of the profoundest experiences in life: coming-of-age, vocation, revelation, exile, captivity, loving, aging, dying. In this Great Books course, we will experience, ponder, and write about some of the most interesting and influential works of marvelous displacement in literature. Authors include Homer, Ovid, Shakespeare, Francis Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, Jonathan Swift, Daniel Defoe, Olaudah Equiano, Jane Austen, Lewis Carroll, Franz Kafka, Karen Blixen, and Ursula K. Le Guin. We will also view films by Julie Taymor, the Coen Brothers, and Hayao Miyazaki.

ENG 211 Milton
Professor William Miller
CRN 24854
MW 1150-1305
This course will examine the literary career of John Milton, paying special attention to Paradise Lost, his epic poem depicting Satan's temptation of Adam and Eve. Milton thrived as a poet and polemicist during a time (not unlike our own) of political upheaval, religious controversy, and scientific discovery, and we will consider how his writings both reflect and redirect these larger cultural currents. Students will read Milton’s major lyric, epic, and dramatic poetry and a selection of his prose, including his influential attack on state censorship (Areopagitica) and his still-radical defenses of revolutionary action. This course fulfills the Pre-1800 requirement for English majors.

 l 275-9255.

FILM & MEDIA STUDIES

http://www.sas.rochester.edu/fms/
Morey Hall 510/511
585-275-5757
FMS Program Director: Jason Middleton - jason.middleton@rochester.edu
Extended Office Hours: Thursday, March 24 1-4PM
Undergraduate Film Council (UFC) Primary Contact: Sitthipong (Ben) Chomsang - schomsan@u.rochester.edu
The Unedrgraduate Film Council meets Wednesdays at 7:45 in Morey 504

HISTORY

http://www.rochester.edu/college/his/
364 Rush Rhees Library
585-275-2052

Open House - Wednesday, March 30, Rush Rhees Library 370, 3:30-5:30 p.m.,

Students needing guidance regarding History department courses and requirements for majors, minors, and clusters, can meet with the following faculty members:

Ball, Molly

RR 449

X6-7184

mollycball@rochester.edu M, 11:45am-1:45pm

Bakhmetyeva, Tatyana

RR447

X5-3616

tbakhmetyeva@esm.rochester.edu

MW, 12:00pm-1:00pm

Borus, Daniel

RR 452

x5-9356

daniel.borus@rochesster.edu

MF, 11:30am-12:30pm

Brown, Theodore

RR 368

x5-2051

theodore_brown@URMC.rochester.edu

M, 11:00am-1:00pm

Devaney, Thomas

RR 417

x6-6861

thomas.devaney@rochester.edu

T, 2:00pm-3:00pm; R, W, 1:00pm-2:00pm

Hudson, Larry

RR 460

x5-4557

larry.hudson@rochester.edu

W, 4:30pm-6:00pm

Inikori, Joseph

RR 437

x5-9020

inik@mail.rochester.edu

W, 3:00pm-5:00pm

Jarvis, Michael
Director of Undergraduate Studies

RR455

x5-4558

michael.jarvis@rochester.edu

MW, 12:00-1:00pm

Lenoe, Matthew
Department Chair

RR 370

x5-9355

matthew.lenoe@rochester.edu

TR, 12:00-1:45pm

Mandala, Elias

RR 439

x5-2058

elias.c.mandala@rochester.edu

T, 2:00pm-3:00pm

Outram, Dorinda

RR 369A

X5-4097

dorinda.outram@rochester.edu

TR, 11:00am-12:00pm

Rubin, Joan Shelley
Director of Graduate Studies

RR 363

x5-9347

joan.rubin@rochester.edu

W, 2:00pm-4:00pm

Sierra, Pablo

RR 458

x5-8354

pablo.sierra@rochester.edu

R, 12:00-2:00pm

Slaughter, Thomas
Editor, Reviews in American History

RR 369B
RR 369

x3-2799 x3-2802

thomas.slaughter@rochester.edu

T, 1:00-3:00pm

Smoller, Laura

RR 457

x5-7221

laura.smoller@rochester.edu

M, 1:00pm-3:00pm

Weaver, Stewart

RR 461

x5-9348

stewart.weaver@rochester.edu

W, 10:00am-12:00pm

Zhang, Elya

RR 418

x5-9358

elya.zhang@gmail.com

W, 1:00pm-2:30pm

Special Courses Offered Fall 2016:

Stewart Weaver, HIS 139: History of India, TR 11:05-12:20
Laura Smoller, HIS 187: Science, Magic, and the Occult from Antiquity to Newton, MWF 10:25-11:15.
Kyle Robinson, HIS 191: Louis XIV, MWF 9:00-9:50.

You may also phone (585-275-4558) or email Michael Jarvis, Director of Undergraduate Studies in History, at michael.jarvis@rochester.edu with any questions or to set up an appointment.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS/POLITICAL SCIENCE

http://www.rochester.edu/college/psc/undergrad/
Harkness Hall 333
585-275-4291

Advisors are available every day, usually both in the morning and afternoon. No appointments are needed during scheduled office hours. http://www.rochester.edu/college/psc/undergrad/advising_info.php

Professor Niemi niemi@rochester.edu is Director of Undergraduate Studies. For most purposes (advice about courses, signing concentration forms, approving courses taken abroad, cluster approval, etc.), you may see any of the advisors.

LEGAL STUDIES

www.rochester.edu/college/msc/legal-studies.html

The Legal Studies program offers only a minor and two clusters. It is not a pre-law program, but is intended for students who want to incorporate some focus on law into their undergraduate programs.

Authorized Signatures:

R. Curren, x5-8112, Lattimore 527, randall.curren@rochester.edu

K. Doughty, x5-5155, Lattimore 421, kristin.doughty@rochester.edu
J. Dubler, x5-4756, Rush Rhees 428A, joshua.dubler@rochester.edu

LINGUISTICS

http://www.ling.rochester.edu
503 Lattimore Hall
585-275-8053

Solveiga Armoskaite
Linguistics Undergraduate Student Adviser
Lattimore 510
solveiga.armoskaite@rochester.edu

Advising week
Open house at the Department of Linguistics. Are you enjoying linguistics?  Can’t have enought of it?  Have questions about Major, Minor or Cluster options?

Drop by for a chat with Linguistics Undergraduate Advisor Dr. Solveiga Armoskaite and/or Linguistics Peer Advisor, Sara Kowalski in Lattimore Hall Linguistics lounge
Monday, March 28 1-­‐2pm.

Undergraduate Advisor 5-­‐6pm
Peer Advisor Thursday, March 31st 5-­‐6pm
Undergraduate Advisor & Peer Advisor Friday, April 1st 10-­‐11am

Light refreshments provided:
coffee, tea and cookies

MATHEMATICS

http://www.math.rochester.edu
915 Hylan
585-275-4411

The Department of Mathematics has advising at the following times:

Feel free to stop by at these times if you have questions, no appointment is necessary.

Any professor in the mathematics department can sign forms for declaring a mathematics major or minor and can serve as an advisor.

For more information contact:
herman@math.rochester.edu Mark Herman, Director of Undergraduate Studies (Mathematics)
carl.e dot mueller at rochester.edu Carl Mueller, Chair of Undergraduate Committee (Mathematics)
kmadhu@z.rochester.edu, Kalyani Madhu, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies (Mathematics)

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

http://www.me.rochester.edu
235 Hopeman Building
585-275-4753

For more information, contact Ruth Eberlin, Undergraduate Program Coordinator at reberlin@me.rochester.edu or call 5-4753.

Pre-Registration Advising Sessions:

Freshman: Tuesday, March 18th, 12-2pm, ME conference room (Hopeman 224).
Sophomores: Tuesday, March 18th, 12-2pm ME conference room (Hopeman224).

MODERN LANGUAGES & CULTURES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/mlc

585-275-4251

During Advising Week, the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures will be hosting a Pre-Registration Party in Lattimore 401, on Friday, April 1, from 12:00pm – 1:00pm. Faculty will be on hand to discuss course offerings for Summer and Fall 2016. Refreshments will be provided!

 

NEW SUMMER COURSES:

 

FR 154: French in Screen Shorts: Intensive Intermediate French (Julie Papaioannou)

 This course is designed for students who wish to expand and sharpen their listening, speaking, and writing skills in French at the intermediate level. Students will work on major grammatical points and idioms, as well as cultural themes through intensive classwork based on a selection of approximately ten French short films. This summer course is recommended for students who have prior knowledge of French at post-elementary level, or have completed FR 111.

 JPN 228/CLT 298/WST 257: Journey to the Feast: Cuisine and Culture in Modern Japan (David Holloway)

 This four-week intensive and interdisciplinary course explores historical, cultural, economic, and geopolitical aspects of food in Japanese culture. Food and cuisine fill our stomachs, but also identify nations, religious groups, classes/castes and other communities, marking boundaries between ourselves and “Others.” Our class will examine Japanese culinary artifacts, including: the relationship between food and national identity, the ways in which food can be gendered, and how gustatory choices reflect historical and cultural shifts. We will read histories and ethnographies of representative Japanese foods; analyze gender and class dimensions of food; read food through a variety of theoretical lenses; and define and redefine Japan through its culinary pathways.

 

NEW AND REVISED COURSES:

 CHI 113: Introduction to Classical Chinese (Elizabeth Weber)

 Students will become acquainted with the grammar and construction of Classical Chinese language—the written form that prevailed in China for centuries, into the early twentieth century when it was gradually replaced by vernacular writing. Any student interested in conducting original research on China prior to the twentieth century will find the course useful for deciphering older documents and even for reading more recent documents that may be heavily inflected with Classical-style diction. Emphasis will be on learning to read Classical Chinese, but in-class exercises will also include pronunciation and writing in Classical Chinese in order to ensure student comprehension.

 CHI 221/CLT 269: Laborers, Sojourners, Immigrants: Chinese Journeys to the Americas (19th–20th Centuries) (Elizabeth Weber)

 This course will focus on the wide variety of trajectories and circumstances that brought Chinese to the Americas in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the vastly different realities that awaited them in different locations and in different eras. Students will learn about several significant modes of translocation, including: the “coolie trade” to Cuba, Peru, and the British Caribbean in the mid-nineteenth century; “credit-ticket” movement that brought Chinese to the US and other parts of the Americas in the same time period; as well as more recent waves of migration in the twentieth century. Together, we will look at the historic socio-economic factors that spurred these voyages, the experiences of those who underwent them, and the lasting impacts Chinese communities have had on the locations in which they arrived. Readings will be drawn from a variety of fictional and non-fiction sources. Offered in English.

 FR 244/444: Crimes and Passion: Love and Death on the Classical French Stage (Anna Rosensweig)

 Love. Hate. Fear. Disgust. Seventeenth-century tragedies are filled with passion. In this class we will explore what happens when passion goes too far. What happens when lovers cannot contain themselves, or when kings are overcome with rage? How does the problem of excess passion raise questions about freedom and responsibility? In addition to examining how tragedies were performed during the seventeenth century, we will imagine how they might be performed today. We will also consider how concerns raised by seventeenth-century tragedy help us to navigate the political and social issues of our time. The class will be taught in French.

 FR 267/467: Baudelaire: Les Fleurs du mal (Robert Doran)

 Course examines the most famous and influential modern lyric sequence ever written: Charles Baudelaire’s The Flowers of Evil (Les Fleurs du mal, 1857). Explores how Baudelaire’s groundbreaking work—in particular, its focus on urban reality—changed the nature of poetic experience. Walter Benjamin’s writings on Baudelaire will also be studied. Conducted in French.

 FR 270: Women Write Women: Africa and Caribbean (Julie Papaioannou)

 In this course, we will examine the literary production in French from African and Caribbean women writers. A close reading of texts will help us investigate how women writers in the respective areas treat their cultures and societies from the feminine point of view to illustrate, confront, and negotiate patriarchy, tradition, exile, migration, and resist the stereotypical categorization of woman either as a wife and mother, or outcast. Authors include Mariama Bâ, Maryse Condé, Fatou Diome, Assia Djebar, Aminata Sow Fall, Werewere Liking, Calixthe Beyala. A number of films may provide complimentary material to the written texts. Readings, films, and discussions are in French.

 JPN 210/AH 222/CLT 208A/HIS 146: Topics in “Traditional” Japanese Culture (David Holloway)

 This discussion-based course interrogates the construction and evolution of Japan’s cultural traditions and idioms from ancient times to the eve of modernity. Drawing from oral records and mythology, literary and historical texts, and performing and visual arts, among other mediums, this course asks students to understand and appreciate the dynamic contexts of Japanese “tradition.” At the same time, contemporary evocations of the past, as represented through manga and film, will help us understand the processes through which traditions are (re)invented and (re)made. This course is therefore invested in both the historical legacy of traditional Japan and the ways in which tradition itself remains central to contemporary evocations Japanese culture. No prior knowledge of Japan is required or expected.

 KOR 151: Intermediate Korean I (Myounghee Cho)

 In Korean 151, you will continue to expand your knowledge of Korean vocabulary and grammar structures, the development of the writing system and cultural knowledge. It includes authentic texts readings and discussions, as well as writing and engage in and sustain face-to-face conversation with others about topics studied. The terms “lecture” and “recitation” conventionally used to identify the blocks have a purely bureaucratic significance and do not reflect in any way the pedagogical approach of the course. Korean is the primary language of instruction.

 SP 260: (Re)Writing Gender in Spanish-American Literature (Beth Jörgensen)

 This course examines the ways in which 20th-C Spanish-American literature constructs femininity, masculinity and sexuality in dialogue with societal norms. We will study works that reflect normative concepts of gender, and others that critique them, offer alternative constructions, or accomplish all three moves. Authors may include: Teresa de la Parra, María Luisa Bombal, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, Rosario Castellanos, Rosario Ferré, Reinaldo Arenas, Sylvia Molloy, Luis Zapata. Short essays, two one-hour exams. Course taught in Spanish.


MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/MSC/

Multidisciplinary Studies Center
4209B Dewey Hall

American Studies:

www.rochester.edu/college/msc/americanstudies.html
Professor Rubin's Office Hours: Wednesday, March 30, 2:00-4:00pm
Rush Rhees Library 363

Archaeology, Technology, and Historical Structures:
www.rochester.edu/college/ATHS
ATHS Mandatory Advising Session - Friday, March 25, In preparation for registering for the Fall 2016 semester, all ATHS students (majors and minors) must meet with Professor Perucchio, ATHS director, to review their program on Friday, March 25 from 9:00am-1:00pm in Hopeman 415 (Prof. Perucchio's office). This is a walk-in session, you don't need to reserve a time. Please contact Professor Perucchio in advance at rlp@me.rochester.edu to confirm that you will make this meeting.
Program Events:
ATHS Open House - Wednesday, March 23, Art & Music Library (Ground Floor, Rush Rhees Library), 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
**If possible, could we insert the attached ATHS Open House flyer here**

Public Symposium: Analysis and Conservation of Cultural Heritage Monuments: Challenges and Approaches Across Disciplines - Wednesday, March 30, Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library, 3:00 - 6:30 p.m.
**Please note that there will not be an opportunity for program advising at this event.
**If possible, could we insert the attached Analysis and Conservation ... symposium poster here** 
Highlighted Course Offerings:

The discipline of archaeology can make unique contributions to our understanding of urbanism and daily life given its ability to examine long-term processes of development and change. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction and overview of urbanism as exemplified by the indigenous cities of the New World (e.g. Mesoamerica and South America). While regional differences will be discussed, we will focus mainly on identifying the theoretical issues that intersect all of the regions we will be studying.

AH 251/ANT 283/HIS 217: Prehistory of Ancient Peru: The Incas and Their Ancestors

From Machu Picchu to the geoglyphs on the Nasca desert, the Andean region of South America has a long and rich pre-Columbian history. This course will survey the archaeological approaches to understanding the development of Andean cultures that ranges from hunter-gatherers to the Inca Empire. Some of the prehistoric cultures we will be examining include Caral, Chavin, Nasca, Wari, and the Inca. This class will also discuss plant and animal domestication, inequality, gender, ceramics, urbanization, and the rise and fall of states and empires.

Heather Morens

ATH Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm

Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

Professor Renato Perucchio
ATH Program Director
rlp@me.rochester.edu

Office hours: Tuesday, 3:30-4:30 pm; Thursday, 10:00-11:00 am

heather.morens@rochester.edu

Barry Florescue Undergraduate Business Degree Program:

http://www.rochester.edu/college/bsb/index.html

Business Program Academic Advisor
hillary.brower@rochester.edu
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 10:00am-11:30am
Wednesday/Friday, 1:00pm - 3:30pm

To learn about the Business major or Business minor, or to officially declare either program, visit Hillary Brower's walk-in hours in the Multidisciplinary Studies Center.

Digital Media Studies:

http://www.rochester.edu/college/dms/

Heather Morens
DMS Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

Professor Michael Jarvis
DMS Program Director
michael.jarvis@rochester.edu
Office hours: Wednesday, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Rush Rhees 455

For additional information, contact Heather Morens at heather.morens@rochester.edu in 4209B Dewey Hall or call 585-276-5305.

East Asian Studies:
http://rochester.edu/college/msc/east-asian.html
Heather Morens
EST Academic Advisor
heather.morens@rochester.edu
585-276-5305
Office hours: Monday/Thursday, 1:00 - 3:30pm
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:30am

Legal Studies:
www.rochester.edu/college/msc/legal-studies.html

The Legal Studies program offers only a minor and two clusters. It is not a pre-law program, but is intended for students who want to incorporate some focus on law into their undergraduate programs.

Authorized Signatures:

R. Curren, x5-8112, Lattimore 527, randall.curren@rochester.edu
K. Doughty, x5-5155, Lattimore 421, kristin.doughty@rochester.edu
J. Dubler, x5-4756, Rush Rhees 428A, joshua.dubler@rochester.edu
Medieval and Early Modern Studies:

Please contact the Multidisciplinary Studies Center (MSC) at 585-276-5305 for information.

Public Health-Related Programs:

http://www.rochester.edu/college/MSC/publichealth/
Dewey Hall 4209-B
585-276-5305

For more information please contact, jennifer.sherwood@rochester.edu.

Epidemiology and Environmental Health Faculty Adviser

Professor Edwin van Wijngaarden's Office Hours:
Available by appointment
Please contact: edwin_van_wijngaarden@urmc.rochester.edu

Health, Behavior, and Society (HBS) Faculty Adviser

Professor Nancy Chin's Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursdays, 9-10:45 a.m.
Dewey 2-134

contact: nancy_chin@urmc.rochester.edu

Bioethics and Interim Health Policy Faculty Adviser

Professor Richard Dees's Office Hours: Monday, 11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Wednesday, 9:15-10:15 a.m., by appointment
Lattimore 529


Sustainability:

http://rochester.edu/college/msc/sustainability.html

karen.berger@rochester.eduhttps://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rc1aYsFaXwZ9n15O8KUdRg-PJpOogVKiSfNaXZsLRY0/edit?usp=sharing

http://www.rochester.edu/college/MUR/
Dewey 1-316
585-275-9397

Contact Elaine Stroh for any additional information at estroh@ur.rochester.edu or by calling 585-275-9397.

MUSIC & SOUND MINORS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/mas

Program Advisor: Dr. Betsy Marvin
Office: 26 Gibbs Street (Eastman)/Meliora 322
Email: bmarvin@esm.rochester.edu

Undergraduate Coordinator: Melinda Adelman
Office: Meliora 363
Email: madelman@mail.bcs.rochester.edu

Students interested in minors in Music Cognition or Music and Linguistics, or in Music and Sound clusters, can make an appointment with the Undergraduate Coordinator by visiting https://rochesterbcs.youcanbook.me Questions and requests for appointments with Dr. Marvin can also be directed to bmarvin@esm.rochester.edu

http://www.nav.rochester.edu
100 Morey Hall
585-275-9032

To learn more about life in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps or how our classes can be combined with university clusters please come by our office Monday- Friday between 9:00am and 2:00pm. Also you can contact our Executive Officer at xo@mail.rochester.edu or (585) 275-9032.

OPTICS

http://www.optics.rochester.edu
Wilmot Building
585-275-7720

Fall 2016 Optics advising will be held March 28th-April 1st. Students should make an appointment with their respective advisers to arrange next semester's schedule.

For more information contact Daniel Smith, Undergraduate Program Administrator at daniel.smith@rochester.edu or call 275-7764.

PHILOSOPHY

http://www.rochester.edu/college/phl/
525 Lattimore
585-275-8107

Professor FitzPatrick will be holding office hours on Thursday, October 29th, from 1:00-4:00pm, with the last hour (3-4) reserved specially for advising.  Please drop by with any questions you may have about the department, major or minor.

The Undergraduate Philosophy Council meets Fridays, 2-3:30 PM, in Lattimore 501. All are welcome.

For additional information, contact Professor FitzPatrick at william.fitzpatrick@rochester.edu or the department administrator at phladmin@philosophy.rochester.edu or by calling 585-275-4105.

In addition to its typical course offerings, the Department of Philosophy will be offering some new or less commonly taught courses that may be of particular interest, such as:

PHL 260: Topics in Philosophical Theology: Faith

PHL 312: Neuroethics

PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY

http://www.pas.rochester.edu/urpas/page/undergradprograms
203A & 211 Bausch & Lomb
585-275-4937

Students interested in Physics or Physics and Astronomy are more than welcome to set up appointments and may attend the Undergraduate Meeting for Physics/Physics and Astronomy students.

Friday April 1 -12:00-1:30pm Biology-Chemistry-Physics Peer Advising Event in the Green Carpet Lounge. Get questions answered about classes/research/summer/whatever! Stop by and chat with an adviser in any of the three departments. A great time to figure out all of your Natural Science questions.

Monday thru Friday:

Prof. Frank Wolfs, Physics Advisor, wolfs@pas.rochester.edu, B&L 203A, available until the end of the semester.
OR
Prof. Eric Mamajek, Astronomy Advisor, emamajek@pas.rochester.edu, B&L 420 available until the end of the semester.
OR
Linda Cassidy, Undergraduate Program Coordinator, lcassidy@pas.rochester.edu, B&L 211, 9:00am-12:00pm,

For additional information, contact the department at wolfs@pas.rochester.edu and lcassidy@pas.rochester.edu or by calling 5-4937.

POLITICAL SCIENCE/INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/psc/undergrad/
Harkness Hall 333
585-275-4291

Advisors are available every day, usually both in the morning and afternoon. No appointments are needed during scheduled office hours. http://www.rochester.edu/college/psc/undergrad/advising_info.php

Professor Niemi niemi@rochester.edu is Director of Undergraduate Studies. For most purposes (advice about courses, signing concentration forms, approving courses taken abroad, cluster approval, etc.), you may see any of the advisors.

PSYCHOLOGY

http://www.psych.rochester.edu/undergrad/
451 Meliora Hall
585-275-8704

New advising hours: http://www.psych.rochester.edu/undergrad/advising.html

Undergrad Council contacts:
Nathan Nguyen, Co-President nnguy16@u.rochester.edu
Crystal Houston, Co-President chousto2@u.rochester.edu

For additional information contact April Engram at april.engram@rochester.edu.

PUBLIC HEALTH RELATED PROGRAMS

See Multidisciplinary Programs

http://www.rochester.edu/college/ph/index.html
Dewey Hall 4209-B
585-276-5305

For more information contact, jennifer.sherwood@rochester.edu

Jennifer Sherwood: (Undergraduate adviser)

Professor van Wijngaarden: (Epidemiology; Environmenal Health)
Please contact: edwin_van_wijngaarden@urmc.rochester.edu

Professor Brown: (Health, Behavior, and Society; Health Policy)
Please contact: theodore.brown@rochester.edu

Professor Richard Dees: (Bioethics)
Please contact: richard.dees@rochester.edu

Professor Nancy Chin: (Health, Behavior and Society)
Please contact: nancy_chin@urmc.rochester.edu

For more information contact, jennifer.sherwood@rochester.edu.

RELIGION & CLASSICS

http://www.rochester.edu/college/rel/

Emil Homerin
427 Rush Rhees Library
585-275-4760

For information about the Undergraduate Council in Religion and Classics visit the website http://www.rochester.edu/College/REL/council.html.

****NEW COURSE*****

REL 159 – Interfaith Relations: The Globalization of God (4 Credits)

This course is an exploration of the dynamic interactions between people of the diverse religions of the world as religiously pluralistic societies adapt to their multi-faith reality. We study the history of interfaith dialogue globally, nationally and locally with a particular focus on the interfaith movement on college campuses in the United States. We use case studies to examine how religion, politics and culture interact to create opportunities for positive or negative engagement across religious traditions. We study the etiquette of interreligious engagement in multi-religious contexts building skills for global citizenship. Students will be assigned to a community partner organization (e.g. Gandhi Institute, Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue) for hands-on interfaith projects and will attend and observe religious rituals in three world religious traditions.

RUSSIAN STUDIES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/MLC/ug_russian
424 Lattimore Hall
585-275-4176

For additional information, contact Kathleen Parthé, Director of Russian Studies at Kathleen.parthe@rochester.edu or by calling 275-4176.

STATISTICS

http://www.math.rochester.edu
703 Hylan
585-275-4178

For additional information, contact S.R.S. Rao Poduri at raos@math.rochester.edu or by calling 275-4178.

SUSTAINABILITY MINOR

http://rochester.edu/college/msc/sustainability.html

Professor Daniel Reichman’s Office Hours:
Lattimore 439
585-275-8737
Professor Daniel Reichman is available to discuss the sustainability program. Contact him at daniel.reichman@rochester.edu to schedule an appointment.

THEATER

www.rochester.edu/theatre
107 Todd Union
585-275-4959

Nigel Maister - usually available Monday - Friday 11:30am - 6pm
EXCEPT Mon 2-4:40, Wed 2-4:40 and 5-6 and Fri 2-4:40

Gordon Rice - Production Manager
usually available Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm
EXCEPT Mon 10am-12:30pm, Tues/Thurs 11:05am-12:20pm

The EXCEPT are times when Nigel and Gordon are teaching. Any other time, they are pretty flexible.

For additional information, contact Nigel Maister, Artistic Director at nigel.maister@rochester.edu or Katie Farrel, katie.farrell@rochester.edu

WOMEN’S STUDIES

http://www.rochester.edu/college/wst/
538 Lattimore Hall
585-275-8318

To set up an advising appointment or get more information about the Women’s Studies program, contact sbai@rochester.edu or call 275-8318.

Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program

http://writing.rochester.edu
G121 Rush Rhees Library
(585) 273-3584

Open Advising: Our office is open Monday through Friday, 8:00am – 5:00pm for questions and assistance.

For additional information, contact the program at wsap@z.rochester.edu or by calling 273-3584.