19 January 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments

For all you French speakers out there living in NY, this sounds like a really interesting event:

The 100th anniversary of Gallimard
Monday, January 24, 7:00 p.m.

Antoine Gallimard in conversation with Olivier Barrot (in French)

In 1988, Antoine Gallimard became the head of the Editions Gallimard, one of the world’s most prestigious publishing houses. He succeeded his father, Claude Gallimard who, himself, had followed his father, the founder of this venerable enterprise now celebrating its centennial year. Gallimard is a unique, independent house, boasting more Nobel Prize winners and Goncourt Prize novels than any other French publisher. In 22 years at its helm, Gallimard has both followed a singular tradition and kept his company young and forward looking into the 21st century. One of the most respected persons in his industry, Gallimard was elected President of the French National Publishers Syndicate in 2010.

Presented with the additional support of Sofitel, Open Skies, CulturesFrance, and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy.

La Maison Française
New York University
16 Washington Mews (corner of University Place), New York, NY 10003

Florence Gould Event (in French)
A Special Edition of French Literature in the Making

13 February 09 | E.J. Van Lanen | Comments [1]

For those of you who read French, the blog at the Nouvel Observateur has a really cool piece about the history of Gallimard that was written by Antoine Gallimard—the grandson of the founder of Gallimard, Gaston Gallimard, and the company’s current Président et Directeur Général [CEO]:

Un jour, Daniel Pennac a été approché par une maison concurrente. Et l‘éditeur en question lui dit: «Pourquoi restez-vous chez Gallimard? Tout le monde s’en va: Bianciotti, Queffélec» Pennac répond: «Quoi? Tout le monde s’en va? J’aurais donc Gallimard pour moi tout seul? Et vous voudriez que je parte?»

[My bad translation: One day, Daniel Pennac was approached by another publisher. The editor in question said to him: “Why are you staying at Gallimard? Everyone leaves there: Biancotti, Queffélec…” Pennac responded: “What? Everyone leaves Gallimard? So I’ll have them all to myself? And you want me to leave?”]

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