28 June 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Apple still doesn’t recognize paragraph-less books as works of art. For a company obsessed with design and the self-promoted belief that they are the creative industry, they sure don’t have much of an imagination. Actually, it’s way worse than that and points to the overriding flaws in today’s capitalist-scientism ideology that defines, in subtle and not so subtle ways, what we’re allowed to do and think.

Innovation is just a “format error.”

Fuck you, Apple.

Dear University of Rochester,

Your content, Zone, has one or more issues that must be resolved.

Ticket #: 2304611
Ticket Type: Book Asset
Apple ID: **********
Vendor ID: 9781934824832
ISBN: 9781934824832

Changes requested in the ticket were not executed. The ticket has been returned to you for corrections. To resolve this ticket, you must make all the changes requested below and redeliver your content.

Reasons
Full book asset
Formatting
Formatting

The book must contain proper formatting. Paragraph indents or line breaks after paragraphs are required.

The book content must not overlap or lack proper spacing.

Notes

Jun, 27 2013, 2:34 PM – Apple
Issue remains: Please include indents before paragraphs and/or blank lines between paragraphs. See the iBookstore Formatting Guidelines, section 12.8.

Jun, 18 2013, 11:54 AM – Apple
-Please include indents before paragraphs and/or blank lines between paragraphs. See the iBookstore Formatting Guidelines, section 12.8.

We can’t insert things that don’t exist, you morons. Why don’t you go back to worshipping Steve Jobs’s ashes and quit censoring your stupid iBookstore that NO ONE uses.

....
The Indian
The Indian by Jón Gnarr
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

The opening of Jón Gnarr’s novel/memoir The Indian is a playful bit of extravagant ego, telling the traditional story of creation, where the “Let there be light!” moment is also the moment of his birth on January 2nd, 1967. Then. . .

Read More >

Mother of 1084; Old Women; Breast Stories
Mother of 1084; Old Women; Breast Stories by Mahasweta Devi
Reviewed by Christopher Iacono

Mahasweta Devi is not only one of the most prolific Bengali authors, but she’s also an important activist. In fact, for Devi, the two seem to go together. As you can probably tell from the titles, she writes about women. . .

Read More >

Tristana
Tristana by Benito Pérez Galdós
Reviewed by Lori Feathers

The prolific Spanish author Benito Pérez Galdós wrote his short novel, Tristana, during the closing years of the nineteenth century, a time when very few options were available to women of limited financial means who did not want a husband.. . .

Read More >

The History of Silence
The History of Silence by Pedro Zarraluki
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

Pedro Zarraluki’s The History of Silence (trans. Nick Caistor and Lorenza García) begins with the narrator and his wife, Irene, setting out to write a book about silence, itself called The History of Silence: “This is the story of how. . .

Read More >

Flesh-Coloured Dominoes
Flesh-Coloured Dominoes by Zigmunds Skujiņš
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

There are plenty of reasons you can fail to find the rhythm of a book. Sometimes it’s a matter of discarding initial assumptions or impressions, sometimes of resetting oneself. Zigmunds Skujiņš’s Flesh-Coloured Dominoes was a defining experience in the necessity. . .

Read More >

Iraqi Nights
Iraqi Nights by Dunya Mikhail
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

In a culture that privileges prose, reviewing poetry is fairly pointless. And I’ve long since stopped caring about what the world reads and dropped the crusade to get Americans to read more poems. Part of the fault, as I’ve suggested. . .

Read More >

Three-Light Years
Three-Light Years by Andrea Canobbio
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

I would like to pose the argument that it is rare for one to ever come across a truly passive protagonist in a novel. The protagonist (perhaps) of Three Light-Years, Claudio Viberti, is just that—a shy internist who lives in. . .

Read More >