28 June 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Apple still doesn’t recognize paragraph-less books as works of art. For a company obsessed with design and the self-promoted belief that they are the creative industry, they sure don’t have much of an imagination. Actually, it’s way worse than that and points to the overriding flaws in today’s capitalist-scientism ideology that defines, in subtle and not so subtle ways, what we’re allowed to do and think.

Innovation is just a “format error.”

Fuck you, Apple.

Dear University of Rochester,

Your content, Zone, has one or more issues that must be resolved.

Ticket #: 2304611
Ticket Type: Book Asset
Apple ID: **********
Vendor ID: 9781934824832
ISBN: 9781934824832

Changes requested in the ticket were not executed. The ticket has been returned to you for corrections. To resolve this ticket, you must make all the changes requested below and redeliver your content.

Reasons
Full book asset
Formatting
Formatting

The book must contain proper formatting. Paragraph indents or line breaks after paragraphs are required.

The book content must not overlap or lack proper spacing.

Notes

Jun, 27 2013, 2:34 PM – Apple
Issue remains: Please include indents before paragraphs and/or blank lines between paragraphs. See the iBookstore Formatting Guidelines, section 12.8.

Jun, 18 2013, 11:54 AM – Apple
-Please include indents before paragraphs and/or blank lines between paragraphs. See the iBookstore Formatting Guidelines, section 12.8.

We can’t insert things that don’t exist, you morons. Why don’t you go back to worshipping Steve Jobs’s ashes and quit censoring your stupid iBookstore that NO ONE uses.

....
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