30 October 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

The British Centre for Literary Translation—located in Norwich at the University of East Anglia—recently launched a search for a new director. You can get all of the information here, but here’s a brief summary of what sounds like one of the coolest translation-related positions ever:

Apply now for the post of BCLT Academic Director

£45,941 to £53,233 per annum

The School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing is seeking to appoint an Academic Director for the British Centre for Literary Translation.

The Centre is a vital point of intersection between professional translation and academic study, founded in 1989 by W.G. Sebald and supported by the University of East Anglia and Arts Council England.

This is an exciting opportunity to shape the next phase of its development in the context offered by UEA’s internationally famous Creative Writing programme and Norwich’s status as England’s first UNESCO City of Literature.

The Academic Director will be a Senior Lecturer in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, engaging in both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and published research.

The post is available on a full-time indefinite basis from 1 March 2014.

The closing date is 12 noon on 22 November 2013.

And from the job description PDF, here’s a paragraph about the scope of the job:

The Academic Director will be responsible for leading the academic programme of BCLT through teaching, research and organisation, ensuring that the academic and public programmes complement and gain from each other, and acting as advocate for the role and activities of BCLT within UEA. S/he will have particular responsibility for raising BCLT’s academic profile, and developing its academic activity to parallel the well-established outreach programming.

I feel like there’s probably a number of readers of this blog who would qualify for such a position . . .

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