30 August 10 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Some of you might be interested in this announcement regarding the 2011-2012 Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature, which is sponsored by the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture and carries with it $6,000 in prize money.

Last year’s winners were Michael Emmerich for Manazuru by Hiromi Kawakami (it’s a Michael Emmerich day here at Three Percent), and Thomas William Hare for Zeami: Performance Notes by Zeami Motokiyo.

The submission deadline is October 28, 2010, and you can click here to download an application form.

Here’s the list of eligibility requirements:

- The Prize is intended for translators who are not widely recognized for their translations, though they may have published. Those who have previously received the Prize are ineligible.

- Translations must be book-length works of Japanese literature: novels, collections of short stories, literary essays, memoirs, drama, or poetry.

- Translated works submitted for consideration may include: (a) unpublished manuscripts; (b) works in press; © translations published after January 1st, 2009. Translations published prior to January 1st, 2009, are ineligible.

- Previously submitted works are ineligible.

- Applications are accepted from individual translators and from publishers on behalf of eligible translators.

- Translators must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States.

15 December 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Following on the last post about December being a month of year-end donations, it’s also a month of submitting applications and books for a variety of awards. So here’s the first of three posts about various book prizes:

On behalf of the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture at Columbia University, I am pleased to announce that submissions are now being accepted for the 2010 Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature.

For over twenty years, the Keene Center and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission have annually awarded a monetary prize (current annual total: $6,000) to deserving American recipients whose works represent outstanding translation of Japanese literature. We would appreciate your support in making this year’s competition our most successful. A prize in the amount of $3,000 is given for the best translation of a modern work and for the best translation of a classical work, or at times the prize is divided between two equally distinguished translations regardless of category.

To qualify, submissions must be book-length translations of Japanese literature: novels, collections of short stories, literary essays, memoirs, drama, and poetry are all acceptable. Furthermore, all applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States. Submissions are judged on the literary merit of the translation and the accuracy with which it reflects the spirit of the Japanese original. Eligible submissions may include unpublished manuscripts, works in press, or books published within two years of the prize date (works published before January 1, 2008, will not be accepted). Applications may be submitted by individual translators or their publishers. Past winners and previously submitted works are ineligible.

Required application materials include: seven (7) copies of the English translation; one (1) copy of the Japanese original; seven (7) copies of the translator’s CV or resume; and seven (7) copies of the application form. Letters of support or recommendation are also encouraged.

The deadline for submissions for the 2010 Translation Prize is Tuesday, January 19, 2010.

For additional information, please visit the Keene Center Web site..

There you go . . . And stay tuned for info if you’re a publisher/translator of a French book, or someone wanting to get in on the Best Translated Book Award for Poetry . . .

Death by Water
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