15 January 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

From Publishers Weekly:

Dzanc Books, a seven-year-old literary nonprofit publisher headquartered in Ann Arbor, Mich., is starting off the new year by launching a new imprint: DISQUIET. It will be the publisher’s primary imprint for publishing contemporary literature from around the world that has been translated into English. The imprint takes its name from Dzanc’s annual Disquiet International Literary Program, held in Lisbon, Portugal since 2011, which features two weeks of writing workshops, readings, and other literary pursuits for participants.

“The idea behind the writing program in Lisbon is that it got you out of your routine, got you uncomfortable, got you working,” said Dan Wickett, Dzanc executive director and co-publisher. “The imprint is an offshoot of that.” Author and editor Jeff Parker, who has published two books with Dzanc, will be in charge of acquiring and editing titles for the DISQUIET imprint, as well as overseeing their translation into English. Parker is the co-editor of Rasskazy: New Fiction from a New Russia and Amerika: Russian Writers View the United States. He also is co-director of the graduate creative writing program at the University of Toronto.

Two DISQUIET titles are scheduled for release in 2013: European Trash (Sixteen Ways to Remember a Father) by Ulf Peter Hallberg, translated from the Swedish (April) and A True Actor by Jacinto Lucas Pires, translated from the Portugese (Sept.). Sank’ya by Zakhar Prilipen, translated from the Russian, will be published by Dzanc/DISQUIET in February 2014. Each DISQUIET release will include an introduction “by a leading figure” setting the work and its author in context for American readers.

All excellent news all around. And if you have a chance to participate in the DISQUIET International Literary Program, DO IT. It’s a brilliant, and singular, experience.

....
The Seven Good Years
The Seven Good Years by Etgar Keret
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

It’s a rare and wonderful book that begins and ends with violence and humor. At the start of Etgar Keret’s The Seven Good Years, Keret is in a hospital waiting for the birth of his first child while nurses, in. . .

Read More >

Human Acts
Human Acts by Han Kang
Reviewed by J.C. Sutcliffe

Last year, Han Kang’s The Vegetarian was an unexpected critical hit. Now, it’s just been published in the U.S. and has already received a great deal of positive critical attention. The Vegetarian was a bold book to attempt as an. . .

Read More >

Nowhere to Be Found
Nowhere to Be Found by Bae Suah
Reviewed by Pierce Alquist

It’s been almost a year since the publication of Nowhere to Be Found by Bae Suah, but despite being included on the 2015 PEN Translation award longlist, and some pretty vocal support from key indie presses, the book has. . .

Read More >

La paz de los vencidos
La paz de los vencidos by Jorge Eduardo Benavides
Reviewed by Brendan Riley

Jorge Eduardo Benavides’ novel La paz de los vencidos (The Peace of the Defeated) takes the form of a diary written by a nameless Peruvian thirty-something intellectual slumming it in Santa Cruz de Tenerife in Spain’s Canary Islands. Recently relocated. . .

Read More >

Souffles-Anfas: A Critical Anthology
Souffles-Anfas: A Critical Anthology by Various
Reviewed by Emma Ramadan

Anyone with any interest at all in contemporary Moroccan writing must start with Souffles. A cultural and political journal, Souffles (the French word for “breaths”) was founded in 1966 by Abdellatif Laâbi and Mostafa Nissabouri. Run by a group of. . .

Read More >

Berlin
Berlin by Aleš Šteger
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

Randall Jarrell once argued a point that I will now paraphrase and, in doing so, over-simplify: As a culture, we need book criticism, not book reviews. I sort of agree, but let’s not get into all of that. Having finished. . .

Read More >

The Gun
The Gun by Fuminori Nakamura
Reviewed by Will Eells

Like any good potboiler worth its salt, Fuminori Nakamura’s The Gun wastes no time setting up its premise: “Last night, I found a gun. Or you could say I stole it, I’m not really sure. I’ve never seen something so. . .

Read More >