3 February 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments [1]

Launched in 2006, the French Voices program exists to promote contemporary (re: published after 2000) works of French literature. To that end, every year they come out with a list of titles (fiction and non) selected by their international committee that will receive $6,000 translation subsidies.

As you can see from the 2010 list reprinted below (which will be online at their site in the near future), there are a lot of great books here, and a lot of titles that are still seeking an American publisher . . .

For more info on the program, and details on how to apply for 2011 (the deadline is March 1st), please click here.

On to the lists!

Fiction

  • Daewoo, by François Bon, Fayard, 2004 (translation by Alison Dundy & Emmanuelle Ertel) ~ seeking an American Publisher (click here to read a sample, which appeared in Words Without Borders)
  • Corniche Kennedy by Maylis de Kerengal, Editions Verticales, 2008 (translation by Michael Lucey) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Des hommes by Laurent Mauvignier, Editions de Minuit, 2009, (translation by David and Nicole Ball) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Personne by Gwenaëlle Aubry, Mercure de France, 2009 (translation by Trista Selous) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Les Onze by Pierre Michon, Verdier, 2009, to be published by Archipelago Books, (translation by Jody Gladding & Elizabeth Deshays)
  • Mourir, Partir revenir, le jeu des hirondelles by Abirached Zeina, Editions Cambourakis, 2007 (translation by Edward Gauvin) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Mais le Fleuve Tuera l’homme Blanc de Patrick Besson, Fayard, 2009 (translation by Edward Gauvin) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Saisons sauvages by Kettly Mars, Mercure de France, 2010 (translation by Jeanine Herman) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Audimat Circus by Thierry Maugenest, Liana levi, 2007 (translation by David Beardsmore) ~ seeking an American Publisher

Non fiction

  • Démocratie dans quel état? by Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaïd, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Rancière, Kristin Ross, Slavoj Zizek, La Fabrique 2009, published under the title Democracy in What State? by Columbia University Press (translation by Willam McCuaig)
  • Vivre avec: la pensée de la mort et la mémoire des guerres by Marc Crépon, Hermann, 2008 (translation by Michael Loriaux) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Les Islamistes Saoudiens by Stéphane Lacroix, PUF, 2010, to be published by Harvard University Press (Translation by George Holoch)
  • Mangeurs de Viande by Marylène Patou-Mathis, Plon-Perrin, 2009 (translation by George Holoch) ~ seeking an American Publisher

Lots of good stuff here worth checking out . . .

....
The Matiushin Case
The Matiushin Case by Oleg Pavlov
Reviewed by Brandy Harrison

The publisher’s blurb for Oleg Pavlov’s The Matiushin Case promises the prospective reader “a Crime and Punishment for today,” the sort of comparison that is almost always guaranteed to do a disservice to both the legendary dead and the ambitious. . .

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Fear: A Novel of World War I
Fear: A Novel of World War I by Gabriel Chevallier
Reviewed by Paul Doyle

One hundred years have passed since the start of World War I and it is difficult to believe that there are still novels, considered classics in their own countries, that have never been published in English. Perhaps it was the. . .

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Little Grey Lies
Little Grey Lies by Hédi Kaddour
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

In the London of Hédi Kaddour’s Little Grey Lies, translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan, peace has settled, but the tensions, fears, and anger of the Great War remain, even if tucked away behind stories and lies. Directly ahead, as those. . .

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Autobiography of a Corpse
Autobiography of a Corpse by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky
Reviewed by Simon Collinson

One of the greatest services—or disservices, depending on your viewpoint—Bertrand Russell ever performed for popular philosophy was humanizing its biggest thinkers in his History. No longer were they Platonic ideals, the clean-shaven exemplars of the kind of homely truisms that. . .

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A Musical Hell
A Musical Hell by Alejandra Pizarnik
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

The best way to review Alejandra Pizarnik’s slim collection, A Musical Hell, published by New Directions as part of their Poetry Pamphlet series, is to begin by stating that it is poetry with a capital P: serious, dense, and, some. . .

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Astragal
Astragal by Albertine Sarrazin
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

Upon completing Albertine Sarrazin’s Astragal I was left to wonder why it ever fell from print. Aside from the location, Astragal could pass as the great American novel. Its edginess and rawness capture the angst and desires we all had. . .

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Live Bait
Live Bait by Fabio Genovesi
Reviewed by Megan Berkobien

When my eyes first crossed the back cover of Fabio Genovesi’s novel Live Bait, I was caught by a blurb nestled between accolades, a few words from a reviewer for La Repubblica stating that the novel was, however magically, “[b]eyond. . .

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