3 February 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments [1]

Launched in 2006, the French Voices program exists to promote contemporary (re: published after 2000) works of French literature. To that end, every year they come out with a list of titles (fiction and non) selected by their international committee that will receive $6,000 translation subsidies.

As you can see from the 2010 list reprinted below (which will be online at their site in the near future), there are a lot of great books here, and a lot of titles that are still seeking an American publisher . . .

For more info on the program, and details on how to apply for 2011 (the deadline is March 1st), please click here.

On to the lists!

Fiction

  • Daewoo, by François Bon, Fayard, 2004 (translation by Alison Dundy & Emmanuelle Ertel) ~ seeking an American Publisher (click here to read a sample, which appeared in Words Without Borders)
  • Corniche Kennedy by Maylis de Kerengal, Editions Verticales, 2008 (translation by Michael Lucey) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Des hommes by Laurent Mauvignier, Editions de Minuit, 2009, (translation by David and Nicole Ball) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Personne by Gwenaëlle Aubry, Mercure de France, 2009 (translation by Trista Selous) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Les Onze by Pierre Michon, Verdier, 2009, to be published by Archipelago Books, (translation by Jody Gladding & Elizabeth Deshays)
  • Mourir, Partir revenir, le jeu des hirondelles by Abirached Zeina, Editions Cambourakis, 2007 (translation by Edward Gauvin) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Mais le Fleuve Tuera l’homme Blanc de Patrick Besson, Fayard, 2009 (translation by Edward Gauvin) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Saisons sauvages by Kettly Mars, Mercure de France, 2010 (translation by Jeanine Herman) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Audimat Circus by Thierry Maugenest, Liana levi, 2007 (translation by David Beardsmore) ~ seeking an American Publisher

Non fiction

  • Démocratie dans quel état? by Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaïd, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Rancière, Kristin Ross, Slavoj Zizek, La Fabrique 2009, published under the title Democracy in What State? by Columbia University Press (translation by Willam McCuaig)
  • Vivre avec: la pensée de la mort et la mémoire des guerres by Marc Crépon, Hermann, 2008 (translation by Michael Loriaux) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Les Islamistes Saoudiens by Stéphane Lacroix, PUF, 2010, to be published by Harvard University Press (Translation by George Holoch)
  • Mangeurs de Viande by Marylène Patou-Mathis, Plon-Perrin, 2009 (translation by George Holoch) ~ seeking an American Publisher

Lots of good stuff here worth checking out . . .

....
The Indian
The Indian by Jón Gnarr
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

The opening of Jón Gnarr’s novel/memoir The Indian is a playful bit of extravagant ego, telling the traditional story of creation, where the “Let there be light!” moment is also the moment of his birth on January 2nd, 1967. Then. . .

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Mother of 1084; Old Women; Breast Stories
Mother of 1084; Old Women; Breast Stories by Mahasweta Devi
Reviewed by Christopher Iacono

Mahasweta Devi is not only one of the most prolific Bengali authors, but she’s also an important activist. In fact, for Devi, the two seem to go together. As you can probably tell from the titles, she writes about women. . .

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Tristana
Tristana by Benito Pérez Galdós
Reviewed by Lori Feathers

The prolific Spanish author Benito Pérez Galdós wrote his short novel, Tristana, during the closing years of the nineteenth century, a time when very few options were available to women of limited financial means who did not want a husband.. . .

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The History of Silence
The History of Silence by Pedro Zarraluki
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

Pedro Zarraluki’s The History of Silence (trans. Nick Caistor and Lorenza García) begins with the narrator and his wife, Irene, setting out to write a book about silence, itself called The History of Silence: “This is the story of how. . .

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Flesh-Coloured Dominoes
Flesh-Coloured Dominoes by Zigmunds Skujiņš
Reviewed by P. T. Smith

There are plenty of reasons you can fail to find the rhythm of a book. Sometimes it’s a matter of discarding initial assumptions or impressions, sometimes of resetting oneself. Zigmunds Skujiņš’s Flesh-Coloured Dominoes was a defining experience in the necessity. . .

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Iraqi Nights
Iraqi Nights by Dunya Mikhail
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

In a culture that privileges prose, reviewing poetry is fairly pointless. And I’ve long since stopped caring about what the world reads and dropped the crusade to get Americans to read more poems. Part of the fault, as I’ve suggested. . .

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Three-Light Years
Three-Light Years by Andrea Canobbio
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

I would like to pose the argument that it is rare for one to ever come across a truly passive protagonist in a novel. The protagonist (perhaps) of Three Light-Years, Claudio Viberti, is just that—a shy internist who lives in. . .

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