3 January 12 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Over the break, I heard about two great publishing jobs that might interest some of you (and many of my students, former students, and colleagues).

First up, the phenomenal Melville House is hiring a publicist.

Duties include performing all aspects of book publicity, including: designing campaigns; writing press materials; securing coverage; managing pre-publication reviews and publicity; arranging and managing events and tours; maintaining social networking campaigns; daily blogging on our award-winning website; representing the company at events; and raising the company’s profile.

THIS IS NOT AN ENTRY LEVEL JOB. Salary in the mid- to upper-30s plus benefits.

Melville House runs so many amazing publicity campaigns . . . In fact, there might not be a more creative press out there. I can only imagine how much fun this job would be. Anyway, click the link above for the full details.

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At the other end of the spectrum (and yes, I am getting a perverse pleasure out of this juxtaposition), Amazon.com is hiring a publicist to focus on their literary fiction and translations.

The successful candidate will be responsible for promoting Amazon Publishing’s literary fiction and books in translation. In addition to traditional title publicity and demonstrated expertise in the area of literary fiction, the successful candidate must have an eye for innovation: the Publicist will ideate and drive strategies for books to thrive in the digital age, discovering new ways to connect with readers, including engagement through social media and the blogging community.

The successful candidate should be motivated by a start-up culture and the challenge of building a new and exciting business while leveraging the possibilities of a new delivery platform. This role is based in New York City and will require periodic travel.

Core Job responsibilities: – Plan and execute publicity campaigns for a diverse list of books in order to drive sales – Write press materials; pitch and secure top national and local media, including print, broadcast and online outlets – Create and manage media lists and build strong relationships with key media – Collaborate with editorial and marketing teams in order to drive successful title launches

Again, click the link above for all the details.

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