23 November 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

From BoingBoing:

Microsoft is ready to pay Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. to remove its news content from Google, according to the Financial Times. Microsoft has also approached other “big online publishers” with similar deals.

“One website publisher approached by Microsoft said that the plan ‘puts enormous value on content if search engines are prepared to pay us to index with them”,’ wrote the FT’s Matthew Garrahan. “ . . . Microsoft’s interest is being interpreted as a direct assault on Google because it puts pressure on the search engine to start paying for content.”

This he calls a “ray of light to the newspaper industry.”

Now, every site in Google is currently there by choice. As it could conceivably change its mind and shank Balldock and Murmer with fair use, let’s assume that they’re planning on exclusivity. End-user license agreements, paywalls, spider-blocking, that sort of thing. Maybe even encryption and plugins and other delights. Sayonara, RSS!

All I know is that Fox + Microsoft = Very Bad Shit.

25 February 08 | E.J. Van Lanen | Comments

The Library of Congress has decided to use Microsoft’s Silverlight to build their new website. LibraryThing has something to say about it:

Most disturbingly, users are locked in, too: anybody using an iPhone, an old version of Windows, any version of Linux, or any other operating system or device not supported by Silverlight will be unable to use the Library of Congress’ new website. How is that compatible with the principles of democracy or librarianship? It’s taxation without web presentation. And how exactly is that a quantum leap forward?

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