14 August 07 | Chad W. Post | Comments

As the Frankfurt Book Fair grows closer, there’s sure to be more and more articles and events promoting Catalan literature, and as a big fan of the Ramon Llull Institut and Barcelona, I’ll try and share as many as possible. One interesting program I came across today is GeoGraphia: Literary Landscapes:

GeoGraphia is a joint initiative by the Institut Ramon Llull, the Goethe-Institut and Literaturhaus.net to boost knowledge of Catalan and German literature in each other’s countries through an interchange of authors.

Three pairs, each made up of one German and one Catalan writer, will share their experiences on a journey through their respective countries. Acting at the same time as host and guest, native and foreigner, this journey there and back seeks to reveal the ego and the other and their roots, their common culture. During the journey, the writers will appear before audiences in a number of cities in Germany and Austria (at the Literaturhäuser) and in Catalonia, Valencia and Mallorca. The project will be presented at the Frankfurt Book Fair in October 2007.

Should be interesting, especially considering the participating writers: Katja Lange-Müller and Enric Sòria; Keto von Waberer and Carme Riera; and Michael Ebmeyer and Jordí Puntí.

25 June 07 | Chad W. Post |

The July-August issue of World Literature Today—a special issue entitled “Inside China”—is now out, with some of the articles available online.

It’s interesting to me that WLT is focusing on China. Recently, PEN America/Ramon Llull Institut released a special study on Globalization and Translation that included statistics on the number of books translated into English from around the world. As part of the study (which should be available online sometime soon, and when it is, we’ll definitely link to it), there were “Case Studies” from a number of different countries. Including China, which had this chilling statistic:

According to the national statistics, China produces about 110,000 new titles per year. [. . .] But the number of those new titles that were translated into other languages, as far as can be told from an extensive Internet search, was less than 100 titles for 2003. This means about 0.01% of Chinese books are being translated into other languages.

After hearing awful insular statistic after isolationist statistic, I didn’t think anything could shock me. But 0.01%?! Less than 100 titles translated into all other languages throughout the world! The only bright side is that there must be a ton of interesting Chinese titles available for an ambitious press to find . . .

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