6 June 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Copied below is all the information DW Gibson sent me about applying to participate in the Translation Lab that will be going on at the Ledig House this fall. As you can see below, the Translation Lab is a 10-day residency for four English language translators and the four authors that they’re working on. Which is an incredible opportunity. The deadline for applying is July 15th, so get on it!

Translation Lab, Fall 2013

Writers Omi at Ledig House, a part of Omi International Arts Center, has been awarded a grant from Amazon.com to fund Translation Lab 2013, a 10-day special, intensive residency for four collaborating writer-translator teams in the fall of 2013.
Writers Omi will host four English language translators at the Omi International Arts Center for 10 days. These translators will be invited along with the writers whose work is being translated. All text-based projects—fiction, nonfiction, theater, film, poetry, etc.—are eligible.

This focused residency will provide an integral stage of refinement, allowing translators to dialogue with the writers about text-specific questions. It will also serve as an essential community-builder for English-language translators who are working to increase the amount of international literature available to American readers.

The dates for Translation Lab 2013 are November 6-15, 2013. All residencies are fully funded, including airfare and local transport from New York City to the Omi International Arts Center in Ghent, NY. Please note: accepted applicants must be available for the duration of the Translation Lab (November 6-15, 2013). Late arrivals and early departures are not possible. Please do not submit a proposal unless both parties involved (translator and writer) are available for all dates.

Writers Omi will be accepting proposals for participation until July 15, 2013.

Translators, writers, editors, or agents can submit proposals. Each proposal should be no more than three pages in length and provide the following information:

  • Brief biographical sketches for the translator and writer associated with each project

  • Publishing status for proposed projects (projects that do not yet have a publisher are still eligible)

  • A description of the proposed project

  • Contact information (physical address, email, and phone)

Proposals should be submitted only once availability for residency participation of the translator and writer has been confirmed. All proposals and inquiries should be sent directly to DW Gibson, director or Writers Omi at Ledig House at: dwgibson [at] artomi.org.

12 December 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Since February 15th is the deadline for applying for the 2012 Banff International Literary Translation Centre residency program, this seems like a good time to start spreading the word and/or working on your application . . .

For anyone unfamiliar with Banff, here’s the description from their website:

Inspired by the network of international literary translation centres in Europe, the Banff International Literary Translation Centre (BILTC) is the only one of its kind in North America. The primary focus of the residency program is to afford working and professional literary translators a period of uninterrupted work on a current project, within an international community of their colleagues.

The program is open to literary translators from Canada, Mexico, and the United States translating from any language, as well as to international translators working on literature from the Americas (both the North and South American continents). Since the inaugural program in 2003, the Centre has hosted translators from approximately 30 countries translating work involving nearly 40 languages. The annual BILTC residency program has places for 15 translators.

Translators may request a joint residency of up to one week with the author they are translating. Most guest authors come from Canada, the United States, and Mexico, but the program is sometimes able to bring authors from farther away. Consultation with the program directors and experienced translators serving in residence as advisors is also available. Three or four times a week participants meet for informal presentations, workshops, and readings, and to discuss their work in progress with the group.

This year’s faculty will include Roberto Frías, Russell Scott Valentino, Lori Saint-Martin, and others. And anyone planning on participating should plan on arriving in Banff on Sunday, June 3, 2012, and departing on Sunday, June 24, 2012.

Last year, Andrew Barrett—one of the students enrolled in the University of Rochester’s MA in Literary Translation program—was awarded the single invitation given to a U.S. student. The expenses for his trip were covered by Banff, and based on his comments to me afterward, it sounds like this was more or less life changing.

So if you’re at all interested, you should definitely apply. And you can do so by clicking here.

13 January 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments

With the application deadline for this year’s Banff International Literary Translation Center program looming (applications are due February 15th), I thought I’d would be a good time to post a bit of info about Banff, the program, etc.

First off, you can find all the information about Banff by clicking here. As is stated on the website,

the Banff International Literary Translation Centre (BILTC) is the first of its kind in North America. The primary focus of the residency program is to afford literary translators a period of uninterrupted work on a current project, within an international community of translators. Translators may request a joint residency (of up to one week) with a writer, allowing the translator to consult and deepen his or her knowledge of the writer’s intentions and the context of the work being translated. Consultation with the program directors and experienced translators serving in residence as advisors will be available. Three or four times a week participants meet for informal presentations, workshops, and readings, and to discuss their work in progress with the group.

I’ve talked to a number of people who have done this residency, and they all raved about it. The setting sounds spectacular, the opportunity unique, etc.

IMPORTANT NOTE: On the Banff website, it indicates that translators applying for the program have to have published “one book-length literary translation (or equivalent).” This is true for the majority of translators, but if you are a student, this requirement has been waived. Additionally air fare for students will be waived.

With the increase in university translation programs, there should be a lot of great candidates out there . . .

All the application instructions are online, and if you are a student, be sure and indicate that somewhere on your application.

And good luck!

....
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