3 October 17 | Chad W. Post | Comments

This evening, at Volumes Bookcafe in Chicago, Wojciech Nowicki’s U.S. tour for Salki kicks off. A four-city tour spanning the next ten days, this is your one opportunity in 2017 to meet the author of the book about which Andrzej Stasiuk said, “Your skin will crawl with pleasure from reading.”



          Tuesday, October 3rd, 7pm
In Conversation: Wojciech Nowicki & Jan Pytalski w/ Susan Harris

Volumes Bookcafe
1474 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Chicago, IL 60622

*

          Thursday, October 5th, 7:30pm
Reading and Conversation: Wojciech Nowicki & Jan Pytalski

Kosciuszko Foundation
2025 O St. NW
Washington, DC 20036

*

          Tuesday, October 10th, 7:30pm
Memory and Fiction: Wojciech Nowicki’s Salki

University of Rochester
Sloan Auditorium
Goergen Hall
Rochester, NY 14627

*

          Wednesday, October 11th, 7pm
Reading and Conversation: Wojciech Nowicki and Nicole Rudick of The Paris Review

Aēsop
138 West Broadway
New York, NY 10013

*

And here’s a bit more info about the book itself:

Lying in bed in Gotland after a writer’s conference, thinking about his compulsive desire to travel—and the uncomfortable tensions this desire creates—the narrator of Salki starts recounting tragic stories of his family’s past, detailing their lives, struggles, and fears in twentieth-century Eastern Europe. In these pieces, he investigates various “salkis”—attic rooms where memories and memorabilia are stored—real and metaphorical, investigating old documents to better understand the violence of recent times.

Winner of the prestigious Gdynia Literary Award for Essay, Salki is in the tradition of the works of W. G. Sebald and Ryszard Kapuściński, utilizing techniques of Polish reportage in creating a landscape of memory that is moving and historically powerful.

19 April 17 | Chad W. Post | Comments

As you can see below, we’re giving away 15 copies of Nowicki’s Salki via GoodReads. Translated by University of Rochester graduate Jan Pytalksi, Nowicki’s book has been praised by the likes of such literary luminaries as Andrzej Stasiuk, who said, “It all blends here unexpectedly: that past and memory with the present and space. . . . At times, your skin will crawl with pleasure from reading.”

Here’s our description:

Lying in bed in Gotland after a writer’s conference, thinking about his compulsive desire to travel—and the uncomfortable tensions this desire creates—the narrator of Salki starts recounting tragic stories of his family’s past, detailing their lives, struggles, and fears in twentieth-century Eastern Europe. In these pieces, he investigates various “salkis”—attic rooms where memories and memorabilia are stored—real and metaphorical, investigating old documents to better understand the violence of recent times.

Winner of the prestigious Gdynia Literary Award for Essay, Salki is in the tradition of the works of W. G. Sebald and Ryszard Kapuściński, utilizing techniques of Polish reportage in creating a landscape of memory that is moving and historically powerful.

If you’re interested in reading a sample, just click here. Otherwise, if you’re a GoodReads user, you can enter the contest simply and quickly by clicking on the button below. (Although one warning: this is restricted to U.S. residents only. International shipping costs are a beast.)


Goodreads Book Giveaway

Salki by Wojciech Nowicki

Salki

by Wojciech Nowicki

Giveaway ends April 30, 2017.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway


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