27 October 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments

A few years back, I was lucky enough to participate in TyPA’s annual Editor’s Week in Buenos Aires. It was an absolutely amazing experience (which I wrote about here) that involved meeting lots of interesting publishers and writers, learning even more about Argentine literature than I thought possible, and becoming friends with very interesting editors from around the world. This also (to varying degrees) led to our publishing Macedonio Fernandez, Juan Jose Saer, Sergio Chejfec, etc.

Anyway, TyPA is accepting applications from editors to attend their next Editor’s Week, and anyone reading this who works in publishing should definitely apply.

Here’s the info from the press release:

DESCRIPTION:
Ten editors are invited to spend a week in Buenos Aires, where they will listen to talks about contemporary Argentine literature, meet authors, critics and journalists, visit publishing houses, bookstores, cultural centers and the Buenos Aires Book Fair. There will also be special meetings as requested by the participants.
The general grant covers all local costs: lodging, food, urban transportation, etc. There are also a few complete grants, which include air tickets.

WHO SHOULD APPLY:
Publishers and editors working with translated fiction. We may also consider a limited number of applications by translators and critics. Candidates have to be able to read and understand Spanish in order to profit from the visit, since all events will be held in that language.

HOW TO APPLY:
Send a curriculum vitae and a letter explaining why you would like to apply to: letras@typa.org.ar

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS:Friday, November 10, 2011.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF PARTICIPANTS:Monday, December 19, 2011

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CLICK HERE.

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