You are not ashamed of what you do, but of what they see you do. Without realizing it, life can be an accumulation of secrets that permeates every last minute of our routine . . .

The narrative history of José Ovejero’s Nothing Ever Happens lies in its five protagonists (the chapters are titled with the names of the characters; almost everyone gets two chapters to his or her name). Carmela, an excessively independent woman, and her husband Nico, a too gentle man respectively, lead a quiet and comfortable life of middle-class marriage, full of almost imperceptible silences. But the secret of Olivia, their Ecuadorian immigrant housekeeper, could bring down the appearance of normality. Especially with the potential involvement of Claudio, a gifted boy of convoluted ideas who has fun in revealing what is hidden.

As we enter into Nothing Ever Happens, we will find the secrets, sins, and fears of the young couple and Olivia, as well as the activities of Claudio, who, while denouncing the hypocritical vision of an established society order, is not a model of behavior. And Julián, the gardener, who tries to profit from Olivia through the debt she has contracted with him for his help.

Nothing Ever Happens is a humorous book at times, and at times tragic. In it, José Ovejero unfolds his narrative arts (along with the masks of his characters), playing with the idea of “Nothing ever happens around here . . . Or does it?” to dismantle the mechanisms of our good conscience, and to show the underlying conflicts and tensions in a world where appearances rule over reality.


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Nothing Ever Happens
By José Ovejero
Translated by Philip H. D. Smith and Graziella de Luis
Reviewed by Juan Carlos Postigo
324 pages, paperback
ISBN: 978-84-940948-0-4
$16.99
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