19 January 17 | Kaija Straumanis

Three Percent is once again looking to expand its team of reviewers! If you’re interested in reviewing for Three Percent, please contact us at: submissions [at] openletterbooks.org.

We’ve put together a quick list of titles we’d like to have reviewed at this time. Reviewers are not strictly limited to the books listed below; if you would like to review something not listed, please include that in your email! Print copies of the books will be sent to selected reviewers. However, we are currently unable to mail print review-copies for Three Percent internationally. In some cases, electronic files may be available.

If you have previous experience (strongly preferred), please send us a link to some of your work!

Spring 2017

Agnes by Peter Stamm, tr. from the German by Michael Hofmann, Other Press

At Twilight They Return by Zyranna Zateli, tr. from the Greek by David Connolly, Yale University Press

By the River: Seven Contemporary Chinese Novellas, Charles A. Laughlin, Liu Hongtao, Jonathan Stalling, eds., University of Oklahoma Press

Cabo de Gata by Eugen Ruge, tr. from the German by Anthea Bell, Graywolf Press

Confessions by Rabee Jaber, tr. from the Arabic by Kareem James Abu-Zeid and Patrick Creagh, New Directions Press

Fragile Travelers by Jovanka Živanović, tr. from the Serbian by Jovanka Kalaba, Dalkey Archive Press

The Hatred of Music by Pascal Quignard, tr. from the French by Matthew Amos and Fredrik Rönnbäck, Yale University Press

Library of Musical Instruments by Kim Jung-hyuk, tr. from the Korean by Kim Soyoung, Dalkey Archive Press

Luminous Spaces by Olav H. Hauge, tr. from the Norwegian by Olav Grinde, White Pine Press

Melancholy by László F. Földényi, tr. from the Hungarian by Tim Wilkinson, Yale University Press

Moonstone by Sjón, tr. from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb, Farrar, Straus and Giroux

The Other Island of the Songs by María Eugenia Vaz Ferreira, tr. from the Spanish by William F. Blair with Pablo Rodríguez, Song Bridge Press

Revulsion: Thomas Bernhard in San Salvador by Horacio Castellanos Moya, tr. from the Spanish by Lee Klein, New Directions Press

Willful Disregard by Lena Andersson, tr. from the Swedish by Sarah Death, Other Press

You As of Today My Homeland by Tayseer al-Sboul, tr. from the Arabic by Nesreen Akhtarkhavari, Michigan State University Press


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