3 February 11 | Chad W. Post

Launched in 2006, the French Voices program exists to promote contemporary (re: published after 2000) works of French literature. To that end, every year they come out with a list of titles (fiction and non) selected by their international committee that will receive $6,000 translation subsidies.

As you can see from the 2010 list reprinted below (which will be online at their site in the near future), there are a lot of great books here, and a lot of titles that are still seeking an American publisher . . .

For more info on the program, and details on how to apply for 2011 (the deadline is March 1st), please click here.

On to the lists!

Fiction

  • Daewoo, by François Bon, Fayard, 2004 (translation by Alison Dundy & Emmanuelle Ertel) ~ seeking an American Publisher (click here to read a sample, which appeared in Words Without Borders)
  • Corniche Kennedy by Maylis de Kerengal, Editions Verticales, 2008 (translation by Michael Lucey) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Des hommes by Laurent Mauvignier, Editions de Minuit, 2009, (translation by David and Nicole Ball) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Personne by Gwenaëlle Aubry, Mercure de France, 2009 (translation by Trista Selous) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Les Onze by Pierre Michon, Verdier, 2009, to be published by Archipelago Books, (translation by Jody Gladding & Elizabeth Deshays)
  • Mourir, Partir revenir, le jeu des hirondelles by Abirached Zeina, Editions Cambourakis, 2007 (translation by Edward Gauvin) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Mais le Fleuve Tuera l’homme Blanc de Patrick Besson, Fayard, 2009 (translation by Edward Gauvin) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Saisons sauvages by Kettly Mars, Mercure de France, 2010 (translation by Jeanine Herman) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Audimat Circus by Thierry Maugenest, Liana levi, 2007 (translation by David Beardsmore) ~ seeking an American Publisher

Non fiction

  • Démocratie dans quel état? by Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaïd, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Rancière, Kristin Ross, Slavoj Zizek, La Fabrique 2009, published under the title Democracy in What State? by Columbia University Press (translation by Willam McCuaig)
  • Vivre avec: la pensée de la mort et la mémoire des guerres by Marc Crépon, Hermann, 2008 (translation by Michael Loriaux) ~ seeking an American Publisher
  • Les Islamistes Saoudiens by Stéphane Lacroix, PUF, 2010, to be published by Harvard University Press (Translation by George Holoch)
  • Mangeurs de Viande by Marylène Patou-Mathis, Plon-Perrin, 2009 (translation by George Holoch) ~ seeking an American Publisher

Lots of good stuff here worth checking out . . .


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