14 November 13 | Chad W. Post

A couple weeks ago, Words Without Borders celebrated their 10th year with a baller fundraising gala where Drenka Willen received the inaugural James H. Ottaway, Jr. Award for the Promotion of International Literature. (The best write-up about this, and about Drenka in general, is the one Sal Robinson wrote for MobyLives. Sal rocks.)

Here is a picture from the party. And yes, that is Susan Harris with J-Franz.


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