14 April 08 | Chad W. Post

Just got a press release about new funding available for the translation of academic German books into English.

With Geisteswissenschaften International: Translation Funding for Humanities and Social Sciences from Germany, the German Publishers & Booksellers Association (Börsenverein des Deutschen Buchhandels), the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and the German Federal Foreign Office will now reward innovative academic works on humanities and social sciences written in German by providing funding for the translation of such works into English.

The aim is to support a wider international dissemination of academic research results from Germany and at the same time, to uphold German as an academic language and the language of first publications of works on humanities and social sciences. Geisteswissenschaften International aims to strengthen Germany as an educational and academic base. “Cultural and intellectual understanding within worldwide academic society is the aim of many translations at this time. With Geisteswissenschaften International, we hope to strengthen the participation of German-language academic works in international academic discourse,” said Dr. Gottfried Honnefelder, president of the Börsenverein des Deutschen Buchhandels, foreign minister Dr. Frank-Walter Steinmeier, and chairman of the Fritz Thyssen Foundation committee, Dr. Manfred Schneider, as they welcomed the undertaking.

Applications will be accepted from publishing companies with academic publications in the fields of humanities and social sciences. They should submit their own selection of titles for which rights option agreement is already in place, and provide a brief summary of the reasons for their selection. The amount of funding will depend on each individual case and the actual translation costs.

Application deadline for this round is June 1st. And more info is available here.


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