RSS Feed | Eastman Events Calendar Daily update from the Eastman Events Calendar http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar (c)2017 University of Rochester Going for Baroque http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1132188 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1132188 Memorial Art Gallery Fountain Court 1498410000 1498411800 Enjoy a 25-minute presentation and mini-recital on the Italian Baroque organ by students at the Eastman School of Music.

Repeated at 3 pm.
Included in museum admission. 
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Going for Baroque http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1151570 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1151570 Eastman School - Off Campus Memorial Art Gallery 1498410000 1498411800 Going for Baroque http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1132240 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1132240 Memorial Art Gallery Fountain Court 1498417200 1498419000 Enjoy a 25-minute presentation and mini-recital on the Italian Baroque organ by students at the Eastman School of Music.

Included in museum admission.   ]]>
Going for Baroque http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1151557 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1151557 Eastman School - Off Campus Memorial Art Gallery 1498417200 1498419000 Rochester International Jazz Festival - Kristian Blak http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928426 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928426 Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall 1498427100 1498430700

 

Kristian's diverse musical background is reflected in the wide array of music he composes, uniting ethnic music with new compositional techniques.

Born in the Danish peninsula of Jutland in 1947, Kristian relocated to the Faroe Islands in '74, where he's lived ever since, and where he's written the majority of his works.

​Kristian has composed solo instrumental works, chamber music choral works as well as symphonic music, such as the ballet Harra Pætur og Elinborg.

Having made numerous recordings as a performer, Kristian has also toured the globe widely with his own jazz and folk music ensembles.

In addition to this, Kristian works as manager and CEO of the Tutl Records label and is artistic director of the popular Summartónar festival.

Kristian Blak is widely regarded as one of the most prominent and important figures of Faroese music history, playing a central role in the musical life and culture of the islands.

 

For more information please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=242

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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Bill Frisell & Thomas Morgan http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928433 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928433 Eastman School, Kilbourn Hall 1498428000 1498431600  

Over the years, Frisell has contributed to the work of such collaborators as Paul Motian, John Zorn, Elvis Costello, Ginger Baker, The Los Angeles Philharmonic, Suzanne Vega, Loudon Wainwright III, Van Dyke Parks, Vic Chesnutt, Rickie, Lee Jones, Ron Sexsmith, Vinicius Cantuaria, Marc Johnson (in "Bass Desires"), Ronald Shannon Jackson and Melvin Gibbs (in "Power Tools"), Marianne Faithful, John Scofield, Jan Garbarek, Lyle Mays, Vernon Reid, Julius Hemphill, Paul Bley, Wayne Horvitz, Hal Willner, Robin Holcomb, Rinde Eckert, The Frankfurt Ballet, film director Gus Van Sant, David Sanborn, David Sylvian, Petra Haden and numerous others, including Bono, Brian Eno, Jon Hassell and Daniel Lanois on the soundtrack for Wim Wenders’ film Million Dollar Hotel.

This work has established Frisell as one of the most sought-after guitar voices in contemporary music. The breadth of such performing and recording situations is a testament not only to his singular guitar conception, but his musical versatility as well. This, however, is old news by now. In recent years, it is Frisell's role as composer and band leader which has garnered him increasing notoriety.

"For over ten years Bill Frisell has quietly been the most brilliant and unique voice to come along in jazz guitar since Wes Montgomery. In light of this, it may be easy to overlook the fact that he may also be one of the most promising composers of American music on the current scene." - Stereophile

"Bill Frisell is the Clark Kent of the electric guitar. Soft-spoken and self-effacing in conversation, he apparently breathes in lungfuls of raw fire when he straps on his (guitar)...His music is not what is typically called jazz, though it turns on improvisation; it's not rock'n roll; and it sure ain't that tired dinosaur called fusion. In one of the biggest leaps of imagination since the Yardbirds and Jimi Hendrix, Frisell coaxes and slams his hovering split-toned ax into shapes of things to come...But besides being a guitar genius, he's turned into a terrific songwriter. Like Monk, Frisell's harmonic and melodic ideas form a succinct, seamless mesh with outer sonic and rhythmic ideas about his ax." - Spin

"Frisell just has a knack for coaxing the most inviting sounds out of the instrument, and the composition skills to put them in just the right order. Combine a Colorado youth given to soul and C&W with solid jazz training, abetted by a decade-long residency in the heart of NYC's avant scene, multiplied by a fun factor of X (he has scored Buster Keaton's films) and you've got a recipe damn near perfection." - The Mirror

Wire, the British music publication has observed: "What's really distinctive is Frisell's feel for the shape of songs, for their architecture; it's a virtuosity of deep structure rather than surface." Bill explains this sensibility to Guitar Player, "For me, it's really important to keep the melody going all the time, whether you are actually playing it or not, especially when it's some kind of standard tune or familiar song form. A lot of people play the melody and rush right into their solo, almost with an attitude of 'Whew - that's out of the way, now let's really play!' Then they just burn on chord changes, and it doesn't relate to the song anymore. I like to keep that melody going. When you hear Thelonious Monk's piano playing - or horn players like Ben Webster, Miles Davis and Wayne Shorter - you always hear the melody in there. Sonny Rollins is the classic example of that - I've read that he thinks of the words while he's playing the sax, so the song really means something to him. It's not just an excuse to play a bunch of licks over chord changes."

Much has been made of the uncategorizable nature of Frisell's music and the seamlessness with which his bands have navigated such a variety of styles. "Frisell's pals just happen to be superb musical chameleons, up to every change of gears and genre the guitarist's catch-all music throws at them. The band even comfortably follows the leader onto Country and Western turf, as Frisell often approximates the whine of a lonely steel guitar." Minneapolis Star Tribune. Bill's comments to the same publication: "When I was in Colorado, I never really played that country stuff or even liked it that much, though it was all over the radio. But as I got older, it crept into my music a lot." In fact, the Chicago Tribune observed that "Frisell possesses not only impressive compositional skills but also a remarkable ability to encompass seemingly antagonistic musical genres." Commenting on his eclectic compositional inclinations, Frisell told Down Beat: "When I write something, it just sort of comes out. I'm not thinking, 'Now I'm going to write a cowboy song'. It just happens, then I usually think about what must have influenced it later. When I sit down to write something in a certain style, it doesn't work. I don't know if that's important or something I need to do, or if it doesn't matter. I don't care; I'm just thankful something comes out sometimes."

This musical kinship with Miles Davis has been cited repeatedly in the music press. The New Yorker notes: "Bill Frisell plays the guitar like Miles Davis played the trumpet: in the hands of such radical thinkers, their instruments simply become different animals. And, like Davis, Frisell loves to have a lot of legroom when he improvises--the space that terrifies others quickens his blood."

On this subject Down Beat has noted: "With his respectful if improbable eclecticism and audible ethnic guitar roots, Frisell is the new music's Ry Cooder...His engagingly droll sense of humor is never far from the surface; no one else's persistent dissonances sound so consistently congenial.

Sometimes using delays and distortion and an unmistakably unique touch, Frisell, as Jazz Times once observed "has an airbrushed attack, a stunning timbral palette and a seemingly innate inability to produce a gratuitous note." Musician has described his guitar style as "modern in the best sense of the word, straddling the electronic ambiance and distortion of contemporary rock and the nuances of touch and harmonic sophistication usually associated with jazz." The guitarist won the 1990 Down Beat critics' poll.

"The electric guitar sound of the decade - oozing, cloudy enveloping - belongs to jazz renegade Bill Frisell - Like the best artists in any field, Frisell is not a slave to his tools; he's the creator who gives them new validity...His guitar sound is unmistakable - billowing, breathlike, multi-hued, immense at times, almost palpable. Frisell's music is accessible and avant-garde, a lyrical victory of man over machine, of personality over mechanics, of message over mathematics." - Minneapolis Star Tribune

 

 

Thomas Morgan was born in Hayward, California, in 1981 and began studying the cello at the age of seven. He continued until the age of fourteen, when his attention turned to the double bass. In 2003 Morgan completed a bachelor of music at the Manhattan School of Music, where he studied with Harvie S and Garry Dial. He has also studied with Ray Brown and Peter Herbert. Thomas has recorded and played concerts in New York and abroad with such artists as David Binney, Steve Coleman, Joey Baron, Masabumi Kikuchi, Terumasa Hino, Dan Weiss, Craig Taborn, Tyshawn Sorey, Donny McCaslin, Brad Shepik, Steve Cardenas, Kenny Wollesen, Gerald Cleaver, Adam Rogers, and Kenny Werner.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=191
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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Derek Gripper http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928430 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928430 Eastman School Miller Center Sproull Atrium 1498428900 1498432500  

South African guitarist Derek Gripper released his ninth album, One Night on Earth: Music from the Strings of Mali, late in 2012. Recorded at an all-night session the album magically conjures anew a centuries-old ancient African musical heritage, interpreting kora compositions (21 string harp) on solo guitar, a feat which classical guitar legend John Williams said he thought was "absolutely impossible until I heard Derek Gripper do it." When Kora maestro Toumani Diabate heard these recordings he asked his producer Lucy Duran to confirm that she had actually seen one person play this music on just one guitar. He immediately invited Derek to collaborate with him in Mali, an invitation which saw Derek performing at the Acoustik Festival Bamako in early 2016, the first international festival held in Mali since 2012.

The UK's top world music publication, Songlines, called One Night on Earth "a staggering achievement," and selected the recording as a Top of the World album in 2013. Derek's "guitar has found the Kora-playing spirit, he captures the magic bound up in the way it is played", says Williams, who invited Derek back a second time to collaborate in "The John Williams Series" at London's Globe Theatre in June 2015 where the two musicians performed duets based on Diabate's kora works.

Libraries on Fire, a new record of kora compositions has just been completed, exploring kora duets on solo guitar. The Kronos Quartet have also premiered one of Derek's arrangements for string quartet, continuing Derek's work to bring "African guitar into the classical mainstream." (Evening Standard)

"Five stars…Gripper has brilliantly transferred [the kora] repertoire onto a regular six string guitar. He sees [Toumani] Diabaté as the Segovia, or indeed John Williams, of the kora, championing it as a solo instrument. And Gripper brilliantly takes it back to the guitar. He's opening a whole new repertoire of classical guitar music…bringing African guitar into the classical mainstream." [Simon Broughton]

"Gripper has cracked it…his playing has a depthless beauty, which does full justice to the complexity of Toumani's compositions. To do so without any hint of the music being dumbed down is a staggering achievement on solo guitar." [Nigel Williamson, Songlines Magazine]

"More than a labour of love, Gripper has brought a new purity to the dream-like improvisatory nature of these compositions. My recording of the year, so far!" [Tim Panting, Classical Guitar Magazine]

"The result is astounding, not just for its technical brilliance, but its musicality. Gripper executes these pieces with the precision and attention to detail one might expect from a great classical musician…It's hard to imagine a more impressive and passionate rendering of Malian music on classical guitar." [Banning Eyre, Afropop Worldwide]

"A true synthesis and a great album." [Ian Kearey, fRoots]

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=200
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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Kristian Blak http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928427 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928427 Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall 1498434300 1498437900  

Kristian's diverse musical background is reflected in the wide array of music he composes, uniting ethnic music with new compositional techniques.

Born in the Danish peninsula of Jutland in 1947, Kristian relocated to the Faroe Islands in '74, where he's lived ever since, and where he's written the majority of his works.

​Kristian has composed solo instrumental works, chamber music choral works as well as symphonic music, such as the ballet Harra Pætur og Elinborg.

Having made numerous recordings as a performer, Kristian has also toured the globe widely with his own jazz and folk music ensembles.

In addition to this, Kristian works as manager and CEO of the Tutl Records label and is artistic director of the popular Summartónar festival.

Kristian Blak is widely regarded as one of the most prominent and important figures of Faroese music history, playing a central role in the musical life and culture of the islands.

 

For more information please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=242
]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Bill Frisell & Thomas Morgan http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928432 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928432 Eastman School, Kilbourn Hall 1498438800 1498442400  

Over the years, Frisell has contributed to the work of such collaborators as Paul Motian, John Zorn, Elvis Costello, Ginger Baker, The Los Angeles Philharmonic, Suzanne Vega, Loudon Wainwright III, Van Dyke Parks, Vic Chesnutt, Rickie, Lee Jones, Ron Sexsmith, Vinicius Cantuaria, Marc Johnson (in "Bass Desires"), Ronald Shannon Jackson and Melvin Gibbs (in "Power Tools"), Marianne Faithful, John Scofield, Jan Garbarek, Lyle Mays, Vernon Reid, Julius Hemphill, Paul Bley, Wayne Horvitz, Hal Willner, Robin Holcomb, Rinde Eckert, The Frankfurt Ballet, film director Gus Van Sant, David Sanborn, David Sylvian, Petra Haden and numerous others, including Bono, Brian Eno, Jon Hassell and Daniel Lanois on the soundtrack for Wim Wenders’ film Million Dollar Hotel.

This work has established Frisell as one of the most sought-after guitar voices in contemporary music. The breadth of such performing and recording situations is a testament not only to his singular guitar conception, but his musical versatility as well. This, however, is old news by now. In recent years, it is Frisell's role as composer and band leader which has garnered him increasing notoriety.

"For over ten years Bill Frisell has quietly been the most brilliant and unique voice to come along in jazz guitar since Wes Montgomery. In light of this, it may be easy to overlook the fact that he may also be one of the most promising composers of American music on the current scene." - Stereophile

"Bill Frisell is the Clark Kent of the electric guitar. Soft-spoken and self-effacing in conversation, he apparently breathes in lungfuls of raw fire when he straps on his (guitar)...His music is not what is typically called jazz, though it turns on improvisation; it's not rock'n roll; and it sure ain't that tired dinosaur called fusion. In one of the biggest leaps of imagination since the Yardbirds and Jimi Hendrix, Frisell coaxes and slams his hovering split-toned ax into shapes of things to come...But besides being a guitar genius, he's turned into a terrific songwriter. Like Monk, Frisell's harmonic and melodic ideas form a succinct, seamless mesh with outer sonic and rhythmic ideas about his ax." - Spin

"Frisell just has a knack for coaxing the most inviting sounds out of the instrument, and the composition skills to put them in just the right order. Combine a Colorado youth given to soul and C&W with solid jazz training, abetted by a decade-long residency in the heart of NYC's avant scene, multiplied by a fun factor of X (he has scored Buster Keaton's films) and you've got a recipe damn near perfection." - The Mirror

Wire, the British music publication has observed: "What's really distinctive is Frisell's feel for the shape of songs, for their architecture; it's a virtuosity of deep structure rather than surface." Bill explains this sensibility to Guitar Player, "For me, it's really important to keep the melody going all the time, whether you are actually playing it or not, especially when it's some kind of standard tune or familiar song form. A lot of people play the melody and rush right into their solo, almost with an attitude of 'Whew - that's out of the way, now let's really play!' Then they just burn on chord changes, and it doesn't relate to the song anymore. I like to keep that melody going. When you hear Thelonious Monk's piano playing - or horn players like Ben Webster, Miles Davis and Wayne Shorter - you always hear the melody in there. Sonny Rollins is the classic example of that - I've read that he thinks of the words while he's playing the sax, so the song really means something to him. It's not just an excuse to play a bunch of licks over chord changes."

Much has been made of the uncategorizable nature of Frisell's music and the seamlessness with which his bands have navigated such a variety of styles. "Frisell's pals just happen to be superb musical chameleons, up to every change of gears and genre the guitarist's catch-all music throws at them. The band even comfortably follows the leader onto Country and Western turf, as Frisell often approximates the whine of a lonely steel guitar." Minneapolis Star Tribune. Bill's comments to the same publication: "When I was in Colorado, I never really played that country stuff or even liked it that much, though it was all over the radio. But as I got older, it crept into my music a lot." In fact, the Chicago Tribune observed that "Frisell possesses not only impressive compositional skills but also a remarkable ability to encompass seemingly antagonistic musical genres." Commenting on his eclectic compositional inclinations, Frisell told Down Beat: "When I write something, it just sort of comes out. I'm not thinking, 'Now I'm going to write a cowboy song'. It just happens, then I usually think about what must have influenced it later. When I sit down to write something in a certain style, it doesn't work. I don't know if that's important or something I need to do, or if it doesn't matter. I don't care; I'm just thankful something comes out sometimes."

This musical kinship with Miles Davis has been cited repeatedly in the music press. The New Yorker notes: "Bill Frisell plays the guitar like Miles Davis played the trumpet: in the hands of such radical thinkers, their instruments simply become different animals. And, like Davis, Frisell loves to have a lot of legroom when he improvises--the space that terrifies others quickens his blood."

On this subject Down Beat has noted: "With his respectful if improbable eclecticism and audible ethnic guitar roots, Frisell is the new music's Ry Cooder...His engagingly droll sense of humor is never far from the surface; no one else's persistent dissonances sound so consistently congenial.

Sometimes using delays and distortion and an unmistakably unique touch, Frisell, as Jazz Times once observed "has an airbrushed attack, a stunning timbral palette and a seemingly innate inability to produce a gratuitous note." Musician has described his guitar style as "modern in the best sense of the word, straddling the electronic ambiance and distortion of contemporary rock and the nuances of touch and harmonic sophistication usually associated with jazz." The guitarist won the 1990 Down Beat critics' poll.

"The electric guitar sound of the decade - oozing, cloudy enveloping - belongs to jazz renegade Bill Frisell - Like the best artists in any field, Frisell is not a slave to his tools; he's the creator who gives them new validity...His guitar sound is unmistakable - billowing, breathlike, multi-hued, immense at times, almost palpable. Frisell's music is accessible and avant-garde, a lyrical victory of man over machine, of personality over mechanics, of message over mathematics." - Minneapolis Star Tribune

 

 

Thomas Morgan was born in Hayward, California, in 1981 and began studying the cello at the age of seven. He continued until the age of fourteen, when his attention turned to the double bass. In 2003 Morgan completed a bachelor of music at the Manhattan School of Music, where he studied with Harvie S and Garry Dial. He has also studied with Ray Brown and Peter Herbert. Thomas has recorded and played concerts in New York and abroad with such artists as David Binney, Steve Coleman, Joey Baron, Masabumi Kikuchi, Terumasa Hino, Dan Weiss, Craig Taborn, Tyshawn Sorey, Donny McCaslin, Brad Shepik, Steve Cardenas, Kenny Wollesen, Gerald Cleaver, Adam Rogers, and Kenny Werner.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=191

]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Derek Gripper http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928431 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928431 Eastman School Miller Center Sproull Atrium 1498442400 1498446000

 

South African guitarist Derek Gripper released his ninth album, One Night on Earth: Music from the Strings of Mali, late in 2012. Recorded at an all-night session the album magically conjures anew a centuries-old ancient African musical heritage, interpreting kora compositions (21 string harp) on solo guitar, a feat which classical guitar legend John Williams said he thought was "absolutely impossible until I heard Derek Gripper do it." When Kora maestro Toumani Diabate heard these recordings he asked his producer Lucy Duran to confirm that she had actually seen one person play this music on just one guitar. He immediately invited Derek to collaborate with him in Mali, an invitation which saw Derek performing at the Acoustik Festival Bamako in early 2016, the first international festival held in Mali since 2012.

The UK's top world music publication, Songlines, called One Night on Earth "a staggering achievement," and selected the recording as a Top of the World album in 2013. Derek's "guitar has found the Kora-playing spirit, he captures the magic bound up in the way it is played", says Williams, who invited Derek back a second time to collaborate in "The John Williams Series" at London's Globe Theatre in June 2015 where the two musicians performed duets based on Diabate's kora works.

Libraries on Fire, a new record of kora compositions has just been completed, exploring kora duets on solo guitar. The Kronos Quartet have also premiered one of Derek's arrangements for string quartet, continuing Derek's work to bring "African guitar into the classical mainstream." (Evening Standard)

"Five stars…Gripper has brilliantly transferred [the kora] repertoire onto a regular six string guitar. He sees [Toumani] Diabaté as the Segovia, or indeed John Williams, of the kora, championing it as a solo instrument. And Gripper brilliantly takes it back to the guitar. He's opening a whole new repertoire of classical guitar music…bringing African guitar into the classical mainstream." [Simon Broughton]

"Gripper has cracked it…his playing has a depthless beauty, which does full justice to the complexity of Toumani's compositions. To do so without any hint of the music being dumbed down is a staggering achievement on solo guitar." [Nigel Williamson, Songlines Magazine]

"More than a labour of love, Gripper has brought a new purity to the dream-like improvisatory nature of these compositions. My recording of the year, so far!" [Tim Panting, Classical Guitar Magazine]

"The result is astounding, not just for its technical brilliance, but its musicality. Gripper executes these pieces with the precision and attention to detail one might expect from a great classical musician…It's hard to imagine a more impressive and passionate rendering of Malian music on classical guitar." [Banning Eyre, Afropop Worldwide]

"A true synthesis and a great album." [Ian Kearey, fRoots]

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=200

]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival: Jae Sinnett Jazz Workshop http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133775 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133775 Eastman School Ray Wright Room 1498496400 1498501800
 Jae Sinnett Jazz Workshop
 
 XRIJF Jazz Workshops for Young Music Students

FREE

~Sponsored by Wegmans~

No registration is required.

Attend one or more days.

Open to all grade school and high school music students.

This series of five structured jazz workshops gives young music students the exceptional opportunity to play and meet, listen to and learn from professional jazz musicians performing at the festival. It is hosted by Bob Sneider, Eastman School of Music Assistant Professor of Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media and Senior Instructor of Jazz Guitar, and led by five musicians performing at XRIJF.

ABOUT JAE SINNETT, DRUMS

Jae Sinnett is a musical visionary and a man of extraordinary talent. He is a consummate drummer, composer, and band leader who has produced 14 recordings – the first of which was released in 1986. His most recent recording – Zero to 60 – was released in February 2016.

Jae has written over 250 compositions. He has also scored music for five documentaries – one of which (John Biggers: Stories of Illumination) was aired on PBS. Jae's dream of having his trio perform with the Virginia Symphony Orchestra was realized on Oct. 10, 2014. The performance was met with outstanding reviews.

Jae's other professional life places him as approaching his 27th year as jazz producer/host for NPR affiliate WHRV-FM 89.5 in Norfolk, VA. Jae hosts the popular jazz show Sinnett in Session Monday through Thursday evenings from 9 pm to 1 am and Sunday afternoons from 1-5 pm. He also hosts The R&B Chronicles, heard Friday evenings at 7 pm. Both shows can be heard on demand.

Jae is a prolific fundraiser for his commercial-free radio station. In 1998, he was nominated for the Gavin Jazz Programmer of the Year award by his peers in the industry. As a jazz educator, Jae taught history, theory and percussion at the Governor's School for the Arts in Norfolk, VA for eight years. He also directed the GSA Big Band and Jazz Combos. He was an adjunct drum set and jazz ensemble instructor at Christopher Newport University in Newport News, VA. Jae attended Norfolk State and Old Dominion Universities as a music education major. His instruments of choice are Sonor Designer and Delite Series Drums and Sabian Cymbals. He is a veteran clinician and educator.

Jae's quartet for Zero to 60 consists of saxophonist Ralph Bowen, bassist Terry Burrell, and pianist Allen Farnham.

 

For more information please visit: http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=328

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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Harold Danko http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928439 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928439 Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall 1498513500 1498517100  

Harold Danko is well recognized from long-term associations with impressive jazz legends including Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan, Thad Jones/Mel Lewis, Lee Konitz and Woody Herman, in performances at major jazz venues throughout the world as well as on recordings, television and video. During the last two decades he has become increasingly known as a band leader, composer, and solo pianist, and is well documented in those capacities on more than thirty CDs on the SteepleChase and SunnySide labels.

As a leader he has been featured at the Rochester International Jazz Festival, Lincoln Center's "Meet the Artist" series, Washington DC Performing Arts Society series at J.F.K. Center, and numerous jazz festivals both in the USA and abroad. Throughout the 1990's he performed with and composed for his quartet with Rich Perry (tenor saxophone), Scott Colley (bass) and Jeff Hirshfield (drums), and in 1995 received an NEA Fellowship to perform his own works in a series of concerts in New York City. More recently he has led a trio with Hirshfield and Michael Formanek or Jay Anderson (bass) in addition to adapting many of his compositions for solo piano performance. He recently returned from a professional leave of absence in the fall of 2011, during which he taught and performed in Taiwan, Italy, and Switzerland, in addition to work on two new recording projects. His latest trio CD, released in 2012, is "Unriched" on SteepleChase.

Professor Danko has been on the faculty of the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, since 1998 and served as Jazz Studies Chair from 2002 – 2011. Prior to his appointment at Eastman he served on the faculties of the Manhattan School of Music, the New School/Mannes, Hartt College, and other institutions. Beginning his piano studies at the age of five, Harold became serious about pursuing a career in jazz at the age of fifteen when he commenced studies with Gene Rush in Youngstown, Ohio. After graduation from Youngstown State University and a stint in the U.S. Army band, Harold landed the piano chair in Woody Herman's Thundering Herd, which launched his career as a much sought after jazz musician. He also developed a reputation as a respected jazz educator in New York City and throughout the world.

Currently at Eastman he teaches jazz piano, directs the Jazz Performance Workshops, and heads the Eastman Jazz Trio, and Quartet. The group released their first CD in 2003 and continues to perform in the region. In addition to his own educational video, Jazz Keyboard Techniques, available only in Brazil, he can be seen and heard on video performances with Gerry Mulligan, Chet Baker, and Lee Konitz. Harold's featured column, "Solo Piano", appeared in Keyboard Magazine for more than five years, and his keyboard improvisation method, the Illustrated Keyboard Series, is a widely used reference work. In 2007 he received a Bridging Fellowship to do research in University of Rochester Linguistics Department on the relationship of speech and music, and continues to advise students who are pursuing this line of research. Harold has won ASCAP awards yearly since the early 80's for the value of his catalog of original compositions.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=70
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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Miguel Zenon "Tipico" http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928435 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928435 Eastman School, Kilbourn Hall 1498514400 1498518000  

Multiple Grammy Nominee and Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellow Miguel Zenón represents a select group of musicians who have masterfully balanced and blended the often-contradictory poles of innovation and tradition. Widely considered as one of the most groundbreaking and influential saxophonists of his generation, he has also developed a unique voice as a composer and as a conceptualist, concentrating his efforts on perfecting a fine mix between Latin American Folkloric Music and Jazz.

His latest release, Típico (Miel Music, 2017) celebrates the Miguel Zenón Quartet, his working band of more than 15 years, which includes Venezuelan pianist Luis Perdomo, Austrian bassist Hans Glawischnig and fellow Puerto Rican drummer Henry Cole. The album features original music by Zenón, which was specifically written for the members of the Quartet and directly inspired by their individual playing and personalities. The end result is a testament to the band's unique chemistry and their outstanding collective musicianship.

Born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Zenón studied classical saxophone at the Escuela Libre de Música in Puerto Rico before receiving a bachelor's degree in Jazz Studies from Berklee College of Music, and a master's degree in Jazz Performance at Manhattan School of Music. Zenón's more formal studies, however, are supplemented and enhanced by his vast and diverse experience as a sideman and collaborator. Throughout his career he has divided his time equally between working with older jazz masters and working with the music's younger innovators –irrespective of styles and genres. The list of musicians Zenón has toured and/or recorded with includes: Charlie Haden, Fred Hersch, Kenny Werner, David Sánchez, Danilo Perez, The Village Vanguard Orchestra, Guillermo Klein & Los Guachos, The Jeff Ballard Trio, Antonio Sanchez, David Gilmore, Paoli Mejias, Brian Lynch, Jason Lindner, Miles Okazaki, Ray Barreto, Andy Montañez, Jerry Gonzalez & The Fort Apache Band, The Mingus Big Band, Bobby Hutcherson and Steve Coleman.

He is also a founding member of the groundbreaking SFJAZZ Collective, a group whose past and current members include Bobby Hutcherson, Joe Lovano, Joshua Redman, Brian Blade, Nicholas Payton, Dave Douglas, and Eric Harland. In 2012, Zenón's association with SFJAZZ expanded even further, when he served as resident artistic director for the first two seasons of the SFJAZZ Center, along with Bill Frisell, Jason Moran, Regina Carter and John Santos.

Zenón's ten recordings as a leader (including the above mentioned Típico) represent not only his growth as a musician, but also his ability to constantly evolve and reinvent himself as a conceptualist and producer.

His debut CD, Looking Forward (Fresh Sound New Talent, 2002), represents a snapshot of the very eclectic musical interests of the then 24-year-old musician, and was selected by the New York Times as the number one "alternative" jazz recording of 2002.

His second recording as a leader, Ceremonial (Marsalis Music, 2004), was described by All About Jazz as a " head on crash of Latin, Jazz and Classical traditions–modern Jazz at it's very best, " and garnered unanimous critical praise and recognition both within and outside the jazz world.

Jíbaro (Marsalis Music, 2005), his third recording, was further proof that all the critical praise he had been receiving was well deserved. The recording is an exploration of a style of popular Puerto Rican folk music known as La Música Jíbara. The Chicago Tribune summed it up best when they wrote: "The instrumental prowess of Zenon's playing, the vigor of his compositions and the sensitivity of his band to Puerto Rican song forms point to new possibilities in jazz." Like his previous recordings, Jíbaro was uniformly well received and appeared on many top ten lists including The New York Times, Latin Beat, El Nuevo Día, and the Chicago Tribune.

Decidedly more personal and introspective, Awake (Marsalis Music, 2008) incorporates a string quartet and additional horns to Zenón's core group and brings to the forefront his formidable skills as a writer and arranger. As was admirably put in Audiophile Audition: " This is an album far beyond the usual sax & string outing, revealing a unique statement that communicates passion, intellect and spirit to the listener." Awake also caught the attention of the international press, garnering it 5 star reviews and top honors in publications like Jazzwise (UK), Jazz Man (France) and Jazz Magazine (France).

Zenón returned to his Puerto Rican roots for inspiration in his next outing, Esta Plena (Marsalis Music, 2009), which draws from the traditional Plena music style of his home country and was supported by a fellowship from the prestigious John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. On it Zenón augmented his quartet to include three percussionists/vocalists and took on the additional roles of both lyricist and vocalist. Jazz Times wrote that Esta Plena is "…music with integrity, energy, poise and a fresh vision of how the Afro-Caribbean jazz aesthetic can evolve without losing its deep roots." In addition to being hailed by critics (New York Times, Village Voice, El Nuevo Día , Downbeat, The Chicago Tribune ) as one of the best recordings of 2009, the recording earned Zenón two Grammy nominations (one for Best Improvised solo and one for Best Latin Jazz Recording of the year) as well as a Latin Grammy nomination for Best Latin Jazz Recording of the year.

Alma Adentro (Marsalis Music, 2011), is a tribute to The Puerto Rican Songbook. On it he arranges and explores the music of five legendary Puerto Rican composers: Bobby Capó, Tite Curet Alonso, Pedro Flores, Rafael Hernández, and Sylvia Rexach (whom he considers "the George Gershwins, Cole Porters and Jerome Kerns of Puerto Rican song"). The recording features his longtime working quartet of pianist Luis Perdomo, bassist Hans Glawischnig and drummer Henry Cole, plus a ten-piece woodwind ensemble orchestrated and conducted by close friend and collaborator Guillermo Klein. This groundbreaking project both honors the music of these masters while at the same time exposing their music to new audiences. Alma Adentro was chosen as the Best Jazz Recording of 2011 by iTunes and NPR, and was Nominated for a 2012 Grammy Award for Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album and a 2012 Latin Grammy for Best Instrumental Album.

Rayuela (Sunnyside Records 2012), is a collaboration with french pianist/composer Laurent Coq. It was inspired by the literary masterpiece of the same name by argentinean writer Julio Cortázar (Hopscotch in english) and the compositions on the recording look to translate some of the most memorable characters and passages from the book into musical terms. They are joined by Dana Leong (cello and trombone) and Dan Weiss (tabla, drums and percussion), masterful musicians who help create the unique ensemble sound that distinguishes this very special project.

Oye!!! Live in Puerto Rico (Miel Music, 2013) features the debut recording of The Rhythm Collective, an ensemble first put together in 2003 for a month long tour of West Africa. The group includes Aldemar Valentín on Electric Bass, Tony Escapa on Drums and Reinaldo de Jesus on percussion; all native Puerto Ricans and some of the most coveted musicians in their respective fields. Fed by the energy of the full capacity audience in attendance, the group delivers a high intensity performance which includes originals by Zenon and covers of Tito Puente's "Oye Como Va" and Silvio Rodriguez' "El Necio".

Identities are Changeable (Miel Music, 2014) is inspired by the idea of national identity as experienced by the Puerto Rican community in the United States, specifically in the New York area. All the music on the album is written around a series of interviews with several individuals, all of them New Yorkers of Puerto Rican descent. The narrative created by these conversations gave birth to all the compositions on the record, with audio excerpts from the interviews weaving in and out each piece. The album, which is also complemented by a video installment by David Dempewolf, features Zenón's longstanding quartet (with Luis Perdomo, Hans Glawischnig and Henry Cole) plus a twelve-piece large ensemble comprised of some of the best musicians in jazz today. Identities Are Changeable was Nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Album and chosen as one of the best recordings of 2014 by NBC News, NPR, The Boston Globe, Rhapsody, All About Jazz and Jazz News Magazine, among others.

As a composer he has been commissioned by SFJAZZ, The New York State Council for the Arts, Chamber Music America, Logan Center for The Arts, The Hyde Park Jazz Festival, The John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Jazz Reach, Peak Performances, PRISM Quartet and many of his peers.

He has been featured in articles on publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, Bloomberg Pursuits, Jazz Times, Jazziz, Boston Globe, Billboard, Jazz Inside, Newsday, Details, as well as gracing the cover of Downbeat Magazine on two occasions (2010 & 2014). He has also topped the Rising Star Alto Sax category of the Downbeat Critic's Poll on four different occasions, topped both the Jazz Artist of the Year and Alto Saxophonist of the Year categories on the 2014 Jazz Times Critics Poll and was selected as the 2015 Alto Saxophonist of the Year by the Jazz Journalist Association.

Zenon's biography would not be complete without discussing his role as an educator. In 2003, he was chosen by the Kennedy Center to teach and perform in West Africa as part of their Jazz Ambassador program. Since then, he has given hundreds of lectures and master classes and has taught all over the world at institutions which include: The Banff Centre, Berklee College of Music, Siena Jazz, Universidad Veracruzana, Conservatorium Van Amsterdam, Musik Akademie Basel, Conservatoire de Paris, University of Manitoba, Manhattan School of Music, Columbia University, Princeton University, UMass-Amherst and the Brubeck Institute. He is also a permanent faculty member at New England Conservatory of Music. But perhaps what best reflects his commitment to education and cements his growing reputation as a "cultural ambassador", is a program that he founded in 2011, called Caravana Cultural.

The main purpose of Caravana Cultural is to present free-of-charge Jazz concerts in rural areas of Puerto Rico. The program makes a "cultural investment" in the Island by giving these communities a chance to listen to jazz of the highest caliber (Zenón invites some of the best musicians in the New York jazz scene to perform as guests), while at the same time getting young Puerto Rican musicians actively involved in the concert activities. Since February 2011, Zenón has presented a concert every four to six months. Each concert focuses on the music of a specific jazz legend (Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, among others) and is preceded by a pre-concert presentation which touches on the basic elements of jazz and improvisation. Since 2005 Zenón has also personally organized "Jazz Jam Sessions" in the area of San Juan, as a way of creating a platform for younger jazz musicians to grow and interact with one another.

In 2008 he was selected as one of 25 distinguished individuals to receive the prestigious and coveted MacArthur Fellowship, more commonly known as the "Genius Grant".

Zenón lives in New York City with his wife Elga and their daughter.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=192
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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Marquis Hill Blacktet http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928436 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928436 Eastman School Miller Center Sproull Atrium 1498515300 1498518900  
Marquis Hill Blacktet

Chicago has long been a major jazz cradle. Ever since pioneers such as Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, and King Oliver planted seeds of the music in 1917, the Windy City has birthed numerous jazz titans of various stylistic idioms, ranging from such swing stalwarts as Benny Goodman and Bud Freedman to such modernists as Muhal Richard Abrams, Jack DeJohnette and Herbie Hancock. You can now add 29-year-old Marquis Hill to the list. The New York Times described him as a "dauntingly skilled trumpeter," and the Chicago Tribune asserts that "his music crystallizes the hard-hitting, hard-swinging spirit of Chicago jazz."

Hill hones a warm, mellifluous tone on trumpet and flugelhorn with which he unravels sleek melodic passages that are as commanding as they are cogent. As a composer, he builds upon his distinctive sound to craft arresting originals that embrace post-bop, hip-hop, R&B and spoken word. After releasing four well-received discs on Skiptone Music – New Gospel (2011), Sound of the City (2012), The Poet (2013) and Modern Flows, vol. 1 (2014) – Hill raised his profile significantly by winning the 2014 Thelonious Trumpet Competition, which awarded him a $25,000 scholarship and a recording contract with Concord Records.

His enthralling Concord Records debut, The Way We Play will have featured Hill fronting his commanding ensemble, the Blacktet (altoist Christopher McBride, vibraphonist Justin Thomas, bassist Joshua Ramos, drummer Makaya McCraven and special guests Christie Dashiell, Vincent Gardner, Juan Pastor, and Harold Green III, respectively on voice, trombone, percussion, and spoken word). The Way We Play has captured Hill's uber-tasteful redress of standards, many learnt in formative years. Classics like Hancock's "Maiden Voyage" and Monk's "Straight No Chaser" have been joined by less known things like Carmell Jones' "Beep Durple" and Donald Byrd's "Fly Little Bird Fly." Always reverencing essence, Hill yet brought his lyrically postmodern groove to the material.

Music captured and cultivated Hill's powerful imagination from very early on. While growing up in the Chatham neighborhood on Chicago's South Side, he began playing drums in the forth grade but was soon wooed toward trumpet by his older cousin's practicing of the instrument. His introduction to jazz, fifth grade, was via attendance at Dixon Elementary. The school's band director Diane Ellis gave him a Lee Morgan album, quickly igniting and lighting a strategic young pilgrimage. "I praise her a lot," says Hill. "I listened to that Lee Morgan record and had my mind blown. Since that moment I've just been in love with this music."

The next year, Hill met another musical educator who would have a profound influence – Ronald Carter. In addition to being the jazz director for Northern Illinois University, Carter also ran the South Shore Youth Program, a youth organization that took inner-city kids and paid them every two weeks to rehearse in a big band for five days a week and hold weekly concerts. Carter made such an indelible impression that he inspired Hill to attend Northern Illinois University (NIU) after attending Kenwood Academy High School. Hill graduated from the NIU in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts in Music Education.

Hill also participated in the Ravinia Jazz Scholars, which afforded him the opportunity to learn under such established jazz artists as guitarist Bobby Broom, pianist Willie Pickens, and trumpeter Tito Carrillo. While still an undergraduate, Hill became one of Chicago's most in-demand jazz trumpeters; he made noteworthy club dates with a host of the Chi-Town's finest including saxophonists Von Freeman and Fred Anderson.

Hill's formal musical education continued at DePaul University's School of Music, where he earned a graduate degree in jazz pedagogy. Even as a recording artist, leading his Blacktet and appearing on recordings by such Chicago-based artists as singer Milton Suggs, saxophonist Ernest Dawkins, and bassist Matt Ulery, Hill maintained his involvement in music education by teaching at the University of Illinois in Chicago, Harold Washington College, the Birch Creek Music Performance Center in Egg Harbor, Wis., and the NIU Summer Jazz Camp.

In 2014, Hill moved to New York while still making numerous appearances in Chicago. Focusing on his solo career is paramount, but he's still making waves as a sideman for internationally acclaimed artists such as bassist Marcus Miller and saxophonist Joe Lovano. Two years after winning the Monk Competition, Hill says that he's still on cloud nine. "Winning that competition taught me to trust myself and keep working hard for what I believe in," he says. "That experience taught me that I'm here for a purpose. So I need to keep pushing my music forward."

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=201
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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Harold Danko http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928438 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928438 Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall 1498520700 1498524300

 

Harold Danko is well recognized from long-term associations with impressive jazz legends including Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan, Thad Jones/Mel Lewis, Lee Konitz and Woody Herman, in performances at major jazz venues throughout the world as well as on recordings, television and video. During the last two decades he has become increasingly known as a band leader, composer, and solo pianist, and is well documented in those capacities on more than thirty CDs on the SteepleChase and SunnySide labels.

As a leader he has been featured at the Rochester International Jazz Festival, Lincoln Center's "Meet the Artist" series, Washington DC Performing Arts Society series at J.F.K. Center, and numerous jazz festivals both in the USA and abroad. Throughout the 1990's he performed with and composed for his quartet with Rich Perry (tenor saxophone), Scott Colley (bass) and Jeff Hirshfield (drums), and in 1995 received an NEA Fellowship to perform his own works in a series of concerts in New York City. More recently he has led a trio with Hirshfield and Michael Formanek or Jay Anderson (bass) in addition to adapting many of his compositions for solo piano performance. He recently returned from a professional leave of absence in the fall of 2011, during which he taught and performed in Taiwan, Italy, and Switzerland, in addition to work on two new recording projects. His latest trio CD, released in 2012, is "Unriched" on SteepleChase.

Professor Danko has been on the faculty of the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, since 1998 and served as Jazz Studies Chair from 2002 – 2011. Prior to his appointment at Eastman he served on the faculties of the Manhattan School of Music, the New School/Mannes, Hartt College, and other institutions. Beginning his piano studies at the age of five, Harold became serious about pursuing a career in jazz at the age of fifteen when he commenced studies with Gene Rush in Youngstown, Ohio. After graduation from Youngstown State University and a stint in the U.S. Army band, Harold landed the piano chair in Woody Herman's Thundering Herd, which launched his career as a much sought after jazz musician. He also developed a reputation as a respected jazz educator in New York City and throughout the world.

Currently at Eastman he teaches jazz piano, directs the Jazz Performance Workshops, and heads the Eastman Jazz Trio, and Quartet. The group released their first CD in 2003 and continues to perform in the region. In addition to his own educational video, Jazz Keyboard Techniques, available only in Brazil, he can be seen and heard on video performances with Gerry Mulligan, Chet Baker, and Lee Konitz. Harold's featured column, "Solo Piano", appeared in Keyboard Magazine for more than five years, and his keyboard improvisation method, the Illustrated Keyboard Series, is a widely used reference work. In 2007 he received a Bridging Fellowship to do research in University of Rochester Linguistics Department on the relationship of speech and music, and continues to advise students who are pursuing this line of research. Harold has won ASCAP awards yearly since the early 80's for the value of his catalog of original compositions.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=70

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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Miguel Zenon "Tipico" http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928434 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928434 Eastman School, Kilbourn Hall 1498525200 1498528800

 

Multiple Grammy Nominee and Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellow Miguel Zenón represents a select group of musicians who have masterfully balanced and blended the often-contradictory poles of innovation and tradition. Widely considered as one of the most groundbreaking and influential saxophonists of his generation, he has also developed a unique voice as a composer and as a conceptualist, concentrating his efforts on perfecting a fine mix between Latin American Folkloric Music and Jazz.

His latest release, Típico (Miel Music, 2017) celebrates the Miguel Zenón Quartet, his working band of more than 15 years, which includes Venezuelan pianist Luis Perdomo, Austrian bassist Hans Glawischnig and fellow Puerto Rican drummer Henry Cole. The album features original music by Zenón, which was specifically written for the members of the Quartet and directly inspired by their individual playing and personalities. The end result is a testament to the band's unique chemistry and their outstanding collective musicianship.

Born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Zenón studied classical saxophone at the Escuela Libre de Música in Puerto Rico before receiving a bachelor's degree in Jazz Studies from Berklee College of Music, and a master's degree in Jazz Performance at Manhattan School of Music. Zenón's more formal studies, however, are supplemented and enhanced by his vast and diverse experience as a sideman and collaborator. Throughout his career he has divided his time equally between working with older jazz masters and working with the music's younger innovators –irrespective of styles and genres. The list of musicians Zenón has toured and/or recorded with includes: Charlie Haden, Fred Hersch, Kenny Werner, David Sánchez, Danilo Perez, The Village Vanguard Orchestra, Guillermo Klein & Los Guachos, The Jeff Ballard Trio, Antonio Sanchez, David Gilmore, Paoli Mejias, Brian Lynch, Jason Lindner, Miles Okazaki, Ray Barreto, Andy Montañez, Jerry Gonzalez & The Fort Apache Band, The Mingus Big Band, Bobby Hutcherson and Steve Coleman.

He is also a founding member of the groundbreaking SFJAZZ Collective, a group whose past and current members include Bobby Hutcherson, Joe Lovano, Joshua Redman, Brian Blade, Nicholas Payton, Dave Douglas, and Eric Harland. In 2012, Zenón's association with SFJAZZ expanded even further, when he served as resident artistic director for the first two seasons of the SFJAZZ Center, along with Bill Frisell, Jason Moran, Regina Carter and John Santos.

Zenón's ten recordings as a leader (including the above mentioned Típico) represent not only his growth as a musician, but also his ability to constantly evolve and reinvent himself as a conceptualist and producer.

His debut CD, Looking Forward (Fresh Sound New Talent, 2002), represents a snapshot of the very eclectic musical interests of the then 24-year-old musician, and was selected by the New York Times as the number one "alternative" jazz recording of 2002.

His second recording as a leader, Ceremonial (Marsalis Music, 2004), was described by All About Jazz as a " head on crash of Latin, Jazz and Classical traditions–modern Jazz at it's very best, " and garnered unanimous critical praise and recognition both within and outside the jazz world.

Jíbaro (Marsalis Music, 2005), his third recording, was further proof that all the critical praise he had been receiving was well deserved. The recording is an exploration of a style of popular Puerto Rican folk music known as La Música Jíbara. The Chicago Tribune summed it up best when they wrote: "The instrumental prowess of Zenon's playing, the vigor of his compositions and the sensitivity of his band to Puerto Rican song forms point to new possibilities in jazz." Like his previous recordings, Jíbaro was uniformly well received and appeared on many top ten lists including The New York Times, Latin Beat, El Nuevo Día, and the Chicago Tribune.

Decidedly more personal and introspective, Awake (Marsalis Music, 2008) incorporates a string quartet and additional horns to Zenón's core group and brings to the forefront his formidable skills as a writer and arranger. As was admirably put in Audiophile Audition: " This is an album far beyond the usual sax & string outing, revealing a unique statement that communicates passion, intellect and spirit to the listener." Awake also caught the attention of the international press, garnering it 5 star reviews and top honors in publications like Jazzwise (UK), Jazz Man (France) and Jazz Magazine (France).

Zenón returned to his Puerto Rican roots for inspiration in his next outing, Esta Plena (Marsalis Music, 2009), which draws from the traditional Plena music style of his home country and was supported by a fellowship from the prestigious John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. On it Zenón augmented his quartet to include three percussionists/vocalists and took on the additional roles of both lyricist and vocalist. Jazz Times wrote that Esta Plena is "…music with integrity, energy, poise and a fresh vision of how the Afro-Caribbean jazz aesthetic can evolve without losing its deep roots." In addition to being hailed by critics (New York Times, Village Voice, El Nuevo Día , Downbeat, The Chicago Tribune ) as one of the best recordings of 2009, the recording earned Zenón two Grammy nominations (one for Best Improvised solo and one for Best Latin Jazz Recording of the year) as well as a Latin Grammy nomination for Best Latin Jazz Recording of the year.

Alma Adentro (Marsalis Music, 2011), is a tribute to The Puerto Rican Songbook. On it he arranges and explores the music of five legendary Puerto Rican composers: Bobby Capó, Tite Curet Alonso, Pedro Flores, Rafael Hernández, and Sylvia Rexach (whom he considers "the George Gershwins, Cole Porters and Jerome Kerns of Puerto Rican song"). The recording features his longtime working quartet of pianist Luis Perdomo, bassist Hans Glawischnig and drummer Henry Cole, plus a ten-piece woodwind ensemble orchestrated and conducted by close friend and collaborator Guillermo Klein. This groundbreaking project both honors the music of these masters while at the same time exposing their music to new audiences. Alma Adentro was chosen as the Best Jazz Recording of 2011 by iTunes and NPR, and was Nominated for a 2012 Grammy Award for Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album and a 2012 Latin Grammy for Best Instrumental Album.

Rayuela (Sunnyside Records 2012), is a collaboration with french pianist/composer Laurent Coq. It was inspired by the literary masterpiece of the same name by argentinean writer Julio Cortázar (Hopscotch in english) and the compositions on the recording look to translate some of the most memorable characters and passages from the book into musical terms. They are joined by Dana Leong (cello and trombone) and Dan Weiss (tabla, drums and percussion), masterful musicians who help create the unique ensemble sound that distinguishes this very special project.

Oye!!! Live in Puerto Rico (Miel Music, 2013) features the debut recording of The Rhythm Collective, an ensemble first put together in 2003 for a month long tour of West Africa. The group includes Aldemar Valentín on Electric Bass, Tony Escapa on Drums and Reinaldo de Jesus on percussion; all native Puerto Ricans and some of the most coveted musicians in their respective fields. Fed by the energy of the full capacity audience in attendance, the group delivers a high intensity performance which includes originals by Zenon and covers of Tito Puente's "Oye Como Va" and Silvio Rodriguez' "El Necio".

Identities are Changeable (Miel Music, 2014) is inspired by the idea of national identity as experienced by the Puerto Rican community in the United States, specifically in the New York area. All the music on the album is written around a series of interviews with several individuals, all of them New Yorkers of Puerto Rican descent. The narrative created by these conversations gave birth to all the compositions on the record, with audio excerpts from the interviews weaving in and out each piece. The album, which is also complemented by a video installment by David Dempewolf, features Zenón's longstanding quartet (with Luis Perdomo, Hans Glawischnig and Henry Cole) plus a twelve-piece large ensemble comprised of some of the best musicians in jazz today. Identities Are Changeable was Nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Album and chosen as one of the best recordings of 2014 by NBC News, NPR, The Boston Globe, Rhapsody, All About Jazz and Jazz News Magazine, among others.

As a composer he has been commissioned by SFJAZZ, The New York State Council for the Arts, Chamber Music America, Logan Center for The Arts, The Hyde Park Jazz Festival, The John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Jazz Reach, Peak Performances, PRISM Quartet and many of his peers.

He has been featured in articles on publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, Bloomberg Pursuits, Jazz Times, Jazziz, Boston Globe, Billboard, Jazz Inside, Newsday, Details, as well as gracing the cover of Downbeat Magazine on two occasions (2010 & 2014). He has also topped the Rising Star Alto Sax category of the Downbeat Critic's Poll on four different occasions, topped both the Jazz Artist of the Year and Alto Saxophonist of the Year categories on the 2014 Jazz Times Critics Poll and was selected as the 2015 Alto Saxophonist of the Year by the Jazz Journalist Association.

Zenon's biography would not be complete without discussing his role as an educator. In 2003, he was chosen by the Kennedy Center to teach and perform in West Africa as part of their Jazz Ambassador program. Since then, he has given hundreds of lectures and master classes and has taught all over the world at institutions which include: The Banff Centre, Berklee College of Music, Siena Jazz, Universidad Veracruzana, Conservatorium Van Amsterdam, Musik Akademie Basel, Conservatoire de Paris, University of Manitoba, Manhattan School of Music, Columbia University, Princeton University, UMass-Amherst and the Brubeck Institute. He is also a permanent faculty member at New England Conservatory of Music. But perhaps what best reflects his commitment to education and cements his growing reputation as a "cultural ambassador", is a program that he founded in 2011, called Caravana Cultural.

The main purpose of Caravana Cultural is to present free-of-charge Jazz concerts in rural areas of Puerto Rico. The program makes a "cultural investment" in the Island by giving these communities a chance to listen to jazz of the highest caliber (Zenón invites some of the best musicians in the New York jazz scene to perform as guests), while at the same time getting young Puerto Rican musicians actively involved in the concert activities. Since February 2011, Zenón has presented a concert every four to six months. Each concert focuses on the music of a specific jazz legend (Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, among others) and is preceded by a pre-concert presentation which touches on the basic elements of jazz and improvisation. Since 2005 Zenón has also personally organized "Jazz Jam Sessions" in the area of San Juan, as a way of creating a platform for younger jazz musicians to grow and interact with one another.

In 2008 he was selected as one of 25 distinguished individuals to receive the prestigious and coveted MacArthur Fellowship, more commonly known as the "Genius Grant".

Zenón lives in New York City with his wife Elga and their daughter.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=192

]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Marquis Hill Blacktet http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928437 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928437 Eastman School Miller Center Sproull Atrium 1498528800 1498532400

 

Marquis Hill Blacktet

Chicago has long been a major jazz cradle. Ever since pioneers such as Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, and King Oliver planted seeds of the music in 1917, the Windy City has birthed numerous jazz titans of various stylistic idioms, ranging from such swing stalwarts as Benny Goodman and Bud Freedman to such modernists as Muhal Richard Abrams, Jack DeJohnette and Herbie Hancock. You can now add 29-year-old Marquis Hill to the list. The New York Times described him as a "dauntingly skilled trumpeter," and the Chicago Tribune asserts that "his music crystallizes the hard-hitting, hard-swinging spirit of Chicago jazz."

Hill hones a warm, mellifluous tone on trumpet and flugelhorn with which he unravels sleek melodic passages that are as commanding as they are cogent. As a composer, he builds upon his distinctive sound to craft arresting originals that embrace post-bop, hip-hop, R&B and spoken word. After releasing four well-received discs on Skiptone Music – New Gospel (2011), Sound of the City (2012), The Poet (2013) and Modern Flows, vol. 1 (2014) – Hill raised his profile significantly by winning the 2014 Thelonious Trumpet Competition, which awarded him a $25,000 scholarship and a recording contract with Concord Records.

His enthralling Concord Records debut, The Way We Play will have featured Hill fronting his commanding ensemble, the Blacktet (altoist Christopher McBride, vibraphonist Justin Thomas, bassist Joshua Ramos, drummer Makaya McCraven and special guests Christie Dashiell, Vincent Gardner, Juan Pastor, and Harold Green III, respectively on voice, trombone, percussion, and spoken word). The Way We Play has captured Hill's uber-tasteful redress of standards, many learnt in formative years. Classics like Hancock's "Maiden Voyage" and Monk's "Straight No Chaser" have been joined by less known things like Carmell Jones' "Beep Durple" and Donald Byrd's "Fly Little Bird Fly." Always reverencing essence, Hill yet brought his lyrically postmodern groove to the material.

Music captured and cultivated Hill's powerful imagination from very early on. While growing up in the Chatham neighborhood on Chicago's South Side, he began playing drums in the forth grade but was soon wooed toward trumpet by his older cousin's practicing of the instrument. His introduction to jazz, fifth grade, was via attendance at Dixon Elementary. The school's band director Diane Ellis gave him a Lee Morgan album, quickly igniting and lighting a strategic young pilgrimage. "I praise her a lot," says Hill. "I listened to that Lee Morgan record and had my mind blown. Since that moment I've just been in love with this music."

The next year, Hill met another musical educator who would have a profound influence – Ronald Carter. In addition to being the jazz director for Northern Illinois University, Carter also ran the South Shore Youth Program, a youth organization that took inner-city kids and paid them every two weeks to rehearse in a big band for five days a week and hold weekly concerts. Carter made such an indelible impression that he inspired Hill to attend Northern Illinois University (NIU) after attending Kenwood Academy High School. Hill graduated from the NIU in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts in Music Education.

Hill also participated in the Ravinia Jazz Scholars, which afforded him the opportunity to learn under such established jazz artists as guitarist Bobby Broom, pianist Willie Pickens, and trumpeter Tito Carrillo. While still an undergraduate, Hill became one of Chicago's most in-demand jazz trumpeters; he made noteworthy club dates with a host of the Chi-Town's finest including saxophonists Von Freeman and Fred Anderson.

Hill's formal musical education continued at DePaul University's School of Music, where he earned a graduate degree in jazz pedagogy. Even as a recording artist, leading his Blacktet and appearing on recordings by such Chicago-based artists as singer Milton Suggs, saxophonist Ernest Dawkins, and bassist Matt Ulery, Hill maintained his involvement in music education by teaching at the University of Illinois in Chicago, Harold Washington College, the Birch Creek Music Performance Center in Egg Harbor, Wis., and the NIU Summer Jazz Camp.

In 2014, Hill moved to New York while still making numerous appearances in Chicago. Focusing on his solo career is paramount, but he's still making waves as a sideman for internationally acclaimed artists such as bassist Marcus Miller and saxophonist Joe Lovano. Two years after winning the Monk Competition, Hill says that he's still on cloud nine. "Winning that competition taught me to trust myself and keep working hard for what I believe in," he says. "That experience taught me that I'm here for a purpose. So I need to keep pushing my music forward."

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=201

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Tuesday Pipes. 25-minute organ concert by Amanda Mole, Eastman School of Music http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133873 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133873 Eastman School - Off Campus Christ Church 1498579800 1498582800 Rochester International Jazz Festival: Tommy Smith Jazz Workshop http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133776 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133776 Eastman School Ray Wright Room 1498582800 1498588200
 
 
 XRIJF Jazz Workshops for Young Music Students

FREE

~Sponsored by Wegmans~

No registration is required.

Attend one or more days.

Open to all grade school and high school music students.

This series of five structured jazz workshops gives young music students the exceptional opportunity to play and meet, listen to and learn from professional jazz musicians performing at the festival. It is hosted by Bob Sneider, Eastman School of Music Assistant Professor of Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media and Senior Instructor of Jazz Guitar, and led by five musicians performing at XRIJF.

ABOUT TOMMY SMITH, SAX

Tommy Smith (b.1967) is a leading light in European jazz, first and foremost as one of the finest saxophonists of his generation, and latterly as the founder and current director of The Scottish National Jazz Orchestra (SNJO). These career-defining achievements are framed by his status as an international recording artist; a composer and arranger of extraordinary ambition; and not least, as a jazz educator.

His prolific career began in earnest when, aged only sixteen, he recorded his first album Giant Strides. He was rewarded with a scholarship to Berklee College of Music, an experience that has shaped his affirmative approach to jazz. Since then, he has made twenty-six solo albums as a leader for Blue Note, Linn and his own label Spartacus Records.

Smith has also earned the regard, support and friendship of the many respected jazz figures with whom he has collaborated and created great jazz. They include, but are not limited to, Gary Burton, Chick Corea, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny, Barron, Arild Andersen, John Scofield and Trilok Gurtu. His tenure with the SNJO has seen critically acclaimed performances and recordings of programmed and commissioned works including hugely popular treatments of Ellington, Gershwin, Weather Report and Miles Davis.

Tommy Smith is also founder/director of The Tommy Smith Youth Jazz Orchestra and is current Artistic Director of the first ever full-time jazz course at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. He also holds three honorary doctorates from Heriot-Watt, Glasgow Caledonian & Edinburgh Universities and a Professorship from the RCS. His latest album KARMA won him his seventh Scottish Jazz Award for album of the year in 2012.

Tommy Smith is a D'Addario Performing Artist and performs exclusively on Select Jazz reeds.

 For more information, please visit:

http://www.rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=329

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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Eri Yamamoto http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928440 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928440 Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall 1498599900 1498603500

 

 Since moving to the United States in 1995, Eri Yamamoto has established herself as one of jazz's most

original and compelling pianists and composers. Jazz legend Herbie Hancock has said, "My hat's off to her... already she's found her own voice."

Eri's tenth leader album, life, that is a generous new collection of unique songs, performed with her longstanding trio partners, bassist David Ambrosio and drummer Ikuo Takeuchi. As the album title suggest, the music portrays a wide range of her experiences- from joyful to introspective, reflecting the vibrancy of New York City and exploring mysteries of nature and memory. The Eri Yamamoto Trio has developed a unique sound and repertoire, and has built a loyal following in New York and abroad. They have toured the U. S., Canada, Australia, Europe, and Japan, with appearances at major festivals.

Eri has also developed a personal voice as a solo pianist, and has moved audiences with her renditions of her own compositions and her spontaneous improvisations.

Eri was born in Osaka, Japan, and began playing classical piano at age three. She started composing when only eight years old, and studied voice, viola, and composition through her high school and college years. In 1995, she visited New York for the first time, and by chance heard Tommy Flanagan performing. She was so

inspired by her first experience of a jazz piano trio that she decided on the spot to move to New York and dedicate herself to learning jazz. Later that year, Eri entered the New School University's prestigious jazz program, where she studied with Reggie Workman, Junior Mance, and LeeAnn Ledgerwood. In 1999, while still in school, she started playing regularly at the Avenue B Social Club, a popular spot among jazz musicians in the East Village. There she developed a musical friendship with fellow pianist Matthew Shipp.

Since 2000, Eri's trio has been appearing regularly at Arthur's Tavern, a historic jazz club in New York's Greenwich Village.

Eri has also been collaborating with such creative and celebrated musicians as William Parker, Daniel Carter, Hamid Drake, Federico Ughi, Yves Leveille and Paul McCandless. Eri has appeared on five William Parker recordings, and has performed in the U.S., Canada, Italy, Holland, Norway, Tunisia, Portugal an South Africa with his trio and sextet.

Finally, Eri is a gifted educator. She received her master of music in education and composition from Shiga University, Japan. She has taught private lessons and workshops to jazz musicians of all instruments from the U. S., Japan, Europe, and North Africa.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://www.rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=243

]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Steve Kuhn Trio http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928446 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928446 Eastman School, Kilbourn Hall 1498600800 1498604400  

 

Over a career of a half-century and counting, Steve Kuhn has earned renown as one of the most lyrical and affecting pianists in jazz, with an unfailingly beautiful touch and a sophisticated sense of swing. "Steve is an original stylist," points out Dan Morgenstern, director of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers. "He's one of the finest pianists out there today." Jazziz magazine described Kuhn's distinctive sound: "Few other pianists, regardless of genre, can tease such an evocative range of timbres from their instrument. Kuhn's lower register is as dark and rich as Belgian chocolate, and his upper register has the light, translucent quality of ice-cold champagne."

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=193
]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Vanessa Rubin http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928444 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928444 Eastman School Miller Center Sproull Atrium 1498601700 1498605300  
Vanessa Rubin

Endowed with the kind of liquid phrasing and sheer wisdom that comes from depth of experience on the jazz performance campaign trail, Vanessa Rubin is an ever-evolving classic singer in the making. The development of a true jazz singer is a long-range prospect, laden with learning experiences that forge the voice into a true instrument, rich with passion, deeply invested in living through life's joys and perils; such is the journey of Vanessa Rubin, jazz singer extraordinaire. Capable of employing the gamut of emotions, the mature Ms. Rubin can range from whisper to shout in the blink of an eye; from honey-laden ballads purring like a kitten, to up tempo swinging and scatting like a fluent saxophone, she delivers the goods.

One of the surest tests of a jazz singer is her acceptance by skilled players; the relationship between instrumentalist and vocalist is so often fraught with distrust. Vanessa Rubin has never experienced such travails. From the time she joined the New York jazz community in the early 80s, under the guidance of such grandmasters as Barry Harris and Frank Foster, Rubin's acceptance has been universal. Instrumentalists have always been impressed by her way around a song, her willingness to flow with their muse, and her innate ability to swing that music.

The list of great musicians who have graced her recordings and bandstands is quite impressive: Monty Alexander, Cecil Bridgewater, Kenny Burrell, Frank Foster, Billy Higgins, Etta Jones, Lewis Nash, Houston Person, Patience Higgins, Don Braden, Toots Thielemans, Steve Turre, Cedar Walton, Grover Washington, Jr., and James Williams are just a few of the masters who've lent their skills to support Ms. Rubin's artistry. More recently she has completed auspicious global tours with Herbie Hancock, the Woody Herman Orchestra, and the Jazz Crusaders.

The range of material within Vanessa Rubin's broad comfort zone is impressive. It takes conviction and expertise to address the work of composers ranging from Ellington, Gershwin, and Weil to Dizzy Gillespie, Carmen McRae, Wayne Shorter and Sting. But all's well when Vanessa Rubin immerses her pearly tones in such a capacious range of material, not to mention her own considerable pallet of originals.

Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio to parents from Trinidad and Louisiana, Vanessa arrived steeped in great musical traditions. After achieving her Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism from Ohio State University, Rubin taught school for a number of years, all the while with both feet squarely in the jazz lexicon on a path towards a career in music. Along the way she played the regional joints and concerts, dabbled in band management, and continued to hone her skills.

By 1982 the jazz cauldron of New York City beckoned and she wisely knew it was that time. Landing at the Jazz Cultural Theater and the tutelage of Barry Harris and Frank Foster proved a wise move as it led not only to veteran acceptance, but to numerous renowned bandstands. Among those early gigs were stints with the likes of Kenny Barron, Pharoah Sanders, Lionel Hampton, and the Mercer Ellington Orchestra. These and subsequent affiliations are clear evidence that Rubin is not only singer, but a true musician. Ever the pragmatist, she kept a day job in the New York City school system for a minute, but it was clear that the bandstand would be her ultimate arena.

Clearly Vanessa Rubin's musical skills do not end on the bandstand. She's not only vocalist, lyricist, and composer, she's producer, arranger, savvy in artist & repertoire matters, educator (cited for Outstanding Service to Jazz Education by the International Association of Jazz Educators), music business consultant/facilitator, and music student adjudicator engaged by such auspicious institutions as the Thelonious Monk Institute, Jazz at Lincoln Center and the Kennedy Center. Labeled one of the "Diva Nouvelles" by Essence Magazine, Vanessa Rubin continues on a sure and true sojourn towards mastering her craft.

As a 2011 Kevin Klein Award Nominee for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Musical, Vanessa continues to demonstrate her chameleon like ability extending her gift of storytelling in the one woman theatrical portrayal of the great Billie Holiday in "Yesterdays, An Evening with Billie Holiday", while also interpreting many of Holiday's most remembered songs.

Although she began her professional singing career in Cleveland, where she sang with and managed a popular jazz quartet, Vanessa made the risky but wise move to New York in 1982. While word of her incredible voice spread throughout the jazz community, she studied with Barry Harris and Frank Foster at Harris' Jazz Cultural Theater. Early New York engagements were with nationally renowned artists such as Kenny Barron, Stanley Cowell, George Coleman, Pharoah Sanders, Paul West, Frank Foster's Loud Minority, the Lionel Hampton Big Band and the Mercer Ellington Orchestra. Still, the ever independent, practical vocalist hedged her bets. Having earned a BA from The Ohio State University School of Journalism, she supplemented her singing career by teaching, and serving as a Dean of Students in New York City's public school system. "Teaching," she said, "proved to be valuable in two ways. It provided a means for me to stay in New York; to be in the kind of environment I felt I needed to develop as a vocalist. And it uncovered a real passion I didn't know I had for helping troubled teenagers. My ultimate calling, however, was to sing."

 

For more information please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=202
]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Eri Yamamoto http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928441 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928441 Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall 1498607100 1498610700  

 Since moving to the United States in 1995, Eri Yamamoto has established herself as one of jazz's most

original and compelling pianists and composers. Jazz legend Herbie Hancock has said, "My hat's off to her... already she's found her own voice."

Eri's tenth leader album, life, that is a generous new collection of unique songs, performed with her longstanding trio partners, bassist David Ambrosio and drummer Ikuo Takeuchi. As the album title suggest, the music portrays a wide range of her experiences- from joyful to introspective, reflecting the vibrancy of New York City and exploring mysteries of nature and memory. The Eri Yamamoto Trio has developed a unique sound and repertoire, and has built a loyal following in New York and abroad. They have toured the U. S., Canada, Australia, Europe, and Japan, with appearances at major festivals.

Eri has also developed a personal voice as a solo pianist, and has moved audiences with her renditions of her own compositions and her spontaneous improvisations.

Eri was born in Osaka, Japan, and began playing classical piano at age three. She started composing when only eight years old, and studied voice, viola, and composition through her high school and college years. In 1995, she visited New York for the first time, and by chance heard Tommy Flanagan performing. She was so

inspired by her first experience of a jazz piano trio that she decided on the spot to move to New York and dedicate herself to learning jazz. Later that year, Eri entered the New School University's prestigious jazz program, where she studied with Reggie Workman, Junior Mance, and LeeAnn Ledgerwood. In 1999, while still in school, she started playing regularly at the Avenue B Social Club, a popular spot among jazz musicians in the East Village. There she developed a musical friendship with fellow pianist Matthew Shipp.

Since 2000, Eri's trio has been appearing regularly at Arthur's Tavern, a historic jazz club in New York's Greenwich Village.

Eri has also been collaborating with such creative and celebrated musicians as William Parker, Daniel Carter, Hamid Drake, Federico Ughi, Yves Leveille and Paul McCandless. Eri has appeared on five William Parker recordings, and has performed in the U.S., Canada, Italy, Holland, Norway, Tunisia, Portugal an South Africa with his trio and sextet.

Finally, Eri is a gifted educator. She received her master of music in education and composition from Shiga University, Japan. She has taught private lessons and workshops to jazz musicians of all instruments from the U. S., Japan, Europe, and North Africa.

 

For more information, please visit:

http://www.rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=243
]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Scott Bradlee's Postmodern Jukebox http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928443 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928443 Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre 1498608000 1498615200 Rochester International Jazz Festival - Steve Kuhn Trio http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928447 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928447 Eastman School, Kilbourn Hall 1498611600 1498615200

 

 

Over a career of a half-century and counting, Steve Kuhn has earned renown as one of the most lyrical and affecting pianists in jazz, with an unfailingly beautiful touch and a sophisticated sense of swing. "Steve is an original stylist," points out Dan Morgenstern, director of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers. "He's one of the finest pianists out there today." Jazziz magazine described Kuhn's distinctive sound: "Few other pianists, regardless of genre, can tease such an evocative range of timbres from their instrument. Kuhn's lower register is as dark and rich as Belgian chocolate, and his upper register has the light, translucent quality of ice-cold champagne."

 

For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=193

]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival - Vanessa Rubin http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928445 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928445 Eastman School Miller Center Sproull Atrium 1498615200 1498618800

 

Vanessa Rubin

Endowed with the kind of liquid phrasing and sheer wisdom that comes from depth of experience on the jazz performance campaign trail, Vanessa Rubin is an ever-evolving classic singer in the making. The development of a true jazz singer is a long-range prospect, laden with learning experiences that forge the voice into a true instrument, rich with passion, deeply invested in living through life's joys and perils; such is the journey of Vanessa Rubin, jazz singer extraordinaire. Capable of employing the gamut of emotions, the mature Ms. Rubin can range from whisper to shout in the blink of an eye; from honey-laden ballads purring like a kitten, to up tempo swinging and scatting like a fluent saxophone, she delivers the goods.

One of the surest tests of a jazz singer is her acceptance by skilled players; the relationship between instrumentalist and vocalist is so often fraught with distrust. Vanessa Rubin has never experienced such travails. From the time she joined the New York jazz community in the early 80s, under the guidance of such grandmasters as Barry Harris and Frank Foster, Rubin's acceptance has been universal. Instrumentalists have always been impressed by her way around a song, her willingness to flow with their muse, and her innate ability to swing that music.

The list of great musicians who have graced her recordings and bandstands is quite impressive: Monty Alexander, Cecil Bridgewater, Kenny Burrell, Frank Foster, Billy Higgins, Etta Jones, Lewis Nash, Houston Person, Patience Higgins, Don Braden, Toots Thielemans, Steve Turre, Cedar Walton, Grover Washington, Jr., and James Williams are just a few of the masters who've lent their skills to support Ms. Rubin's artistry. More recently she has completed auspicious global tours with Herbie Hancock, the Woody Herman Orchestra, and the Jazz Crusaders.

The range of material within Vanessa Rubin's broad comfort zone is impressive. It takes conviction and expertise to address the work of composers ranging from Ellington, Gershwin, and Weil to Dizzy Gillespie, Carmen McRae, Wayne Shorter and Sting. But all's well when Vanessa Rubin immerses her pearly tones in such a capacious range of material, not to mention her own considerable pallet of originals.

Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio to parents from Trinidad and Louisiana, Vanessa arrived steeped in great musical traditions. After achieving her Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism from Ohio State University, Rubin taught school for a number of years, all the while with both feet squarely in the jazz lexicon on a path towards a career in music. Along the way she played the regional joints and concerts, dabbled in band management, and continued to hone her skills.

By 1982 the jazz cauldron of New York City beckoned and she wisely knew it was that time. Landing at the Jazz Cultural Theater and the tutelage of Barry Harris and Frank Foster proved a wise move as it led not only to veteran acceptance, but to numerous renowned bandstands. Among those early gigs were stints with the likes of Kenny Barron, Pharoah Sanders, Lionel Hampton, and the Mercer Ellington Orchestra. These and subsequent affiliations are clear evidence that Rubin is not only singer, but a true musician. Ever the pragmatist, she kept a day job in the New York City school system for a minute, but it was clear that the bandstand would be her ultimate arena.

Clearly Vanessa Rubin's musical skills do not end on the bandstand. She's not only vocalist, lyricist, and composer, she's producer, arranger, savvy in artist & repertoire matters, educator (cited for Outstanding Service to Jazz Education by the International Association of Jazz Educators), music business consultant/facilitator, and music student adjudicator engaged by such auspicious institutions as the Thelonious Monk Institute, Jazz at Lincoln Center and the Kennedy Center. Labeled one of the "Diva Nouvelles" by Essence Magazine, Vanessa Rubin continues on a sure and true sojourn towards mastering her craft.

As a 2011 Kevin Klein Award Nominee for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Musical, Vanessa continues to demonstrate her chameleon like ability extending her gift of storytelling in the one woman theatrical portrayal of the great Billie Holiday in "Yesterdays, An Evening with Billie Holiday", while also interpreting many of Holiday's most remembered songs.

Although she began her professional singing career in Cleveland, where she sang with and managed a popular jazz quartet, Vanessa made the risky but wise move to New York in 1982. While word of her incredible voice spread throughout the jazz community, she studied with Barry Harris and Frank Foster at Harris' Jazz Cultural Theater. Early New York engagements were with nationally renowned artists such as Kenny Barron, Stanley Cowell, George Coleman, Pharoah Sanders, Paul West, Frank Foster's Loud Minority, the Lionel Hampton Big Band and the Mercer Ellington Orchestra. Still, the ever independent, practical vocalist hedged her bets. Having earned a BA from The Ohio State University School of Journalism, she supplemented her singing career by teaching, and serving as a Dean of Students in New York City's public school system. "Teaching," she said, "proved to be valuable in two ways. It provided a means for me to stay in New York; to be in the kind of environment I felt I needed to develop as a vocalist. And it uncovered a real passion I didn't know I had for helping troubled teenagers. My ultimate calling, however, was to sing."

 

For more information please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=202

]]>
Rochester International Jazz Festival: Tim Hagans Jazz Workshop http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133777 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=1133777 Eastman School Ray Wright Room 1498669200 1498674600

 

Open to all grade school and high school music students.

This series of five structured jazz workshops gives young music students the exceptional opportunity to play and meet, listen to and learn from professional jazz musicians performing at the festival. It is hosted by Bob Sneider, Eastman School of Music Assistant Professor of Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media and Senior Instructor of Jazz Guitar, and led by five musicians performing at XRIJF.

 For more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=330

 

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Rochester International Jazz Festival - George Cables http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928454 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928454 Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall 1498686300 1498689900

 

For ticketing and more information, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=244

When George Cables was going to school in New York City he used to walk the streets at night, taking in the cosmopolitan sights and sounds, mentally recording his encounters with "so many different kinds of people." In his musical career as well, Cables has prowled sidestreets and main thoroughfares in relative anonymity, absorbing countless influences into his personal style.

Born in New York City on November 14, 1944, Cables was classically trained as a youth and when he started at the "Fame" worthy High School of Performing Arts, he admittedly "didn't know anything about jazz." But he was soon smitten with the potential for freedom of expression he heard in jazz.

The young Cables was impressed by such keyboardists as Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea. But, he points out, "I never really listened to pianists when I was coming up. I would probably say I've been more influenced by Miles or Trane and their whole bands rather than by any single pianist. The concept of the music is more important than listening to somebody's chops, somebody's technique, The Way Miles' band held together, it was just like magic. You were transported to another world."

Cables attended Mannes College of Music for two years and by 1964 he was playing in a band called The Jazz Samaritans which included such rising stars as Billy Cobham, Lenny White. and Clint Houston. Gigs around New York at the Top of the Gate, Slugs, and other clubs attracted attention to Cables' versatility and before long he had recorded with tenor saxophonist Paul Jeffrey, played on Max Roach's "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and earned a brief 1969 tenure at the piano bench with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.

A 1969 tour with tenor titan Sonny Rollins took Cables to the West Coast. By 1971 he became a significant figure in the jazz scenes of Los Angeles, where he first resided, and San Francisco, where he also lived. Collaborations and recordings with tenor saxophonists Joe Henderson and Sonny Rollins ("Next Album:), trumpeters Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw ("Blackstone Legacy"), and vibist Bobby Hutcberson made Cables' wide-ranging keyboard skills, often on electric piano, amply evident. Demand for his sensitive accompaniment increased and by the end of the 1970s, Cables was garnering a reputation as everyone's favorite sideman.

Perhaps the most pivotal turn came when hard-bop legend Dexter Gordon invited Cables into his quartet in 1977. The two years he spent with the reappreciated tenor giant ignited Cables's passion for the acoustic piano and rimmersed him in the bebop vocabulary. "I don't feel that one should be stuck in the mud playing the same old stuff all the time, trying to prove that this music is valid," Cables says. "We don't need to prove anything. But I think you really have to be responsive to your heritage and then go on and find your own voice."

The longest standing relationship Cables developed in the late seventies was with alto saxophonist Art Pepper. Cables, who Pepper called "Mr. Beautiful," became Art's favorite pianist, appearing on many quartet dates for Contemporary and Galaxy, and joining Art for the extraordinary duet album, Goin' Home, that would be Pepper's final recording session. "I've been able to play with some of the greatest musicians in the world," Cables says, ..but it's funny, if you're not seen as a bandleader, doing the same thing alot of times, it's easy to wonder, `Well, who are you really? What do you really feel?' And sometimes I have to ask myself that, because every time I play with somebody different I have to put on a different hat."

He has performed and recorded with some of the greatest jazz musicians of our time, including: Joe Henderson, Roy Haynes, Max Roach, Art Blakey, Sonny Rollins, Freddie Hubbard, Woody Shaw, Sarah Vaughn, Tony Williams, Bobby Hutcherson and Dizzy Gillespie.

George Cables has emerged as a major voice in modern jazz. He is currenuy performing and recording as a soloist, with trio and larger ensembles, and as a clinician in college jazz programs. In addition to composing and arranging for his own albums, George Cables has contributed to recordings by Dexter Gordon, Art Pepper, Freddie Hubbard, Woody Shaw, Bobby Hutcherson and many others. He is noted for his fresh Interpretations of classic compositions and for his innovative style of writing.

 

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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Monty Alexander http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928449 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928449 Eastman School, Kilbourn Hall 1498687200 1498690800

 

For more information and for ticketing, please visit:

http://rochesterjazz.com/artists?artist_id=194

Fifty-five years after he moved to the United States from Kingston, Jamaica, his home town, pianist Monty Alexander is an American classic, touring the world relentlessly with various projects, delighting a global audience drawn to his vibrant personality and soulful message. His spirited conception is one informed by the timeless verities: endless melody-making, effervescent grooves, sophisticated voicings, a romantic spirit, and a consistent predisposition, as Alexander accurately states, "to build up the heat and kick up a storm." In the course of any given performance, Alexander applies those aesthetics to repertoire spanning a broad range of jazz and Jamaican musical expression-the American songbook and the blues, gospel and bebop, calypso and reggae. Like his "eternal inspiration," Erroll Garner, Alexander-cited as the fifth greatest jazz pianist ever in The Fifty Greatest Jazz Piano Players of All Time (Hal Leonard Publishing) and mentioned in Robert Doerschuk's 88: The Giants of Jazz Piano-gives the hardcore-jazz-obsessed much to dig into while also communicating the message to the squarest "civilian."

Born on D-Day, June 6, 1944, Alexander was playing Christmas carols by ear at 4, entertaining neighbors and relatives by 5, taking his first piano lessons at 6. He resisted formal instruction, but still, growing up in Kingston, absorbed all the musical flavors that comprise his mature sonic palette. "I soaked up everything-the calypso band playing at the swimming pool in the country, local guys at jam sessions who wished they were Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis, a dance band playing Jamaican melodies, songs that Belafonte would have sung," he recalls. When Alexander was 9, his father, a Kingston merchant, brought him to hear and play for the legendary pianist Eddie Heywood. At 10, he saw Nat "King" Cole play at Kingston's Carib Theater, the same venue where, at 13, he heard a concert featuring Louis Armstrong.

"I had one foot in the jazz camp and the other in the old-time folk music," Alexander says. "One was not more valuable than the other. Boogie-woogie was important to me, too. I'd sit at the piano and think I was the Count Basie Orchestra or a rhythm-and-blues band. I automatically reached for anything I wanted to play on the piano, and just played it. It didn't come with practicing. It came with playing, playing, playing all the time."

By 14, Alexander began to display his skills in local clubs. Soon thereafter, he made his first recordings, both as leader of a group called Monty and the Cyclones, and as a sideman for such legendary producers as Ken Khouri (Federal Records), Duke Reade (Treasure Isle), and Clement Coxsone Dodd at Studio One. These early sessions for Federal, which Alexander describes as "not calypso music, but the beginning of Ska," included such subsequently famous aspirants of the day as trombonist Don Drummond, tenor saxophonist Roland Alphonso and guitarist Ernest Ranglin.

But after moving to Miami with his mother in 1961, Alexander would sublimate Jamaican roots towards establishing a jazz identity. By 1963, he was ensconced in New York City, with a steady gig at Jilly's, the eponymous West 52nd Street piano bar owned by Frank Sinatra's close friend Jilly Rizzo. There, for the next four years, Alexander's trio swung until the wee hours of the morning for Sinatra, a mix of celebrity entertainers, tough guys, thrill seekers, and such iconic jazzfolk as Miles Davis, Count Basie, Milt Jackson, and Roy Haynes. As the 1960s progressed, he also held regular gigs at Minton's (the iconic Harlem lounge where bebop gestated) and at the Playboy Club, where he met and became friends with Quincy Jones. During these years, he also met Ray Brown and piano giant Oscar Peterson, who recommended Alexander to Hans Georg Brunner-Schwer, the proprietor of Germany's MPS label, for which he made a dozen records between 1971 and 1985.

Alexander's discography already included five leader LPs when he made his first MPS recording in 1971, with bassist Eugene Wright, drummer Duffy Jackson and conguero Montego Joe. By 1977, when Alexander made the tenth of his twelve sessions for MPS (Estate), he was internationally recognized as an upper-echelon master, deeply influenced by Brown's "let's party all night" approach to the piano trio function, as documented on two early '70s dates with Wright and drummer Bobby Durham (We've Only Just Begun and Perception) and another two with bassist John Clayton and drummer Jeff Hamilton (The Way It Is and Montreux Alexander), then rising stars, with whom he spent, by his estimate, 300 days a year on the road during their 1976-1978 association.

On most of his other MPS recordings, Alexander shared solo and ensemble duties with Ranglin, including the still-sampled groove albums Rass and Cobilimbo, on which he explicitly explored Jamaican folk roots. He did the same on Jamento (1978), his second of three recordings for Norman Granz's Pablo label, which introduced his "ivory and steel" concept of "marrying" steel pan (Vince Charles) and hand-drums (Larry McDonald) "to whatever bass player and drummer I had at the time." He would repeat this instrumentation on the 1980 album Ivory and Steel (Concord), with Othello Molineaux on pans and Bobby Thomas on congas, and again in 1988 on Jamboree (Concord).

That said, most of Alexander's 15 Concord recordings between 1978 and 1996 presented him in swinging trio contexts-five dates on which Brown and guitarist Herb Ellis reprised the roles they played with Oscar Peterson's drummerless trio of the '50s; effervescent sessions with Brown and drummers Hamilton or Frank Gant; a reunion with Clayton and Hamilton; a meeting with Clayton and ex-Peterson drummer Ed Thigpen titled The River that addressed spirituals and hymns (it was played at Jilly Rizzo's funeral); another project on which bassist John Patitucci and drummer Troy Davis flow through repertoire that Alexander played at Jilly's Bar. During these years, he also documented an inspiring solo recital at Maybeck Recital Hall for Concord; conversational duo encounters with Ranglin in 1980 and with Clayton in 1985 for MPS; and an impeccable one-off with bassist Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen and drummer Grady Tate for Soul Note.

Caribbean Circle (Chesky), from 1992, and Yard Movement (Island Jamaica Jazz), from 1996, previewed a series of albums for Telarc on which Alexander plays Anglophone Caribbean styles with musicians he'd known since his teens. (Island Records President Chris Blackwell created the Island Jamaica Jazz division specifically to release Yard Movement and an Alexander-produced Ranglin album called Below The Bass Line, which relaunched Ranglin's career.) Yard Movement represents a musical turning point, marking Alexander's first attempt to play acoustic grand piano with a straight-out reggae ensemble incorporating electric guitar and electric bass.

With Telarc, Alexander made further forays into this hybrid genre on a collaboration with drummer Sly Dunbar and bassist Robbie Shakespeare titled Monty Meets Sly and Robbie and on explorations of Bob Marley's music titled Stir It Up and Concrete Jungle, while addressing a broader Jamaican spectrum on Goin' Yard and Playin' Yard. All the while, Alexander was probing more deeply into mento, Jamaica's indigenous calypso. Descended from the French quadrille music to which English colonists danced in the nineteenth century, mento evolved into what Alexander calls "a deep country Jamaican thing" with African retentions-a banjo, a rhumba box that is akin to a bass kalimba, hand drums, and often harmonica, fiddle or pennywhistle. It spread throughout the island, and, as the 20th century unfolded, cross-pollinated with rhythm-and-blues and jazz, evolving into Ska.

"I was bummed out after it ended with John and Jeff because I'd gotten used to that precision, that projection," Alexander said. "Although other people were fine and good, no one came close to that. So I spent more time in Jamaica. It's simple music, two chords-but life is in those two chords."

As Alexander's explorations progressed, he found it ever more complicated to convene a single ensemble in which he could satisfactorily coalesce "things that reflect my heritage as an English-speaking Caribbean person" and his love for hard swinging jazz. "I would have a trio of jazz masters, and when I'd want to play something that reflected Jamaica, whether calypso or Bob Marley, I couldn't get that thing because that's not what they do," Alexander said. "Conversely, the Jamaican guys didn't relate to the jazz experience. I wanted to give myself an opportunity to share my two loves, which is one love, to coin Bob's phrase."

Midway through the '00s, Alexander began to resolve the issue with a project dubbed Harlem-Kingston Express, first documented on the Grammy-nominated 2011 CD, Harlem-Kingston Express: LIVE, and its 2014 Soultrain Award nominated followup, Harlem Kingston Express 2: The River Rolls On, both on Motéma. The band on both recordings is a double trio-Hassan Shakur on contrabass and either Herlin Riley or Obed Calvaire on drums, and Jamaicans Glen Browne or Courtney Panton on electric bass and Karl Wright on drums. "It fulfills me, because it's my own life experience," Alexander says. "It's like Barack Obama music. We are all cut from the same cloth."

In live performance with Harlem-Kingston Express, Alexander spontaneously orchestrates, switching-off from straight-ahead to two-worlds-meet. "I'm captain of the ship, and everything is freewheeling," he says. A boxing aficionado since his earlier days in Jamaica, he offers the sweet science as a metaphor. "It's like you go into the ring, and you throw the left, you throw the right-but whatever you throw, throw it right," he says. "There's almost always some kind of jet taking off when I transfer the music to one rhythm or the other. Whether it's 4/4 straightahead acoustic or a rhythm from Jamaica, it's cathartic. It's a bring-people-together thing, and the musicians enjoy each other. You can see the camaraderie, no matter who I've got. It's constantly, 'let's do it this way, let's do it that way.' It never gets old."

Meanwhile, Alexander continues to apply his creative, charismatic sensibility to the trio context, as demonstrated on Uplift and Uplift 2 (JLP), a pair of deep-swinging navigations of the American Songbook with Shakur on bass and Riley on drums on the former and either Clayton or Shakur on bass and either Hamilton or Frits Landesbergen on drums on the latter. It follows Alexander's 2008 trio dates, Calypso Blues: The Music of Nat King Cole and The Good Life: Monty Alexander Plays the Songs of Tony Bennett both on Chesky. Also in 2008, Bennett tapped Alexander as the featured pianist on A Swinging Christmas, with the Count Basie Orchestra.

"In our home, Nat Cole was the voice of America," says Alexander, who describes the Cole and Armstrong concerts to which his father took him in the 1950s as a transformational moment. In 1991, he worked with Cole's daughter, Natalie Cole, on Unforgettable, her 7-Grammy Award winning tribute album to her father. Other career highlights include a performance of George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" with a full orchestra under the direction of Bobby McFerrin at the Verbier Festival in Switzerland, and recording the piano track on four selections of the soundtrack of Bird, Clint Eastwood's Charlie Parker biopic, Clint Eastwood's Charlie Parker biopic, and playing on Quincy Jones' For Love Of Ivy film score.

Alexander would also perform on Jones' 1970 Smackwater Jack album, sharing piano duties with Herbie Hancock, and on classic albums with Dizzy Gillespie and Clark Terry live at the 1977 Montreux Jazz Festival. He was a member of the first iteration of Gillespie's United Nations Orchestra during the middle 1980s, and played a memorable engagement with Sonny Rollins in 1990 on the Hudson River Jazz Cruise in New York City.

In August 2000, the Jamaican government designated Alexander Commander in the Order of Distinction for outstanding services to Jamaica as a worldwide music ambassador. In 2015, the great modern pianist Donald Vega released With Respect To Monty, which included his interpretations of seven Alexander compositions. Furthermore, 2016 will mark the seventh edition of the namesake Monty Alexander Jazz Festival in Easton, Maryland, for which he has served as Artistic Director and perennial performer every Labor Day weekend since 2010.

"I grew up learning Nat Cole's songs, without knowing the titles, even before I knew about Sinatra," Alexander continues. "My awareness of his piano playing came later; it was just that smooth voice. When I was little, I confused him with Gene Autry-I was always connecting one thing with another: 'Wait a minute, that sounded like that.' That's why, even now, it's one world of music for me. I try to remove all the lines. Even though I do this thing and that thing and the other thing, at the end of the day it's Monty Alexander. I still seem to make people happy."

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Rochester International Jazz Festival - Shauli Einav Quartet http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928450 http://www.rochester.edu/Eastman/calendar?event&id=928450 Eastman School Miller Center Sproull Atrium 1498688100 1498691700