University of Rochester

Public Lectures

December 2014

Symposium Poster

"The Challenge of Preserving Heritage Buildings in Earthquake-Prone Areas: Applications to Peru"

​RAFAEL AGUILAR
Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru
Visiting Assistant Professor

Thursday, December 4th at 5:00 p.m.
University of Rochester, River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Gamble Room

Sponsored by the Programs of Archaeology, Technology and Historical Structures and Digital Media Studies, and the Departments of Art & Art History, History, and Mechanical Engineering.

November 2013

Symposium Poster

"CAJAMARCA: The First Encounter Between Two Worlds and the 500 Years After That"

ADRIANA SCALETTI CARDENAS
Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru
Visiting Assistant Professor

Tuesday, November 12th at 5:00 p.m.
University of Rochester, River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Gamble Room

Sponsored by the Program of Archaeology, Technology and Historical Structures, and the Departments of Anthropology, History, and Art and Art History.

November 2012

Peru Symposium Poster

"THE MOCHE NARRATIVES: Visual Media, Myth and History in Pre-Hispanic Northern Coast of Peru"

JULIO RUCABADO YONG
Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru
Visiting Assistant Professor

Thursday, November 29th at 5:00 p.m.
University of Rochester, River Campus, 321 Morey Hall

Sponsored by the Program of Archaeology, Technology and Historical Structures, and the Departments of Anthropology, Religion and Classics, and Art and Art History.

December 2011

Peru Symposium Poster

The Moche: Archaelogoy, Architecture and Society

Luis Jaime Castillo B., The Moche of Northern Peru
Thursday December 1st, 2011
6:30 p.m.
The Memorial Art Gallery

Santiago Uceda Castillo, The Moche Temples of Huaca de la Luna:
Social and Political Changes in the History of the Southern Moche

Thursday December 1st, 2011
7:30 p.m.
The Memorial Art Gallery

Architecture and Urban Development in Pre-Columbian Peru

Luis Jaime Castillo B., Moche Architectonic Models, Meaning and Context
Friday December 2nd, 2011
3:30 p.m.
Welles-Brown Room, University of Rochester

José Canziani Amico, City and Territory in the Andes.
Contributions to the History of Pre-Columbian Architecture

Friday December 2nd, 2011
4:30 p.m.
Welles-Brown Room, University of Rochester

April 2009

deGrummond Lecture

The Sanctuary of the Etruscan Artisans at Cetamura del Chianti, Italy

Dr. Nancy T. de Grummond
Friday April 17th, 2009
3:00 p.m.
Dewey 2-110E

Pratt Lecture

Imminent Ecologies—A talk by Professor Kevin Pratt

Thursday, April 9th, 2009
5:00 p.m.
Wells-Brown Room
(Rush Rhees Library)

March 2009

Galileo Anniversary

Celebrating the Four Hundredth Anniversary of Galileo's First Observation with the Telescope

Thursday, March 26th, 2009
4:30 - 6:30 p.m.
Robbins Library
(4th Floor, Rush Rhees)

February 2009

Oleson Lecture

"Harena sine calce: Building Disasters, Incompetent Architects, and Construction Fraud in Ancient Rome"

Professor John Peter Oleson
Department of Greek and Roman Studies, University of Victoria, Canada

Tuesday, February 17th at 5:00 p.m.
Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library
University of Rochester

The historical record tends to concentrate, for obvious reasons, on the many spectacular successes of Roman architectural design, engineering, and materials. The structures that remain for us to study, however, although numerous, represent the survivors of an intense, ongoing process of natural selection. How frequent in ancient Rome and the empire were construction problems or disasters caused by incompetent design or construction, poor materials, fraud, or unanticipated stresses? How many structures have been completely lost because of these and other factors? Are we in fact studying a sample of structures atypical in both their design and the quality of materials? This paper reviews the literary and archaeological evidence for construction failures in the Roman Empire in an attempt to answer these questions. The author is co-director of a project involving the analysis of cores of hydraulic concrete from Roman maritime structures.

Sponsored by: The Mellon Humanities Corridor, and Depts. of Religion & Classics, Mechanical Engineering, History, and Art & Art History.

October 2008

Hohlfelder Lecture

"A Roman Engineering Tour de Force: The Building of King Herod’s Harbor at Caesarea Maritima"

Professor Robert L. Hohlfelder
Department of History, University of Colorado, Boulder

Thursday, October 23rd at 5:00 p.m. (Reception at 4:30 p.m.)
Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library
University of Rochester

In approximately one decade (c. 23-15 BCE), local and Roman builders working for King Herod of JudATHS constructed at Caesarea Maritima (today’s Caesarea, Israel) the largest artificial harbor ever built in the open sea up to that point. The scale and complexity of this project, along with the rapidity of its execution, are remarkable even if judged by modern standards. It ranks as one of the most impressive engineering accomplishments of the Augustan Age. The construction of the harbor was made possible through the use of Roman hydraulic concrete, a building material developed in Campania (Southern Italy) c. 200 BCE and then employed extensively beginning in the Augustan Age (27 BCE – 14 CE). Underwater excavation and exploration have been carried out in the submerged ruins of Herod’s vast harbor complex almost continuously since 1960.

Sponsored by: The Mellon Humanities Corridor, Program of Archaeology Engineering and Architecture, and Departments of Religion & Classics, Mechanical Engineering, History, and Art & Art History at the University of Rochester.

April 2007

Lancaster Lecture

"Technological Innovation in Imperial Rome: What Can Ancient Concrete Tell Us about Roman Society?"

Dr. Lynne Lancaster
Department of Classical and World Religions, Ohio University

Thursday, April 26th at 5:30 p.m.
Gamble Room, Rush Rhees Library
University of Rochester

In this lecture I trace the role of a number of different structural techniques developed by the Romans to control loads and create stability in large complex concrete vaulted structures, such as the Colosseum, the Pantheon, and the imperial thermae. These techniques include the use of lightweight volcanic materials, metal tie bars, and external buttressing arches. The development of such techniques is then related to social, environmental, and economic changes within the Roman Empire, such as the development of the marble trade, the catastrophic results of the explosion of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 AD, and changing methods of taxation in late antiquity.

Sponsored by: The Mellon Humanities Corridor, and Departments of Religion & Classics, Mechanical Engineering, History, and Art & Art History at the University of Rochester.