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Undergraduate Advising

Advising Week

Peer advising

October 29 to November 2

This website is a work in progress. Please check back as additional events may be added. 

Each semester, during the week prior to registration, a number of special events are held so that students can meet with faculty, learn about academic opportunities, and prepare for registration. Advising Week events include departmental advising hours, a humanities-focused advising session with faculty from a number of disciplines, interest meetings, and the Undergraduate Research Fair. See the department/program advising information below for the specific opportunities and events.

Registration Dates and Times

Registration for the spring 2019 semester opens on Monday, 11/5.

For more specific registration information see the registration schedule for spring 2019.


Department/Program Advising Information

 

Humanities

African and African American Studies

Advising Week Contact


Department Website
Advising Session: Humanities

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in religion, classics, Jewish studies, philosophy, history, English, art history, studio art, anthropology, modern languages and cultures, and environmental humanities.

Food will be provided.

American Sign Language

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Classics

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in religion, classics, Jewish studies, philosophy, history, English, art history, studio art, anthropology, modern languages and cultures, and environmental humanities.

Food will be provided.

Dance and Movement

Highlighted Courses


DAN 202 — Dance and Peacebuilding

This course offers an introduction to Peacebuilding and Conflict Studies, while asking how dance and movement practices – experienced both as participants and spectators – can actively participate in creating a better world for individuals and communities. With perspectives drawn from diverse fields including psychology, anthropology, sociology, physiology, education and dance, students learn how conflict depletes individuals’ ability to interact with others and how dance practices can help replenish these capacities. Students also develop their leadership and facilitation skills through designing and implementing relevant movement activities for their peers.

DAN 247 — Moving Memories

This course connects University of Rochester students with senior citizens from senior living establishments to co-create artful works based on stories and narratives from the seniors’ past. Through a mutual exchange of stories, the elder and student participants, would co-create a performative piece reflective of an important memory from the senior’s past experience. Capitalizing on the abundance of wisdom and life experience the senior can offer, the students will craft a dance or performance piece responding to the chosen event with the creative input of the senior participant throughout. Both parties share in the narrative choice, content, title, and aesthetics of the new work. At the culmination of the course, the pieces will be performed at the senior living establishments as well as at the University of Rochester.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


T10/302 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Walk-in advising is in Spurrier DEN.

Advisors


Environmental Humanities

Students who want to declare a minor in environmental humanities, or who have questions about the environmental humanities program should email Professor Leila Nadir at lnadir@ur.rochester.edu.

For more information see the environmental humanities website.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website
English

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


W10/31Noon – 4 p.m.

Open advising is in 415 Morey Hall.

Advisors


Film and Media Studies

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


W10/3110 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Walk-in advising is in 511 Morey Hall.

Advisors


Jewish Studies

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in religion, classics, Jewish studies, philosophy, history, English, art history, studio art, anthropology, modern languages and cultures, and environmental humanities.

Food will be provided.

Modern Language and Cultures

See the department advising page for contact information and advising hours.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Pre-Registration Pizza Party

Friday, October 26, Noon – 1:30 p.m. — 401 Lattimore Hall

Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors. Food will be provided.

Music

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Philosophy

Highlighted Courses


PHL 257 — Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

Many people believe that very soon, artificial intelligence is going to be everywhere. Artificial systems will steer cars, ships, and planes, care for the sick, fight fires and fight wars for us, organize our schedules, order our food, etc. But what exactly is an artificial intelligence? And can there be artificial systems that truly think, or feel? In this course, we will address questions like these from a philosophical perspective. In doing so, we will encounter some of the most fundamental issues in the philosophy of mind—for example, what are thoughts and feelings, and how might they relate to physical states of our brains, or to computational states? We will then examine how artificial systems, such as artificial neural networks, function, and discuss what they might teach us about the mind in general and about human minds in particular. Finally, we will consider the consequences that the development and application of artificial intelligence might have for humanity.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


T10/301 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Open advising will be held in 525 Lattimore Hall.

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors. Food will be provided.

Religion

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in religion, classics, Jewish studies, philosophy, history, English, art history, studio art, anthropology, modern languages and cultures, and environmental humanities.

Food will be provided.

Writing, Speaking, and Argument

For questions regarding the primary writing requirement, stop by the front desk during our walk-in hours. For questions regarding the minor or clusters, see Professor Deb Rossen-Knill or attend our interest meeting.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


M10/299 a.m. – 5 p.m.
T10/309 a.m. – 5 p.m.
W10/319 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Th11/19 a.m. – 5 p.m.
F11/29 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Advising Events


Writing Studies Minor and Clusters Interest Meeting

Thursday, November 1, 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. — Rush Rhees Library, G-121A

Come enjoy pizza and learn more about the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program's minor and clusters!

Advisors


  • Minor and Clusters
  • Deb Rossen-Knill
  • deb.rossen-knill@rochester.edu
  • G-122 Rush Rhees Library
  • Monday, 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
    Wednesday, 3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
    Thursday, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
  • For questions regarding the minor or clusters, see Professor Deb Rossen-Knill or attend our interest meeting.

Natural Sciences and Engineering

Audio and Music Engineering

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Brain and Cognitive Sciences

Highlighted Courses


BCS 163 — Cognition and Writing

What goes on in writers’ minds when they write and in readers’ minds when they read? Can learning about what goes on in both writers’ and readers’ minds help writers make their writing more effective? In this course we will delve into the cognitive processes underlying writing and reading: how writers generate ideas, translate those ideas into words and sentences, organize those sentences into arguments, and do all of this while managing things like spelling and typing, and how readers actually interpret the message being conveyed by a piece of writing. We’ll also explore the extent to which research in cognitive science can inform what we do as writers by experimenting on ourselves with research-grounded strategies. Students will read and take responsibility for presenting work from cognitive scientists and composition theorists, and will work towards a final project in which they explore existing research on a topic of their choosing and propose either further research or applications of that research.

BCS 220 — The Intelligent Eye

Provides an interdisciplinary view of modern research into how the human brain solves the problems involved in perception, including how we perceive the three-dimensional structure of the world, how we recognize objects and how visual information is used to control action in the world. Students read contemporary research and, through classroom discussion and critical essays, explore and analyze the questions and debates that define contemporary perceptual science.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Biology

See the UPBM advising web page for track advisor information. This includes: biology, cell and developmental biology, biochemistry, computational biology, ecology and evolutionary biology, microbiology, molecular genetics, and neuroscience. See also the UPBM peer advisors web page.

Highlighted Courses


BIO 267 — Human Evolutionary Genetics

This course explores human evolution as revealed by data from genetics and genomics. Using principles from evolutionary and population genetics, we will learn how inferences are made about: human origins; the demographic and migration history of human populations; our relationship to, and interactions with, other archaic human species; the forces that have affected the evolution of functional elements in the human genome; the relationship between molecular genetic and phenotypic evolution; the interaction between cultural and biological evolution; and the causes and consequences of genetic and infectious diseases.

BIO 278 — Biochemical Mechanisms of Cellular Processes

This class applies biochemical concepts to describe the molecular mechanism of important cellular processes. Topics include the biochemistry of DNA repair, transcription, translation and protein degradation. Practical application of these concepts to biotechnology and medicine will also be covered.

BIO 273 — Writing for Grants, Fellowships, and Special Opportunities

How do you get funding to support yourself while conducting summer research? How do you draft a winning Fulbright fellowship essay? These are the types of questions that we want to help you answer! In this course, students will be guided through refinement of your persuasive writing skills culminating with a completed application for external funding. Depending on participant's interests the focus of this course may include writing CVs, biographies, statements of interests and summarizing the goals of their research – or other - project that they would like funded. This course will involve extensive revision based on peer and instructor feedback. The class can be used to fulfill 1 of the 2 required Upper-Level-Writing experiences in biology.

BIO 250 — Intro to Biochemistry with Lab

Fundamental aspects of biochemistry, including biomolecular structure and catalysis, bioenergetics, protein folding, kinetic analysis of enzyme action and general intermediary metabolism. In addition to lecture, the course will include a weekly workshop lab that integrates discussion with experimental procedures.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Society for Undergraduate Biology Students (SUBS) Halloween Trick-Or-Treat Meet and Greet

Friday, October 26, 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. — Hutchison Hall

Wear your best costume (or not) and join us in Hutchison Hall to meet faculty, visit research labs, and get advice on academics and research. Costume contest, donuts, cider, and candy!

Biochemistry Major Track Advisor Open Office Hours

Thursday, November 1, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. — Medical Center 3-7415

First-year and sophomore students are encouraged to stop in and speak with Elizabeth Grayhack, PhD.

Directions (pdf)

Advisors


Biomedical Engineering

Highlighted Courses


BME 415 — Neuroscience of Neuroprosthetics

This class examines the structure, function, and vulnerability of several major neural systems and how neuroprosthetics may ameliorate damage to them.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


BME Pre-registration S19

Wednesday, October 24, Noon – 4:30 p.m. — Munnerlyn Atrium

Chemical Engineering

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


W10/242 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Th10/25Noon – 2 p.m.

Open advising will be held in 4506 Wegmans Hall.

Chemistry

Drop-in/Open Advising Hours

The Department of Chemistry will have drop-in/open advising hours for chemistry faculty, staff, and peer advisors. Students are encouraged to stop by with any questions regarding chemistry courses, or planning a BA, BS, or minor in chemistry. No appointment is necessary. See the department's advising week web page for more details.

Transfer Credit/Course Approval Forms

Deb Contestabile or Professor David McCamant can both sign transfer credit and course approval forms. Please email them your course information in advance if possible.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website
Computer Science

Computer science pre-majors and majors will need to meet with their faculty advisor to go over courses and have their registration hold lifted.

Students will receive an email with your faculty advisor information. The faculty advisor list will also be posted on the bulletin board outside of Wegmans 2513.

Students whose advisors are on leave will be assigned temporary faculty advisors. Please consult your email and/or the list on the bulletin board for your temporary advisor.

If you are not yet a computer science major or pre-major, please use our online scheduling tool to make an appointment with Brynn Wilkins.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website
Data Science

Data science is an interdisciplinary field about principles and algorithms for extracting knowledge and insights from many kinds of data, including financial data, scientific data, natural language text, and images and video. Students learn to use techniques and theories drawn from mathematics, statistics, and computer science, including machine learning, data mining, inferential statistics, databases, and data visualization.

The data science program offers a BA and a BS. 

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Declared Majors Lunch

Friday, November 2, Noon – 1 p.m. — Wegmans 1201

Casual way to meet with other declared students, staff and advisors involved in data science. 

Advisors


Electrical and Computer Engineering

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Earth and Environmental Sciences

Highlighted Courses


EES 211 — Nature's Fury: Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tsunamis

We live on a dynamic planet. The seemingly tranquil, unchanging landscape of the Earth's surface is often interrupted by abrupt, catastrophic events. Earthquakes, landslides, and tsunamis lay waste to buildings, towns and sometimes entire cities. Dormant volcanoes come to life in explosions of lava and large volumes of aerosols and greenhouse gases, with implications for global climate change. In this course, we learn how these geological hazards are a violent manifestation of plate tectonics, the movement of the relatively rigid plates forming Earth's outer shell. The first third of the class focuses on the causative mechanisms of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, volcanic-eruption induced climate change. The second third outlines the consequent hazards and forecasting efforts, and feedbacks between these processes. The final third of the course examines mitigation programs, with numerous case studies.

EES 254 — Fundamental Physics and Numerical Modeling of Planetary Interiors

This course will offer an overview of planetary interiors based on physical and numerical analyses. Planetary interiors provide crucial insights into the formation of planets and their evolution. The course will review materials including (but not limited to) basic physics of star and planet formation, planetary materials under high pressures, gravity fields, planetary impacts, magnetic fields, mantle convection, and exoplanet observations. Numerical analyses and data visualization are important aspects of the lectures and homework assignments. Basic coding skills are required.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Mechanical Engineering

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Advising Session for First-Year Students

Wednesday, October 31, 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. — 224 Hopeman Building

Advising Session for Sophomores

Thursday, November 1, 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. — 224 Hopeman Building

Mathematics

Advising Week Contact


Advisors


  • Mark Herman
  • 808 Hylan Hall
  • Wednesday, 1:30 p.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Naomi Jochnowitz
  • 1009 Hylan Hall
  • Monday, 3:40 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.
    Wednesday, 3:40 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.
  • Kalyani Madhu
  • 815 Hylan Hall
  • Monday, Noon – 1:30 p.m.
  • Carl Mueller
  • 802 Hylan Hall
  • Monday, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
    Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. – Noon
  • Amanda Tucker
  • 818 Hylan Hall
  • Tuesday, 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Neuroscience

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Optics

Advising Week Contact


Department Website
Physics and Astronomy

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Fall Advising Lunch

Friday, October 19, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. — 208 Bausch and Lomb Hall

Please join us for a pizza lunch along with information and advice about registering for physics and astronomy courses.

Advisors


Statistics

Highlighted Courses


STT 214 — Biostatistics

This course will familiarize students with statistical concepts necessary to evaluate the primary literature in the biological sciences. It will improve students’ statistical literacy and sharpen analytical thinking. Topics covered in the course will include: descriptive statistics and graphics, estimation, elementary probability theory, statistical distributions, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, experimental design, correlation, analysis of variance and regression. If students would like to learn R, students should consider the lab, BIO 218P. The lab is not required for BIO 214.

STT 223 — Introduction to Bayesian Inference

In this course, the Bayesian approach to statistical inference will be explored. Topics to be discussed include single and multiple parameter models under conjugacy, uninformative and informative prior distribution specifications, hierarchical models, model checking, and modern computational techniques for posterior distribution approximation (e.g. Markov chain Monte Carlo). Basic familiarity with the R computing environment is assumed, as the course includes extensive R programming. Applications will be drawn from across the social and natural sciences, providing a strong foundation for applied data analyses within the Bayesian statistical framework.

STT 276 — Statistical Computing in R

This course offers an introduction to statistical computing in the R environment. To start, focus is placed on assigning objects, creating data structures, applying Boolean logic, importing and subsetting data, data manipulation (both long and short formats), and implementing elementary commands and built-in functions from R packages. In the second portion of the course, students learn more advanced topics of writing loops, developing functions, building graphics, debugging code, and text mining. Topics will be illustrated using key statistical tools, including basic data summarization and exploration, linear models, and simulations. The course will rely upon the use of R Markdown as an essential tool for effectively integrating R code and output into presentable reports. Basic skills with a text editor (such as Notepad) and Microsoft Excel are assumed, as is basic knowledge of statistical inference.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Statistics
  • Joseph Ciminelli
  • joseph.ciminelli@rochester.edu
  • 708 Hylan Hall
  • Tuesday, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
    Wednesday, 10 a.m. – Noon
    Thursday, 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Social Sciences

Anthropology

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors. Food will be provided.

Advisors


Business

Highlighted Courses


MKT 237 — Digital Marketing

This course will provide students with a theoretical understanding of the digital marketplace - with the increasingly complex customer journey at the heart of it – necessary to adapt and manage through its constant changes, while also offering enough hands-on experience across individual digital tactics that students can bring immediate value to their organizations and/or understand how and where to develop deeper expertise in a particular area that most serves their careers. By the end of the course, students will be able to walk into any company boasting a stronger digital profile and elevating how they use the Internet to better deliver on the customer experience and the business objectives.

FIN 234 — Portfolio Theory and Analytics

This course will focus on selected issues that arise in the theory and practice of investment portfolio management. Many of the topics will be specific to common stock portfolios, but are also relevant to other assets, such as bonds, options, futures, commodities, etc. Key topics include active portfolio management, empirical evidence of market (in)efficiencies, market “anomalies,” performance evaluation, behavioral finance, risk management. The course also examines the impact of market structure on trading decisions, including the role of specialists, dealers and brokers, the price impact of trading, price discovery, and the special needs and behaviors of institutional traders.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


M10/2910 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
T10/301 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
W10/311 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Advising Events


Business Alumni Panel

Friday, November 9, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. — Sloan Auditorium

We are hosting an alumni panel for all current and prospective business majors. Four recent alums come back and answer student questions, talk about their experiences and how they got to where they are today. There will be a short networking reception to follow.

Economics

Faculty advisors are available for consultation during weekday office hours and by appointment. See the advising page of the economics website for more information.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website
History

Students choose an advisor based on their interests. Our faculty office/walk-in hours and specialty area are listed in the advisors section below.

Highlighted Courses


HIS 126 — Hitler’s Germany

This course revolves around the most essential question in modern German history: was Hitler's regime particular to Germany, German culture, and German society, or was it merely the manifestation of an imminent quality in all modern nation states? What does it mean to compare any political figure to Hitler? Was his kind of "evil" sui generis or dangerously banal? This course places the rise and fall of the Nazi Party and Hitler in the longer duree of German history, from the Second Empire and WWI, to Weimar, the Nazi State, and the Two Germanys of the Cold War.

HIS 200 — Pirates of the Caribbean

This introductory research seminar considers the historical realities of piracy and imperial rivalry in the Early Modern Atlantic World and the popular mythology it has spawned in the past two centuries. Students will read primary sources and contending historical interpretations of piracy, see films about piracy, and play a pirate simulation game to develop critical historical reading, thinking, and writing skills.

HIS 228 — North Africa and the Middle East since 1838

North Africa and the Middle East is in a mess: Instead of democracy, the Arab Spring delivered a military dictatorship to Egypt; Iraq and Syria are melting into warring tribal enclaves; Saudi Arabia is waging a savage war in Yemen; and the Palestinians remain an unprotected stateless people. There is a crisis, and this course introduces students to the predicament, arguing that since the first Industrial Revolution in England, the peoples of North Africa and the Middle East have refashioned their destinies in partnership with the West. Students will examine how the following encounters helped make the region as we know it: the Anglo-Turkish Convention of 1838, transition from Ottoman to West European colonialism, discovery of huge and easily extractable oil reserves, creation of the state of Israel, the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the US Invasion of Iraq in 2003. The class will also explore how the above patterns of engagement shaped the histories of the region’s working classes, women, and the peasantry.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Undergraduate Registration Open House

Friday, November 2, 2 p.m. – NaN:NaN a.m. — 362 Rush Rhees Library

History department faculty and staff will be available to answer questions and help students with course planning. Students can also meet with one of our faculty advisors to discuss declaring a major or minor in history.

Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors. Food will be provided.

Advisors


Linguistics

Highlighted Courses


LIN 204 — Linguistic Thought from the Ancient World to the Modern

This course looks at key ideas in linguistics, starting in Babylon and Ancient China and working towards the study of meaning in modern linguistic theory and philosophy of language. Among the topics we will look at are: writing and its influence on grammatical traditions; the advent of historical linguistics, linguistic phylogeny, and the comparative method; European structuralism; American structuralism; variation within and across languages; the rise of generative grammar; Chomsky’s philosophy of linguistics, including competence and I-language; literal meaning and beyond. Students will be expected to read a selection of primary literature and participate actively in class discussion. The course will be assessed by essays (essay questions and readings lists for each essay to be provided). Prerequisites: LIN 110, and any 200-level Linguistics course (or permission of the instructor).

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


Th11/11:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Walk-in advising is in 504 Lattimore Hall.

Public Health-Related Programs

To declare public health majors and minors students must first contact Jennifer Sherwood in the Multidisciplinary Studies Center to set up an appointment to create a tentative schedule.

Highlighted Courses


PH 201W — Environmental Health

This course covers the basic principles used to evaluate the potential human health risk of exposure to environmental contaminants in air, water, and food.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Health, Behavior, and Society Advisor
  • Professor Nancy Chin
  • nancy_chin@urmc.rochester.edu
  • 424 Lattimore Hall
  • Tuesday, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Wednesday, 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Bioethics Advisor
  • Professor Richard Dees
  • richard.dees@rochester.edu
  • 529 Lattimore Hall
  • Monday, 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.
  • Advising also available by appointment.
  • Epidemiology and Environmental Health Advisor
  • Professor Edwin van Wijngaarden
  • edwin_van_wijngaarden@urmc.rochester.edu
  • Saunders Research Building (Medical Center campus), Room 3.313
  • Advising by appointment only.
Political Science/International Relations

The Department of Political Science has seven faculty members designated as undergraduate advisors. Their names and office hours are listed on the advisors and office hours web page. Advising office hours are available every day of the week.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Political Science Advising Week Open House

Tuesday, October 30, 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. — Humanities Center Conference Room

Several faculty members and the department's peer advisors will comment on the spring semester course offerings in political science and international relations. They will be available to discuss individual registration choices and answer any questions.

Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology

Highlighted Courses


PSY 248 — Social Neuroscience (MW 10:25-11:40)

Human beings are fundamentally social animals equipped with a brilliant piece of social machinery: the brain. Through the workings of this elegant electrical and biological machine we are able to reason about other people's unobservable thoughts, emotions, and intentions, make moral judgments, and communicate with others. How does the brain develop the ability to accomplish these tasks? What regions of the brain are involved and what computations do they perform? How is this neural machinery affected by the social environment and psychiatric illness? In this course, we will examine the latest research in human social neuroscience towards answering these and related questions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


Th11/111 a.m. – Noon
F11/22 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Walk-in hours will be held in Meliora 441.

Advisors


  • Peer Advising
  • Thao Hoang
  • 450 Meliora Hall
  • Monday, 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
  • Peer Advising
  • Brandon Reinkensmayer
  • 450 Meliora Hall
  • Tuesday, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Peer Advising
  • Megan Scroger
  • 450 Meliora Hall
  • Monday, 1:30 p.m. – 2 p.m.
    Wednesday, 1:30 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Interdisciplinary Studies

American Studies

For additional information, contact Heather Morens at heather.morens@rochester.edu in 203 Lattimore Hall or call (585) 276-5305.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Archaeology, Technology, and Historical Structures

Highlighted Courses


ATH 212 — Archaeology of African Diaspora

The course will examine the nature and culture of the African Diaspora as found on the African continent, Europe, the Americas and elsewhere. Among key issues on which the course will focus are variability, continuity and change in the cultures of different groups of Diasporan Africans, and relationships that are found between major environmental challenges as well as historical events such as the Islamic Jihads, Trans-Saharan Trade, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, colonialism, and Plantation Slavery in West Africa and the relocation and redistribution of African populations in Africa. A critical component of this class examines the historical, ethnographic, and archaeological research done in Africa, Europe, and the Americas to inform the student about theories and interpretations concerning the African Diaspora.

ATH 221 — Prehistory of Ancient Peru: The Incas and Their Ancestors

This course will review the prehistory of ancient societies in the Andes, which will begin from the peopling of the continent to the conquest of the Inca Empire by the Spanish. Students will become familiar with Andean chronologies as well as the prehispanic cultures of Chinchorro, Caral, Chavin, Pukara, Paracas, Moche, Nasca, Wari, Tiwanaku, Chimú, and the Inca, among others. Special attention will be paid to how these societies adapted to the diverse ecology of the Andes. Topics include the history of Peruvian archaeology; plant and animal domestication; the development of social complexity, the emergence of religion; prehispanic art and symbolism; ancient technology, economies and trade; and urbanism. The course includes material from archaeological investigations and interpretations as well as ethnohistoric and ethnographic sources.

ATH 312 — Ethnoarchaeology of Africa

Ethnoarchaeology is the ethnographic study of peoples for archaeological reasons, usually through the study of the material remains of a society. Ethnoarchaeology aids archaeologists in reconstructing ancient lifeways by studying the material and non-material traditions of modern societies. This course will examine ethnoarchaeological work in Africa that is sensitive to the daily realities of peoples' lives while it simultaneously builds the types of knowledge necessary for ethnoarchaeology to meet its important cognitive role within archaeological research. Examples will be drawn from research with potters and consumers, iron smelters, pastoralists, artists, and ethno-pharmacologists in West Africa, Southern Africa, and Eastern Africa. The course will guide the student to understand what ethnoarchaeology is, and to acquire skills, which would enable her or him to practice it. Lectures will be combined with class discussions of specific case studies.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


ATHS Mandatory Advising Session

Friday, November 2, 9 a.m. – Noon — 415 Hopeman Hall

In preparation for registering for the spring 2019 semester, all ATHS students (majors and minors) must meet with Professor Perucchio, ATHS director, to review their program on Friday, November 2 from 9 a.m.-noon in Hopeman 415 (Professor Perucchio's office). This is a walk-in session, you don't need to reserve a time. Please contact Professor Perucchio in advance at renato.perucchio@rochester.edu to confirm that you will make this meeting.

ATHS Open House

Wednesday, October 31, 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. — 307 Rettner Hall

Learn about the Archaeology, Technology, and Historical Structures major/minor, including courses, research, and archaeology field school opportunities in Ghana, Bermuda, Italy, and Peru. Pizza and cookies will be provided!

Advisors


  • ATH Program Director
  • Professor Renato Perucchio
  • renato.perucchio@rochester.edu
  • 415 Hopeman Hall
  • Tuesday, 11 a.m. – Noon
    Thursday, 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Digital Media Studies

Digital Media Studies Program is now offering a DMS Minor!  The DMS minor consists of six courses and can be in either the humanities or natural sciences. Learn more on the DMS minor requirements web page.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Professor Michael Jarvis
  • michael.jarvis@rochester.edu
  • 455 Rush Rhees Library
  • Wednesday, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Advising is also available by appointment.
East Asian Studies

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Legal Studies

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Anthropology
  • Professor Kristine Doughty
  • kristin.doughty@rochester.edu
  • 437 Lattimore Hall
  • Tuesday, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Advising is also available by appointment.
Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Highlighted Courses


ENG 243 — Don Quixote: The Book, The Myth, The Image

This course entails a close reading of the novel in English translation, coupled with a focus on the ways in which both the novel and/or protagonist have been adapted, adopted, interpreted or incorporated by various criteria and popular traditions both inside and outside of Spain from the time of its original publication in 1605 through the 21st century. We will examine several filmic adaptations, illustrations and paintings as well, with an eye toward critically examining the problemaatic employment of Don Quixote as an icon of Pan-Hispanic culture. However, we will continually return to the novel as our anchor throughout the course, while assessing the constantly changing ways in which contemporary readers and scholars approach the text. Course is taught in English.

*Students taking the course for Spanish credit will do the bulk of the work in Spanish.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Modern Languages and Cultures: Italian
  • Professor Donatella Stocchi-Perucchio
  • donatella.stocchi-perucchio@rochester.edu
  • 405 Lattimore Hall
  • Monday, 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
    Wednesday, 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
  • Advising also available by appointment.
  • Modern Languages and Cultures: Spanish
  • Professor Ryan Prendergast
  • (585) 275-4113
  • ryan.prendergast@rochester.edu
  • 430 Lattimore Hall
  • Tuesday, 9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
    Thursday, 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
  • Advising also available by appointment.
Sustainability Studies

Highlighted Courses


EES 119 — Energy and Society

National and worldwide patterns of production and consumption of renewable and non-renewable energy sources and the connection of those patterns to socioeconomic conditions. For each resource, we consider the environmental effects of extraction, distribution, and consumption; how efficiently the resource is used and for what end uses; current reserves and projections for the future; socioeconomic and political factors affecting the resource's utilization. The course addresses interactions between energy use and climate change, food and water resources.

PHL 135 — Environmental Ethics

An examination of central concepts and issues in environmental ethics, including the nature of and responsibility for current environmental crises, the varying responsibilities of individuals, institutions, and nations, the importance of sustainability, and the ultimate principles and values at stake.

PSC 247 — Green Markets

In recent years, there has been much discussion of the possibility of a green economy. This course examines the potential for "green markets," focusing on three drivers-social, political, and economic-that can both constrain firms and potentially condition whether issues of environment and sustainability can be exploited as a means for competitive advantage. Among issues covered will be demand and willingness to pay for green goods, the roles of NGOs and investors, regulation and its alternatives, firm reputation and product differentiation, supply chain management, and green production processes. Special attention will be given to the need of firms to deal with climate change now and in the future.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


T10/301 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Th11/11 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Open advising will be held in 202 Hutchison Hall.

Advisors


Other Advising Week Opportunities

Advising Session: Humanities

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in religion, classics, Jewish studies, philosophy, history, English, art history, studio art, anthropology, modern languages and cultures, and environmental humanities.

Food will be provided.

Center for Education Abroad

Peer advisors are available during walk-in hours to answer quick questions and to begin the process of going abroad. These meetings are limited to a maximum of 10 minutes. If you have a more in-depth question, please schedule a 30-minute appointment with an education abroad advisor. Call (585) 275-7532 or stop by our office to make an appointment.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


M10/292 p.m. – 4 p.m.
T10/303 p.m. – 5 p.m.
W10/312 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Th11/111 a.m. – Noon
Th11/12 p.m. – 5 p.m.
F11/211 a.m. – Noon
F11/21 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Advising Events


Education Abroad Open House

Thursday, November 1, 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Dewey Hall Main Lobby

Meet study abroad returnees and our staff in an informal setting. Study abroad is available to students in any major. Service learning, internships, and research are also offered. It's never too early to find out about your education abroad options!

Gwen M. Greene Center for Career Education and Connections

Health Professions Peer Advising Drop-In Hours (230 Genesee Hall)

Monday 8-9 p.m.
Tuesday 5-6 p.m.
Wednesday 5-6 p.m.
Thursday 5-6 p.m.

This is a great opportunity for students to engage with their peers and ask questions about course planning and pre-requisites, access to online resources, how your peers obtained research opportunities and joined on-campus activities and much more!

 

Highlighted Courses


CAS 104 — ROC Your Life (+Your Career!)

ROC Your Life is a dynamic, seven-week, 1 credit course that applies a design-thinking framework and mindset to career exploration and development. Through self-reflection, readings, discussion and in-class activities, students will be able to architect their experiences at Rochester and beyond, and be better equipped to navigate academic, career and life decisions. This course is open to first-year and sophomore students in both the fall and spring semesters.

Online — Clinical Research Readiness Program

Students interested in working with human subjects in a health-related research or internship position can complete all necessary certifications by completing this zero-credit, self-paced online course. Check out the registration details for further information.

Advising Week Contact


Advising Events


Career Exploration Workshop

Monday, October 29, Noon – 1 p.m. — 401 Douglass Commons

Not sure what you can or should do with your degree? Have you discovered the path you thought you were on may no longer be the right one for you? Feeling lost and confused when it comes to career options? Come to this workshop!

In a small group and for just one hour, discuss the myths and challenges of career exploration, resources available to help you move forward and begin creating action steps to help you make informed decisions relating to your career.

Appropriate for all class years and majors. Registration in Handshake is recommended but not required to attend.

What About Me?: Making Academic and Career Decisions Workshop

Thursday, November 1, 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. — Greene Center Conference Room, 4-200 Dewey Hall

Not sure if you're making the right choices when selecting courses, majors or possible careers? Feeling "stuck" and wondering what to try next? Know yourself better so you can make better decisions and build your way forward! Attendees are strongly encouraged to take the Sokanu Career Inventory prior to attending this workshop.

Office of Undergraduate Research

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


M10/292 p.m. – 4 p.m.
W10/312 p.m. – 4 p.m.
F11/210 a.m. – Noon

Advising Events


Undergraduate Research Fair

Tuesday, October 30, 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. — Feldman Ballroom, Douglass Commons

To help provide students with local, discipline-specific guidance about getting started in undergraduate research, the Office of Undergraduate Research holds an annual undergraduate research fair each fall. Patterned after the study abroad fair and the academic open houses, there will be tables populated by knowledgeable experts from each department/program who can answer questions concerning undergraduate research in that discipline. The fair connects undergraduates looking for research experiences with departments, labs, and other resources that can help that search.