PSC 518 Emergence of the Modern Congress

Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every 2-3 years

Gerald Gamm
Spring 2015 — M 12:30-15:15

Through intensive reading and discussion, we will analyze major issues in congressional history and legislative institutions. We will examine the basic institutions of the House and Senate--committees, parties, leaders, and rules. Topics include the development of careerism, the seniority system and the "textbook Congress," electoral linkages, divided government, institutional reforms, and partisan polarization. The course is designed to introduce students to the principal approaches used by political scientists to study Congress, with special emphasis on the development of congressional institutions over time. This is an advanced seminar, primarily for graduate students but open also to juniors and seniors with substantial background in political science, economics, and history.

Gerald Gamm
Spring 2013 — M 14:00-16:40

Course Syllabus

Through intensive reading and discussion, we will analyze major issues in congressional history and legislative institutions. We will examine the basic institutions of the House and Senate--committees, parties, leaders, and rules. We will also examine the development of careerism, the seniority system, agenda-setting, electoral concerns, the relationship between Congress and the president, divided government, and efforts at institutional reform. The course is designed to introduce students to the principal approaches used by political scientists to study Congress, with special emphasis on the development of congressional institutions over time. This is an advanced seminar, primarily for graduate students but open also to juniors and seniors with substantial background in political science, economics, and history.

Gerald Gamm
Spring 2004

Through intensive reading and discussion, we will analyze major issues in congressional history and legislative institutions. We will examine the basic institutions of the House and Senate--committees, parties, leaders, and rules. We will also examine the development of careerism, the seniority system, agenda-setting, electoral concerns, the relationship between Congress and the president, divided government, and efforts at institutional reform. The course is designed to introduce students to the principal approaches used by political scientists to study Congress, with special emphasis on the development of congressional institutions over time. This is an advanced seminar, primarily for graduate students but open also to juniors and seniors with substantial background in political science, economics, and history.