PSC 211 Public Opinion and Voting

Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

Richard G. Niemi
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55

Course Syllabus

Through lecture, readings, and discussion, we will consider major questions involving public opinion and voting. How much do citizens know about government and politics? Does participation make a difference? Do elected officials do what the public wants? We will pay special attention to generational matters. Today's young people (that's you) are said to be uninterested and uninvolved in politics, yet voluntary community service has never been higher. How do we reconcile these facts, and what do we make of it? We will also cover sampling techniques and the interpretation of poll results: when you hear that 70% of the respondents to a national survey support gun control, can you believe it? What else do you need to know in order to interpret results?

Richard G. Niemi
Fall 2011 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55

Course Syllabus

Through lecture, readings, and discussion, we will consider major questions involving public opinion and voting. How much do citizens know about government and politics? Does participation make a difference? Do elected officials do what the public wants? We will pay special attention to generational matters. Today's young people (that's you) are said to be uninterested and uninvolved in politics, yet voluntary community service has never been higher. How do we reconcile these facts, and what do we make of it? We will also cover sampling techniques and the interpretation of poll results: when you hear that 70% of the respondents to a national survey support gun control, can you believe it? What else do you need to know in order to interpret results?

Richard G. Niemi
Fall 2009 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55

Course Syllabus

Through lecture, readings, and discussion, we will consider major questions involving public opinion and voting. How much do citizens know about government and politics? Does participation make a difference? Do elected officials do what the public wants? We will pay special attention to generational matters. Today's young people (that's you) are said to be uninterested and uninvolved in politics, yet voluntary community service has never been higher. How do we reconcile these facts, and what do we make of it? We will also cover sampling techniques and the interpretation of poll results: when you hear that 70% of the respondents to a national survey support gun control, can you believe it? What else do you need to know in order to interpret results?