Courses — Fall 2012

For official course schedules, restrictions, classrooms, and current enrollments, check the Registrar's schedule.
More current syllabi and course information might be available for students on my.rochester.edu.

Political Science

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2012 — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course will introduce students to comparative politics and the study of domestic political institutions, processes, and outcomes across and within countries. These important themes and concepts of contemporary comparative politics include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution and the power of ethnicity. Cases will be drawn from different countries and historical periods to give students a grounding in the method of comparative analysis. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science or international relations and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of developed and developing countries.

PSC 104 Introduction to Political Philosophy

James Johnson
Fall 2012 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy, Introductory Courses
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course is most aptly called Thinking About Politics. It aims to examine a range of contemporary issues and to explore the political and philosophical conflicts and controversies that those issues raise. So, for example, we might examine the concepts of patriotism and explore the tensions that arise between it and such other concepts as democracy or freedom or dissent or security. Readings will be drawn both from contemporary sources and classic political thought.

PSC 200 Applied Data Analysis

Matthew Blackwell
Fall 2012 — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

Data analysis has become a key part of many fields including politics, business, law, and public policy. This course covers the fundamentals of data analysis, giving students the necessary statistical skills to understand and critically analyze contemporary political, legal, and policy puzzles. Lectures will focus on the theory and practice of quantitative analysis and weekly lab sessions will guide students through the particulars of statistical software. No prior knowledge of statistics or data analysis is required.

PSC 202 Argument in Political Science

Gerald Gamm
Fall 2012 — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: Required Course
Typically offered every year

Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Issues include tyranny of the majority, slavery, individual rights, civic engagement, parties and interest groups, international diplomacy, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists.

PSC 203 Survey Research Methods

Michael Peress
Fall 2012 — MW 14:00-15:15
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

This course offers an introduction to the understanding of politics through data analysis, with particular emphasis on surveys of the mass public. We will study selecting a sample, designing and conducting a survey, interpreting the results of a survey, correcting for bias in a survey, and measuring the accuracy of a survey. This semester, we will pay special attention to the accuracy of public opinion polling preceding the 2008 primary and Presidential elections. PSC 203 satisfies the Techniques of Analysis requirement for undergraduate majors and minors in political science.

PSC 211 Public Opinion and Voting

Richard G. Niemi
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

Through lecture, readings, and discussion, we will consider major questions involving public opinion and voting. How much do citizens know about government and politics? Does participation make a difference? Do elected officials do what the public wants? We will pay special attention to generational matters. Today's young people (that's you) are said to be uninterested and uninvolved in politics, yet voluntary community service has never been higher. How do we reconcile these facts, and what do we make of it? We will also cover sampling techniques and the interpretation of poll results: when you hear that 70% of the respondents to a national survey support gun control, can you believe it? What else do you need to know in order to interpret results?

PSC 215 American Elections

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — MW 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This semester, special attention will be paid to upcoming presidential and congressional elections. Campaign finance reform is also a timely topic. We will examine the role of money in elections and strategies for regulating its use. Other issues of current concern will include party polarization and gridlock in Congress, and the recently completed redistricting process for US House elections.

PSC 223 Constitutional Structure and Rights

Thomas H. Jackson
Fall 2012 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

In this course, through the lens of the Constitution and Supreme Court cases, we examine the essential structure of the American legal system (both separation of powers at the federal level and the authority of, and relationship among, states and the federal government), as well as the essential nature of civil rights of citizens vis-a-vis the political order. Topics covered include the nature of the Supreme Court's authority; separation of powers; federal limits on state powers; and individual rights, including economic rights, certain of the rights embraced by the First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendments, and equal protection rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. The ability to read and discuss (as well as place in perspective and disagree with) Supreme Court opinions is an essential part of the course.

PSC 225 Race and Political Representation


Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — R 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

Despite gains made by racial and ethnic minorities in the areas of civil and voting rights, race remains a major source of cleavage in American politics. This upper-level course introduces students to the concepts, theories, and methodological approaches that political scientists use to examine the intersection of racial politics and political representation in the American political context. We will examine democratic theory, the Voting Rights Act, public opinion and electoral behavior, elected officials and public policies, and the effect of electoral rules and districting decisions on minority representation in Congress. This course has considerable reading, writing, and discussion requirements and may best suit experienced juniors and seniors.

PSC 234 Law and Politics in the U.S.

Maya Sen
Fall 2012 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

How does the Supreme Court really decide cases? Are judges as activist as politicians claim? In this course, we will explore these questions by addressing how political and social forces influence American law and legal institutions, and vice versa. We will explore in depth how the legal system operates and how judges actually decide cases, using examples taken from today's headlines. We will also explore contemporary controversies surrounding the courts, including the influence of politics in judicial decision making and the possible role that race plays in criminal trials. Other topics include the structure of the legal system, the importance of judicial precedent, litigation and trial processes, and effectiveness of the law as a force for social change.

PSC 236 Health Care and the Law

Margie Hodges Shaw
Fall 2012 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Typically offered every year

This course provides an introduction to the legal foundations of health care in America. It is the responsibility of the American government to promote and protect the health and welfare of the public while respecting the interests, and upholding the rights, of the individual. The content of this course addresses how the law balances these collective and individual rights. The material covers a broad range of legal issues in health care, including autonomy, privacy, liberty, and proprietary interests, from the perspective of the provider(s) and the patient.

PSC 237 Domestic Social Policy

Bruce Jacobs
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — MW 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

An examination of major policy issues at the federal level. The normative justifications for governmental actions are discussed as well as the limitations imposed by bureaucracy and the decision-making process. Governmental programs that affect the poor are examined in detail, with special attention paid to an assessment of their impact and alternatives now under consideration.

PSC 238 Business and Politics

David Primo
Fall 2012 — TR 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

The focus of this course is the conflict and cooperation between business and government, with an emphasis on U.S. domestic politics. We will cover a broad range of issues affecting the business world, including regulation, lawmaking, the mass media, interest group activism, and crisis management. The course will connect ongoing political debates to theory, and guest speakers will bring their business and political experience to our class. Each meeting will feature a general topic, as well as in-depth analyses of real-world cases related to that topic. What happens when Wal-Mart tries to open a new store in a city with strong unions? Who is opposed to grocery stores selling wine, and why? How did General Motors fight back against a media report critical of its products? Is "corporate social responsibility" actually irresponsible? These are just a few of the questions we'll answer during the semester, all while developing an understanding of what happens when politics meets economics.

PSC 241 Urban Change and City Politics

Gerald Gamm
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered rarely

Through intensive reading and discussion, we examine the politics and history of American cities. While we read scholarship drawing on the experiences of an array of cities--including Chicago, New York, Detroit, Boston, Oakland, Philadelphia, San Diego, Albuquerque, Phoenix, New Haven, Atlanta, Buffalo, and Charlotte--our emphasis is on commonalities in the urban experience as well as on systematic differences. We analyze the relationship of cities to their hinterlands in the early stages of urban development, the rise of ethnic neighborhoods, suburbanization, industrialization, de-industrialization, housing and jobs, concentrated poverty, and population changes. Race, ethnicity, and class are central to this course, not only in understanding changes in neighborhoods but also in the nature of politics and governmental arrangements. Students receiving writing credit turn in four brief papers as well as a research paper; other students write seven brief papers. There is no exam.

PSC/IR 256 Theories of Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course introduces theories in the field of comparative politics. We want to understand how the national and international environment, the political culture, the political institutions and the choices of citizens and leaders affect political performance. We explain democratization, stability, competition, citizen influence, and policy outcomes as consequences of the environment, culture and institutions--and human choices in these contexts. The theories of comparative politics offer such explanations. In this course we want to introduce some of the theories and evaluate their credibility, both through general readings and by seeing how they play out in some specific countries. We shall especially use politics in Germany to exemplify various theoretical features.

PSC/IR 261 Latin American Politics

Gretchen Helmke
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every 1-2 years

This course provides an introduction to political institutions and institutional reform in contemporary Latin America. The central theme of the course will be to focus on the emergence and functioning of key political institutions in Latin America, including the presidency, the legislature, the system of electoral rules, political parties, the judiciary, and the bureaucracy. The course will draw on a broad range of theoretical perspectives to analyze institutional choice and performance. In addition, the course will consider competing definitions of institutions, evaluate the trade-offs posed by institutional choice, and consider the prospects for institutional reform in the region.

PSC/IR 265 Civil War and the International System

Bethany Lacina
Fall 2012 — MW 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Addresses the question of when and where civil wars occur and what their effects are domestically and internationally. Also examine role played by external actors in civil war, such as financial support to governments or insurgents, armed interventions, and peacekeeping missions.

PSC/IR 270 Mechanisms of International Relations

Hein Goemans
Fall 2012 — R 15:25-18:05
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

The last ten years or so have seen a major revolution in the social sciences. Instead of trying to discover and test grand "covering laws" that have universal validity and tremendous scope (think Newton's gravity or Einstein's relativity), the social sciences are in the process of switching to more narrow and middle-range theories and explanations, often referred to as causal mechanisms. Mechanisms play a crucial role in this new conception of theory in the social sciences. In this course we will examine one particular mechanism each week and see how it has been applied in international political economy and/or security studies. Students will be introduced to formal reasoning in an informal manner. We will explore several substantive themes, such as the "democratic peace," ethnic conflict and international trade to illustrate the mechanisms and cumulative potential of this research approach.

PSC/IR 276 The Politics of Insurgency and Terrorism

Bethany Lacina
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This seminar examines the military, political, and social factors that determine how non-state actors can win conflicts against governments and the problems of recruitment, control, and targeting faced by rebel and terrorist groups. The grade in this class is based on attendance, participation, two group presentations, and writing assignments building toward a final, 20-page research paper.

PSC 280 Political Accountability

Stuart Jordan
Fall 2012 ("W" Required) — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics, Positive Theory
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This class surveys positive theories of political accountability - theories of the mechanisms that cause governments to act (or prevent them from acting) in the interests of their citizens. In the first few weeks students are trained to analyze basic principal-agent models. These models were initially developed in economics, and are now widely used in the studies of political accountability. The rest of the course is divided into two units - theories of political accountability in representative democracies, and theories of political accountability in autocracies. In addition to basic positive models, both units examine empirical studies of accountability, and problems of "reform" - i.e. the possibility of designing institutions that would improve accountability.

PSC 288 Game Theory

Paulo Barelli
Fall 2012 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

PSC 394 Local Law and Politics Internships

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional)
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

Most internship placements are in the District Attorney's or Public Defender's offices or in the local offices of U.S. members of Congress or Senators. Other internships are available depending on student interest. Interns work 10-12 hours per week through the entire semester. Grades are primarily based on a research paper. Applicants should have an appropriate course background for the internship and at least a B average. Students must be accepted in the course before approaching an agency for an internship. Applications are available from Professor L. Powell and an interest meeting is held just before preregistration each semester.

PSC 396 Washington Semester

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2012
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

These internships provide an opportunity to learn experientially one or more of the following: how government functions; how public policies are created, adopted and implemented; and how political campaigns work. Placements would typically be in Congress, the executive branch, party campaign committees, and possibly lobbying and advocacy groups. For applications and information, students should contact Professor L. Powell. An interest meeting is held each semester.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2012
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.

PSC 404 Probability and Inference

Kevin A. Clarke
Fall 2012 — TR 16:50-18:05
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

This course in mathematical statistics provides graduate students in political science with a solid foundation in probability and statistical inference. The focus of the course is on the empirical modeling of non-experimental data. While substantive political science will never be far from our minds, our primary goal is to acquire the tools necessary for success in the rest of the econometric sequence. As such, this course serves as a prerequisite for the advanced political science graduate courses in statistical methods (PSC 405, 505, and 506).

PSC 407 Mathematical Modeling

John Duggan
Fall 2012 — MW 10:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course is the first half of a two-course sequence consisting of PSC 407 and PSC 408. The goal of the sequence is to give a rigorous introduction to the main concepts and results in positive political theory. At the same time, we will teach you the mathematical tools necessary to understand these results, to use them and (if it suits you) to surpass them in your own research in political science. The course will emphasize rigorous logical and deductive reasoning - this skill will prove valuable, even to the student primarily interested in empirical analysis rather than modeling. The sequence is designed to be both a rigorous foundation for students planning on taking further courses in the positive political theory field and a self-contained overview of the field for students who do not intend to do additional coursework in the field. The sequence will cover both social choice theory, which concerns finding an axiomatic basis for collective decision making, and game theory, which analyzes individual behavior in strategic situations. Students should have, at a minimum, a sound familiarity with basic algebra (solving equations, graphing functions, etc.) and a knowledge of basic calculus. Consistent with department policy, students are required to attend the "math" camp offered in the weeks before the first fall semester.

PSC 504 Causal Inference

Matthew Blackwell
Fall 2012 — R 15:30-18:10
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

Substantive questions in empirical social science research are often causal. Does voter outreach increase turnout? Do political institutions affect economic development? Are job training programs effective? This class will introduce students to both the theory and the practice behind making these kinds of causal inferences. We will cover causal identification, potential outcomes, experiments, matching, regression, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables estimation, regression discontinuity designs, sensitivity analysis, dynamic causal inference, and more. The course will draw upon examples from political science, economics, sociology, public health, and public policy.

PSC 505 Maximum Likelihood Estimation

Curtis S. Signorino
Fall 2012 — TR 10:30-12:00
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

The classical linear regression model is inappropriate for many of the most interesting problems in political science. This course builds upon the analytical foundations of PSC 404 and 405, taking the latter's emphasis on the classical linear model as its point of departure. Here students will learn methods to analyze models and data for event counts, durations, censoring, truncation, selection, multinomial ordered/unordered categories, strategic choices, spatial voting models, and time series. A major goal of the course will be to teach students how to develop new models and techniques for analyzing issues they encounter in their own research.

PSC 513 Interest Groups

Lawrence Rothenberg
Fall 2012 — F 9:30-12:15
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered occasionally

This course principally introduces students to the political science and political economy literatures on interest groups, with a special focus on how these groups operate in the context of American politics (however, contrast with other advanced and the European Union are included). This will include developing an understanding of the makeup of the group system, the contribution decision, the internal politics of organizations, and the role that groups play with respect to formal political institutions.

PSC 558 Comparative Parties and Elections

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2012 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Typically offered every 2-3 years

How and why do political parties emerge? What are the causes and consequences of adopting different electoral rules? Under what conditions do voters behave strategically? This course examines the growing literature on parties, electoral systems, and voting in comparative politics. We consider multiple methodological approaches to these questions and explore the dynamics of voting, elections, and party competition in a range of empirical contexts.

PSC 575 Political Economy I

Staff
Fall 2012 — MW 10:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

The course takes up foundational topics in theoretical political economy. It begins with the analysis of fundamental concepts of preference and choice used throughout the course. The course then covers the main results in social choice theory, where collective decisions are viewed as the product of an abstract process of preference aggregation. Results covered include Arrow's impossibility theorem and Black's median voter theorem. The course then moves to the game-theoretic analysis of elections, voting, and legislative bargaining, with a special focus on connections to social choice theory. Content of the course may vary with the instructor.

PSC 578 International Conflict: Theory and History

Hein Goemans
Fall 2012 — W 15:45-18:30
Political Science Field: International Relations
Typically offered every other year

This is a course intended to provide graduate students with a survey of the history of international conflict, focusing on European and U.S. diplomatic history from 1763 to 1989.

PSC 581 Foundations of Political Theory

James Johnson
Fall 2012 — R 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered every year

This seminar addresses different topics in different years. This year (2012) the topic will be Democratic Theory. We will read a range of classic and contemporary works on a variety of topics. The primary focus will be on the role of democratic decision-making mechanisms in the design and re-design of political-economic institutions.

PSC 584 Game Theory

Tasos Kalandrakis
Fall 2012 — MW 14:00-15:30
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course is the third semester of the formal theory sequence for graduate students. It focuses on teaching students more sophisticated tools for modeling more complex games. Specifically, the course concentrates on games of incomplete information such as signaling games and communication games and develops analytical tools such as Bayesian-Nash equilibrium, perfect Bayesian equilibrium, and equilibrium refinements. The course also covers repeated games, bargaining games and equilibrium existence in a rigorous fashion. The prerequisites for the course are PSC 407 and 408, or an equivalent background in complete information game theory. Grading is based on homework assignments and a midterm and final exam.

International Relations

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2012 — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course will introduce students to comparative politics and the study of domestic political institutions, processes, and outcomes across and within countries. These important themes and concepts of contemporary comparative politics include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution and the power of ethnicity. Cases will be drawn from different countries and historical periods to give students a grounding in the method of comparative analysis. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science or international relations and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of developed and developing countries.

IR 204 Dictatorship and Democracy

Adam Cohon
Fall 2012 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered rarely

Francis Fukuyama over twenty years ago predicted that democracy was the final regime type, and that all countries would in time embrace it. In this course we examine where he was right, and where he was wrong. We first define democratic and authoritarian regime types, and the presence of both types and hybrid types across the world. We examine both democratic breakdown and democratic transitions, using cases from Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America since the Second World War. In studying democratic transitions, we also develop theories on why particular countries remain non-democratic. In the final section of the course, we examine the persistence of non-democratic regimes and the prospects for future democratic transitions, particularly in China and in the recent "Arab Spring." In each section, we will consider actor-based, structural, and institutional explanations for regime change.

IR 217 How Countries Become Rich

Adam Cohon
Fall 2012 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered rarely

IR 228 International Security


Fall 2012 ("W" Required) — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered rarely

If the post-Cold War period began with the promise of a New World Order and ended in the rubble of Falluja, today the United States faces a new era of conventional and unconventional challenges. This course examines current state and non-state challenges to U.S. interests. These include the perils of unipolarity, the rise of potential peer competitors, internal conflict and terrorism, nuclear proliferation, transnational crime, and cyberwar. Students will analyze cases as well as theoretical literatures to deepen their understanding of the contemporary security issues facing the United States.

IR 231 Counterinsurgency in Theory and Practice


Fall 2012
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered rarely

The United States and its allies are fighting an insurgency in Afghanistan, fought multiple insurgencies in Iraq, and are attempting to defeat insurgencies in Yemen, the Philippines and the Horn of Africa. What do these efforts consist of? How does counterinsurgency (COIN) work? How is it supposed to work? Why do policymakers expect the defeat of insurgencies abroad to make Americans safer at home? This course considers these questions through students’ analysis of relevant theoretical literatures, the COIN literature, and associated research into internal conflict and state-building, as well as through students’ study of current and recent COIN campaigns.

PSC/IR 256 Theories of Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course introduces theories in the field of comparative politics. We want to understand how the national and international environment, the political culture, the political institutions and the choices of citizens and leaders affect political performance. We explain democratization, stability, competition, citizen influence, and policy outcomes as consequences of the environment, culture and institutions--and human choices in these contexts. The theories of comparative politics offer such explanations. In this course we want to introduce some of the theories and evaluate their credibility, both through general readings and by seeing how they play out in some specific countries. We shall especially use politics in Germany to exemplify various theoretical features.

PSC/IR 261 Latin American Politics

Gretchen Helmke
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every 1-2 years

This course provides an introduction to political institutions and institutional reform in contemporary Latin America. The central theme of the course will be to focus on the emergence and functioning of key political institutions in Latin America, including the presidency, the legislature, the system of electoral rules, political parties, the judiciary, and the bureaucracy. The course will draw on a broad range of theoretical perspectives to analyze institutional choice and performance. In addition, the course will consider competing definitions of institutions, evaluate the trade-offs posed by institutional choice, and consider the prospects for institutional reform in the region.

PSC/IR 265 Civil War and the International System

Bethany Lacina
Fall 2012 — MW 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Addresses the question of when and where civil wars occur and what their effects are domestically and internationally. Also examine role played by external actors in civil war, such as financial support to governments or insurgents, armed interventions, and peacekeeping missions.

PSC/IR 270 Mechanisms of International Relations

Hein Goemans
Fall 2012 — R 15:25-18:05
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

The last ten years or so have seen a major revolution in the social sciences. Instead of trying to discover and test grand "covering laws" that have universal validity and tremendous scope (think Newton's gravity or Einstein's relativity), the social sciences are in the process of switching to more narrow and middle-range theories and explanations, often referred to as causal mechanisms. Mechanisms play a crucial role in this new conception of theory in the social sciences. In this course we will examine one particular mechanism each week and see how it has been applied in international political economy and/or security studies. Students will be introduced to formal reasoning in an informal manner. We will explore several substantive themes, such as the "democratic peace," ethnic conflict and international trade to illustrate the mechanisms and cumulative potential of this research approach.

PSC/IR 276 The Politics of Insurgency and Terrorism

Bethany Lacina
Fall 2012 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This seminar examines the military, political, and social factors that determine how non-state actors can win conflicts against governments and the problems of recruitment, control, and targeting faced by rebel and terrorist groups. The grade in this class is based on attendance, participation, two group presentations, and writing assignments building toward a final, 20-page research paper.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2012
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.