Courses — Fall 2013

For official course schedules, restrictions, classrooms, and current enrollments, check the Registrar's schedule.
More current syllabi and course information might be available for students on my.rochester.edu.

Political Science

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2013 — MWF 12:00-12:50
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course will introduce students to comparative politics and the study of domestic political institutions, processes, and outcomes across and within countries. These important themes and concepts of contemporary comparative politics include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution and the power of ethnicity. Cases will be drawn from different countries and historical periods to give students a grounding in the method of comparative analysis. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science or international relations and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of developed and developing countries.

PSC 105 Introduction to American Politics

Gerald Gamm
Fall 2013 — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: American Politics, Introductory Courses
Typically offered every year

When did some states turn blue--and others red--in presidential elections? What are the origins of the modern Congress, including the filibuster-prone Senate and a House run by its majority party? Why did politicians begin to campaign for the presidency, rather than waiting on their front porches for voters to appear? How did voting rights--and other rights of citizenship--expand, then narrow, then expand again, over time? Drawing broadly on historical as well as contemporary evidence, this course will introduce students to the foundations of American government. We will examine political institutions as well as the linkages that connect institutions, political leaders, and ordinary citizens. This course is appropriate for majors and non-majors with an interest in understanding how and why the American political system works as it does.

PSC 200 Applied Data Analysis

Matthew Blackwell
Fall 2013 — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

Data analysis has become a key part of many fields including politics, business, law, and public policy. This course covers the fundamentals of data analysis, giving students the necessary statistical skills to understand and critically analyze contemporary political, legal, and policy puzzles. Lectures will focus on the theory and practice of quantitative analysis and weekly lab sessions will guide students through the particulars of statistical software. No prior knowledge of statistics or data analysis is required.

PSC 203 Survey Research Methods

Michael Peress
Fall 2013 — MW 14:00-15:15
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

This course offers an introduction to the understanding of politics through data analysis, with particular emphasis on surveys of the mass public. We will study selecting a sample, designing and conducting a survey, interpreting the results of a survey, correcting for bias in a survey, and measuring the accuracy of a survey. This semester, we will pay special attention to the accuracy of public opinion polling preceding the 2008 primary and Presidential elections. PSC 203 satisfies the Techniques of Analysis requirement for undergraduate majors and minors in political science.

PSC 221 Philosophical Foundations of the American Revolution

Richard Dees
Fall 2013 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered every 2-3 years

In this course, we will examine the philosophical foundations of the American Revolution by examining the political theory which lies behind the revolution itself and which underlies the foundations of the Constitution, while keeping an eye at the historical contexts that shaped the philosophy. We will begin by looking at the important predecessors to the revolution, particularly the works of John Locke, Montesquieu, and David Hume. We will then consider important works from the period surrounding the revolution, including works by Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson. Finally, we will look at the debates surrounding the adoption of the U.S. Constitution, including the Federalist Papers and important anti-Federalist works.

PSC 222 U.S. Presidency

Stuart Jordan
Fall 2013 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course introduces the major topics and theoretical perspectives in the study of the U.S. presidency. Topics include: rationales for and effects of separation of powers; the presidency in comparative perspective; the nature and origin of the president's influence on policy; the president's role in lawmaking and the veto; presidential management of the executive branch; war powers and the president's role in national security.

PSC 223 Constitutional Structure and Rights

Thomas H. Jackson
Fall 2013 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

In this course, through the lens of the Constitution and Supreme Court cases, we examine the essential structure of the American legal system (both separation of powers at the federal level and the authority of, and relationship among, states and the federal government), as well as the essential nature of civil rights of citizens vis-a-vis the political order. Topics covered include the nature of the Supreme Court's authority; separation of powers; federal limits on state powers; and individual rights, including economic rights, certain of the rights embraced by the First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendments, and equal protection rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. The ability to read and discuss (as well as place in perspective and disagree with) Supreme Court opinions is an essential part of the course.

PSC 232 Controversies in Public Policy

Bruce Jacobs
Fall 2013 — MW 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

This course will consider a number of public policies over which there is much disagreement - mandating health insurance, the future of Social Security, how (or whether) to balance the federal budget, racial discrimination in employment, global warming, public financing of family planning, and the like. The purpose of the course is to arrive at an understanding of both sides of the issues so that they can discussed intelligently.

PSC 234 Law and Politics in the U.S.

Maya Sen
Fall 2013 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

How does the Supreme Court really decide cases? Are judges as activist as politicians claim? In this course, we will explore these questions by addressing how political and social forces influence American law and legal institutions, and vice versa. We'll divide the course into roughly two parts: (1) judicial politics and decision making and (2) law and its relation to the rest of society. Taking examples from the Civil Rights movement as well as from today's headlines, we'll develop a solid understanding of how the American legal system works, the basics of legal reasoning, and why judges are sometimes accused simply of being politicians.

PSC 236 Health Care and the Law

Margie Hodges Shaw
Fall 2013 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Typically offered every year

This course provides an introduction to the legal foundations of health care in America. It is the responsibility of the American government to promote and protect the health and welfare of the public while respecting the interests, and upholding the rights, of the individual. The content of this course addresses how the law balances these collective and individual rights. The material covers a broad range of legal issues in health care, including autonomy, privacy, liberty, and proprietary interests, from the perspective of the provider(s) and the patient.

PSC 238 Business and Politics

David Primo
Fall 2013 — TR 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

The focus of this course is the conflict and cooperation between business and government, with an emphasis on U.S. domestic politics. We will cover a broad range of issues affecting the business world, including regulation, lawmaking, the mass media, interest group activism, and crisis management. The course will connect ongoing political debates to theory, and guest speakers will bring their business and political experience to our class. Each meeting will feature a general topic, as well as in-depth analyses of real-world cases related to that topic. What happens when Wal-Mart tries to open a new store in a city with strong unions? Who is opposed to grocery stores selling wine, and why? How did General Motors fight back against a media report critical of its products? Is "corporate social responsibility" actually irresponsible? These are just a few of the questions we'll answer during the semester, all while developing an understanding of what happens when politics meets economics.

PSC 241 Urban Change and City Politics

Gerald Gamm
Fall 2013 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered rarely

Through intensive reading and discussion, we examine the politics and history of American cities. While we read scholarship drawing on the experiences of an array of cities--including Chicago, New York, Detroit, Boston, Oakland, Philadelphia, San Diego, Albuquerque, Phoenix, New Haven, Atlanta, Buffalo, and Charlotte--our emphasis is on commonalities in the urban experience as well as on systematic differences. We analyze the relationship of cities to their hinterlands in the early stages of urban development, the rise of ethnic neighborhoods, suburbanization, industrialization, de-industrialization, housing and jobs, concentrated poverty, and population changes. Race, ethnicity, and class are central to this course, not only in understanding changes in neighborhoods but also in the nature of politics and governmental arrangements.

PSC 245 Aging and Public Policy

Bruce Jacobs
Fall 2013 — MW 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

The course will cover policies in such areas as social security, public assistance, health care, and social services for the elderly. The factual and philosophical assumptions underlying each policy will be examined, as will the division of responsibilities between public and private institutions and individuals. A variety of books, articles, and official publications that bear on the issues covered will be assigned.

PSC 246 Environmental Law and Policy

Terry Noto
Fall 2013 — TR 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Typically offered rarely

An examination of federal environmental law and policy from a practical and historical perspective. This course will provide a basic foundational understanding of U.S. environmental law and help students develop the tools necessary to critique and improve environmental policy making. Topics include an overview of key federal environmental laws, some of the major loopholes, how environmental laws are shaped through agency regulation, judicial interpretation, political pressure, and their efficacy at safeguarding the environment and the public. The course will be taught through a combination of lectures, a group project focused on a specific case study, and student-led discussions about key aspects of environmental laws. Students will finish by considering emerging environmental issues and ways to address them.

PSC/IR 252 Ethnic Politics

Bethany Lacina
Fall 2013 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered

What motivates individuals to identify with an ethnic group? How does ethnic identity shape voting, political parties, democratic stability, economic growth, and political violence? This seminar explores the growing literature on ethnic politics in comparative politics and international relations. The course includes theoretical and multi-country studies of ethnic politics and also includes in-depth case studies of Nigeria, the United States, South Africa, India, and Sudan.

PSC/IR 253 Comparative Political Parties

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2013 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This seminar examines the nature of political parties and political competition across democracies in the developed and developing worlds. Issues analyzed include the formation of different types of parties, their role in agenda-setting, policy-making and representation, and their transformation in the post-World War II era.

PSC/IR 256 Theories of Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Fall 2013 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course introduces theories in the field of comparative politics. We want to understand how the national and international environment, the political culture, the political institutions and the choices of citizens and leaders affect political performance. We explain democratization, stability, competition, citizen influence, and policy outcomes as consequences of the environment, culture and institutions--and human choices in these contexts. The theories of comparative politics offer such explanations. In this course we want to introduce some of the theories and evaluate their credibility, both through general readings and by seeing how they play out in some specific countries. We shall especially use politics in Germany to exemplify various theoretical features.

PSC/IR 270 Mechanisms of International Relations

Hein Goemans
Fall 2013 — R 15:25-18:05
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

The last ten years or so have seen a major revolution in the social sciences. Instead of trying to discover and test grand "covering laws" that have universal validity and tremendous scope (think Newton's gravity or Einstein's relativity), the social sciences are in the process of switching to more narrow and middle-range theories and explanations, often referred to as causal mechanisms. Mechanisms play a crucial role in this new conception of theory in the social sciences. In this course we will examine one particular mechanism each week and see how it has been applied in international political economy and/or security studies. Students will be introduced to formal reasoning in an informal manner. We will explore several substantive themes, such as the "democratic peace," ethnic conflict and international trade to illustrate the mechanisms and cumulative potential of this research approach.

PSC/IR 279 War and the Nation State

Hein Goemans
Fall 2013 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course examines the development of warfare and the growth of the state from the French Revolution to the end of the Second World War. We examine the phenomenon of war in its broader socio-economic context, focusing on nationalism, bureaucratization, industrialization and democratization. We will go into some detail on the two major conflicts of the twentieth century, the First and Second World Wars. Students are required to do all the reading. Every student will make a presentation in class on the readings for one class (25% of the grade), and there will be one comprehensive final (75%).

PSC 283 Contemporary Political Theory

James Johnson
Fall 2013 — TR 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered every other year

This course deals with the role of vision and representation in current political thought. This is a broad theme. To explore it we will read a variety of critics and theorists such as John Dewey, Hannah Arendt, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Michel Foucault, and Susan Sontag. We also will explore efforts in a broad range of visual media such as graphics and photography, to envision such matters as race and color, migrations and boundaries, material inequality, power and its manifestations, and so forth. By analyzing these resources, students will develop their skills, both oral and written, at formulating their own arguments on important political themes. The course is writing intensive. It is not open to freshmen. Pre-requisite: PSC 202 Argument in Political Science.

PSC 287 Theories of Political Economy

James Johnson
Fall 2013 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy, Positive Theory
Typically offered

In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of several scholars who have won the Nobel Prize in economics. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

PSC 288 Game Theory

Paulo Barelli
Fall 2013 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

PSC 394 Local Law and Politics Internships

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2013
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

Most internship placements are in the District Attorney's or Public Defender's offices or in the local offices of U.S. members of Congress or Senators. Other internships are available depending on student interest. Interns work 10-12 hours per week through the entire semester. Grades are primarily based on a research paper. Applicants should have an appropriate course background for the internship and at least a B average. Students must be accepted in the course before approaching an agency for an internship. Applications are available from Professor L. Powell and an interest meeting is held just before preregistration each semester.

PSC 396 Washington Semester

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2013
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

These internships provide an opportunity to learn experientially one or more of the following: how government functions; how public policies are created, adopted and implemented; and how political campaigns work. Students intern in Congress, the executive branch, party campaign committees, and lobbying and advocacy groups. For applications and information, students should contact Professor L. Powell. An interest meeting is held each semester.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2013
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.

PSC 404 Probability and Inference

Kevin A. Clarke
Fall 2013 — TR 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

This course in mathematical statistics provides graduate students in political science with a solid foundation in probability and statistical inference. The focus of the course is on the empirical modeling of non-experimental data. While substantive political science will never be far from our minds, our primary goal is to acquire the tools necessary for success in the rest of the econometric sequence. As such, this course serves as a prerequisite for the advanced political science graduate courses in statistical methods (PSC 405, 505, and 506).

PSC 407 Mathematical Modeling

Mark Fey
Fall 2013 — MW 10:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course is the first half of a two-course sequence consisting of PSC 407 and PSC 408. The goal of the sequence is to give a rigorous introduction to the main concepts and results in positive political theory. At the same time, we will teach you the mathematical tools necessary to understand these results, to use them and (if it suits you) to surpass them in your own research in political science. The course will emphasize rigorous logical and deductive reasoning - this skill will prove valuable, even to the student primarily interested in empirical analysis rather than modeling. The sequence is designed to be both a rigorous foundation for students planning on taking further courses in the positive political theory field and a self-contained overview of the field for students who do not intend to do additional coursework in the field. The sequence will cover both social choice theory, which concerns finding an axiomatic basis for collective decision making, and game theory, which analyzes individual behavior in strategic situations. Students should have, at a minimum, a sound familiarity with basic algebra (solving equations, graphing functions, etc.) and a knowledge of basic calculus. Consistent with department policy, students are required to attend the "math" camp offered in the weeks before the first fall semester.

PSC 479 War and the Nation State

Hein Goemans
Fall 2013 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: International Relations
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course examines the development of warfare and the growth of the state from the French Revolution to the end of the Second World War. We examine the phenomenon of war in its broader socio-economic context, focusing on nationalism, bureaucratization, industrialization and democratization. We will go into some detail on the two major conflicts of the twentieth century, the First and Second World Wars. Students are required to do all the reading. Every student will make a presentation in class on the readings for one class (25% of the grade), and there will be one big final (75%).

PSC 487 Theories of Political Economy

James Johnson
Fall 2013 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered

In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of several scholars who have won the Nobel Prize in economics. Our aim is to explore the analytically, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

PSC 505 Maximum Likelihood Estimation

Curtis S. Signorino
Fall 2013 — TR 10:30-12:00
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

The classical linear regression model is inappropriate for many of the most interesting problems in political science. This course builds upon the analytical foundations of PSC 404 and 405, taking the latter's emphasis on the classical linear model as its point of departure. Here students will learn methods to analyze models and data for event counts, durations, censoring, truncation, selection, multinomial ordered/unordered categories, strategic choices, spatial voting models, and time series. A major goal of the course will be to teach students how to develop new models and techniques for analyzing issues they encounter in their own research.

PSC 523 American Politics Field Seminar

Michael Peress, Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2013 — T 12:30-15:15
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

This seminar will introduce you to classic as well as contemporary research in American politics. We will discuss the literature both in political institutions (e.g., Congress) and in political behavior (e.g., voting). By covering an array of topics in these areas, the course will provide a foundation for developing a comprehensive understanding of the field and the various directions in which it is now moving.

PSC 570 Civil Order and Civil Violence

Bethany Lacina
Fall 2013 — W 16:00-18:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
Typically offered every other year

The course will cover theoretical and empirical scholarship on how political order is maintained and how it breaks down. Four literatures will be covered: canonical theories of social order and change; the origins and nature of the state; revolution; and civil war. Evaluation will be based on class participation and multiple, short writing assignments over the course of the semester. Graduate students in political science may count this course toward the international relations or comparative politics subfield.

PSC 575 Political Economy I

John Duggan
Fall 2013 — MW 10:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

The course covers the primary results in preference aggregation and applies them to models of elections and policy-making. The focus of the course is especially on dynamic models of politics. We begin by studying Arrow's theorem and majority voting, we review the workhorse models of elections in the political economy literature, and we use these models to study taxation and inequality, interest groups and lobbying, etc. In the second part of the course, we extend the analysis to repeated elections and electoral accountability. We cover the literature on political agency with moral hazard and adverse selection. The course will consist of a mix of lectures, discussion, and student presentation of assigned readings.

PSC 584 Game Theory

Mark Fey
Fall 2013 — MW 14:00-15:30
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course is the third semester of the formal theory sequence for graduate students. It focuses on teaching students more sophisticated tools for modeling more complex games. Specifically, the course concentrates on games of incomplete information such as signaling games and communication games and develops analytical tools such as Bayesian-Nash equilibrium, perfect Bayesian equilibrium, and equilibrium refinements. The course also covers repeated games, bargaining games and equilibrium existence in a rigorous fashion. The prerequisites for the course are PSC 407 and 408, or an equivalent background in complete information game theory. Grading is based on homework assignments and a midterm and final exam.

PSC 585 Dynamic Models: Structure, Computation and Estimation

Tasos Kalandrakis
Fall 2013
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every other year

TR 14:00-15:15, F 10:00-12:00 Dynamic considerations are becoming increasingly important in the study of such political processes as legislative policy making, the impact of the political cycle on macroeconomic performance, the stability of international systems, the conduct of war, and regime change. The course develops the theory of dynamic models in decision and game theoretic environments, develops numerical methods for the computation of these models, and culminates with a thorough treatment of statistical estimation of dynamic models. The goal of the course is to equip graduate students with analytical, numerical, and statistical tools that can be used in their future research on applied topics, and specific applications will be considered at some length. Some familiarity with a programming language (such as Matlab or R) is a plus, but the dedicated student should be able to acquire basic programming skills needed for the course.

PSC 589 Social Choice, Bargaining and Elections

John Duggan
Fall 2013 — MW 10:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

The course covers the primary results in preference aggregation and applies them to models of elections and policy-making. The focus of the course is especially on dynamic models of politics. We begin by studying Arrow's theorem and majority voting, we review the workhorse models of elections in the political economy literature, and we use these models to study taxation and inequality, interest groups and lobbying, etc. In the second part of the course, we extend the analysis to repeated elections and electoral accountability. We cover the literature on political agency with moral hazard and adverse selection. The course will consist of a mix of lectures, discussion, and student presentation of assigned readings.

International Relations

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2013 — MWF 12:00-12:50
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course will introduce students to comparative politics and the study of domestic political institutions, processes, and outcomes across and within countries. These important themes and concepts of contemporary comparative politics include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution and the power of ethnicity. Cases will be drawn from different countries and historical periods to give students a grounding in the method of comparative analysis. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science or international relations and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of developed and developing countries.

IR 204 Dictatorship and Democracy

Adam Cohon
Fall 2013 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered rarely

Francis Fukuyama over twenty years ago predicted that democracy was the final regime type, and that all countries would in time embrace it. In this course we examine where he was right, and where he was wrong. We first define democratic and authoritarian regime types, and the presence of both types and hybrid types across the world. We examine both democratic breakdown and democratic transitions, using cases from Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America since the Second World War. In studying democratic transitions, we also develop theories on why particular countries remain non-democratic. In the final section of the course, we examine the persistence of non-democratic regimes and the prospects for future democratic transitions, particularly in China and in the recent "Arab Spring." In each section, we will consider actor-based, structural, and institutional explanations for regime change.

IR 229 International Political Economy

Youngchae Lee
Fall 2013 — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered rarely

Are developing countries systematically disadvantaged in the global economy? Are international institutions effective in dealing with contemporary global economic issues. Do multinational corporations have a positive impact on the host countries they invest in, or a negative one? This class is an introduction to international political economy (IPE), which examines the interaction between economics and politics (both domestic and international) in order to gain insight into the workings of global trade, finance, and investment.

IR 238 Political Economy of International Migration

Milena Novy-Marx
Fall 2013 ("W" Optional) — M 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course explores trends in international migration, examining the major waves of global migration over the last century, focusing especially on the last decade. It examines the push and pull factors that drive movements of people, the policies for addressing these movements, and the politics and other factors that help shape the migration policies of high and low income countries. We will consider both forced and voluntary migration. We will also examine recent literature that explores the relationship between migration and economic development, including remittances, diaspora, and evidence for the impact of migrants on institutions. The final part of the course covers nascent forms of global governance to address international flows of people.

PSC/IR 252 Ethnic Politics

Bethany Lacina
Fall 2013 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered

What motivates individuals to identify with an ethnic group? How does ethnic identity shape voting, political parties, democratic stability, economic growth, and political violence? This seminar explores the growing literature on ethnic politics in comparative politics and international relations. The course includes theoretical and multi-country studies of ethnic politics and also includes in-depth case studies of Nigeria, the United States, South Africa, India, and Sudan.

PSC/IR 253 Comparative Political Parties

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2013 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This seminar examines the nature of political parties and political competition across democracies in the developed and developing worlds. Issues analyzed include the formation of different types of parties, their role in agenda-setting, policy-making and representation, and their transformation in the post-World War II era.

PSC/IR 256 Theories of Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Fall 2013 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course introduces theories in the field of comparative politics. We want to understand how the national and international environment, the political culture, the political institutions and the choices of citizens and leaders affect political performance. We explain democratization, stability, competition, citizen influence, and policy outcomes as consequences of the environment, culture and institutions--and human choices in these contexts. The theories of comparative politics offer such explanations. In this course we want to introduce some of the theories and evaluate their credibility, both through general readings and by seeing how they play out in some specific countries. We shall especially use politics in Germany to exemplify various theoretical features.

PSC/IR 270 Mechanisms of International Relations

Hein Goemans
Fall 2013 — R 15:25-18:05
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

The last ten years or so have seen a major revolution in the social sciences. Instead of trying to discover and test grand "covering laws" that have universal validity and tremendous scope (think Newton's gravity or Einstein's relativity), the social sciences are in the process of switching to more narrow and middle-range theories and explanations, often referred to as causal mechanisms. Mechanisms play a crucial role in this new conception of theory in the social sciences. In this course we will examine one particular mechanism each week and see how it has been applied in international political economy and/or security studies. Students will be introduced to formal reasoning in an informal manner. We will explore several substantive themes, such as the "democratic peace," ethnic conflict and international trade to illustrate the mechanisms and cumulative potential of this research approach.

PSC/IR 279 War and the Nation State

Hein Goemans
Fall 2013 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course examines the development of warfare and the growth of the state from the French Revolution to the end of the Second World War. We examine the phenomenon of war in its broader socio-economic context, focusing on nationalism, bureaucratization, industrialization and democratization. We will go into some detail on the two major conflicts of the twentieth century, the First and Second World Wars. Students are required to do all the reading. Every student will make a presentation in class on the readings for one class (25% of the grade), and there will be one comprehensive final (75%).

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2013
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.