Courses — Spring 2014

For official course schedules, restrictions, classrooms, and current enrollments, check the Registrar's schedule.
More current syllabi and course information might be available for students on my.rochester.edu.

Political Science

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Spring 2014 — MWF 10:00-10:50
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Restriction: Open to freshman only. This course is an introduction to the study of political science and comparative politics. It focuses on how citizens may be able to control public policies in different modern democracies. The course begins by applying some of these ideas briefly to the American political system. It then turns explicitly to the politics of contemporary Britain, Russia and Germany, examining the political culture, the basic institutional arrangements, the party system, the voters' choices, and the policymaking system in each country. These systems will be compared to each other, to the United States and, occasionally, to other democracies. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science, or international relations, and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of democracies.

PSC/IR 106 Introduction to International Relations

Hein Goemans
Spring 2014 — MWF 12:00-12:50
Political Science Field: International Relations, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

This course provides students with the background and conceptual tools they need to understand contemporary international relations. The course will introduce students to the wide range of issues that make up the study of international relations, including the workings of the state system, the causes of international conflict and violence, and international economic relations. Students will be introduced to the literature in a broad way, to make them familiar with the main theoretical traditions in the field. Students will be asked, as much as possible, to read original texts, rather than a textbook. Time permitting, we will also examine topics of particular current interest, such as the evolving nature of power in the post-Cold War environment as well as special global challenges like nation-building and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

PSC 200 Applied Data Analysis

Curtis S. Signorino
Spring 2014 — MWF 11:00-11:50
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

How do we evaluate empirically the claims politicians make? How do we determine whether theories of political behavior are supported by evidence? In this course, students are introduced to data analysis, statistical inference, and research design, with a focus on techniques that are appropriate for political science data. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, correlation, and regression analysis. Students will be expected to participate in weekly lab sessions.

PSC 200 Applied Data Analysis

Kevin A. Clarke
Spring 2014 — MWF 13:00-13:50
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

Data analysis has become a key part of many fields including politics, business, law, and public policy. This course covers the fundamentals of data analysis, giving students the necessary statistical skills to understand and critically analyze contemporary political, legal, and policy puzzles. Lectures will focus on the theory and practice of quantitative analysis and weekly lab sessions will guide students through the particulars of statistical software. No prior knowledge of statistics or data analysis is required.

PSC 202 Argument in Political Science

Stuart Jordan
Spring 2014 — TR 14:00-15:15
Political Science Field: Required Course
Typically offered every year

Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course examines the politics of regulation, law, and legal institutions. Specifically, we look at a series of arguments regarding the role political institutions play in the resolution of conflicts over limited resources. The arguments we examine come from a range of traditions--including political philosophy, positive political theory, and political history. Finally, although we examine a number of applications to American politics, most of what we read regards conflicts over resources in general, not just those that occur within the United States.

PSC 208 Undergraduate Research Seminar

Matthew Blackwell
Spring 2014 ("W" Required) — R 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Individual Research
Typically offered every year

Through reading and critiquing political science research in American politics, comparative politics, and international relations, students learn how to select a research question, formulate testable hypotheses, find and evaluate relevant literature, locate or collect data that addresses their research question, analyze the data, and write a research report. The primary task for the semester is to complete a research paper on a topic the student chooses jointly with the instructor. Students work on individual or joint projects. The course is not a prerequisite for writing a senior honors thesis, though it is good preparation for doing so. With that in mind, near the end of the semester, juniors who are interested in doing an honors project during the senior year will be assisted in their efforts to identify a faculty member with whom they can work and in formulating a plan to carry out the thesis during the ensuing year.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors (and outstanding sophomores). Past or concurrent enrollment in a techniques of analysis course (PSC 200, 201, 203, 205, ECO 230 231, or the equivalent).

PSC 212 Supreme Court in U.S. History

Joel Seligman
Spring 2014 — M 16:50-19:30
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

This seminar will study leading constitutional law cases decided by the United States Supreme Court and their impact on the evolution of the Court, the balance of powers among our three governmental branches, relations between the federal government and the states, and individual express and implied rights. The seminar is intended to introduce students to legal reasoning and will make use of casebook and teaching methods typical of law schools.

PSC 213 The U.S. Congress

Michael Peress
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

This course offers an overview of the legislative branch of the United States government. We will discuss the electoral process, the nature of representation, legislative organization, the committee system, floor procedure, congressional parties, and inter-branch relations. We will examine theories of lawmaking and the impact of institutional and electoral rules on legislative behavior and outcomes.

PSC 215 American Elections

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2014 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This semester, special attention will be paid to the upcoming congressional elections. Campaign finance reform is also a timely topic. We will examine the role of money in elections and strategies for regulating its use. Other issues of current concern will include party polarization and gridlock in Congress, and the recently completed redistricting process for US House elections.

PSC 228 Race and Ethnic Politics

Maya Sen
Spring 2014 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

In this course, we will examine the key role played by race and ethnicity across various facets of American political life. We will explore the distinct political and social identities of African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and others, and how these identities translate into contrasting political beliefs and different political actions. Other topics include the interaction between race and ethnicity and employment, health policy, access to criminal justice, and educational inequalities. Readings will draw upon political science, law, economics, sociology, and public health.

PSC 235 Organizational Behavior

Bruce Jacobs
Spring 2014 — MW 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

An analysis of the politics and economics of how organizations work. The goal of the course is to provide an understanding of bureaucracies, private sector firms, and non-profit organizations with respect to how decisions are made.

PSC 237 Domestic Social Policy

Bruce Jacobs
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — MW 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

An examination of major policy issues at the federal level. The normative justifications for governmental actions are discussed as well as the limitations imposed by bureaucracy and the decision-making process. Governmental programs that affect the poor are examined in detail, with special attention paid to an assessment of their impact and alternatives now under consideration.

PSC 240 Criminal Procedure and Constitutional Principles

Edward L. Fiandach
Spring 2014 — MW 16:50-18:05
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Typically offered every year

Through analysis of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, we examine criminal procedure as elaborated by federal and state court decisions. Topics include arrest procedures, search and seizure, right to counsel, and police interrogation and confessions. We will discuss the theoretical principles of criminal procedure and the application of those principles to the actual operation of the criminal court system.

PSC 243 Environmental Politics

Lawrence Rothenberg
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

An examination of environmental issues from a social scientific perspective. Topics covered include the reasons for environmental regulation, the history of environmental policy, the state of contemporary environmental policy, the role of state and local governments, the impact of environmental activists, and a comparison of domestic and international regulation of environmental affairs. Although there is considerable time devoted to lecture, students are encouraged to participate. Each student will also develop and briefly present a research paper which investigates a relevant issue of interest.

PSC/IR 260 Contemporary African Politics

Robin Harding
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course provides an introduction to the major issues in contemporary African politics. The questions we will consider include: What are the legacies of slavery and colonialism? What accounts for the variation in political institutions across Africa? Why have so many African countries experienced political violence? And, how do political institutions influence development in Africa? We will do so by examining individual countries, as well as evidence from broad cross-national studies.

PSC/IR 262 Elections in Developing Countries

Robin Harding
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — M 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

How do elections work in developing countries? Do contexts that are specific to countries in the developing world have implications for the nature and operation of electoral politics therein? In this course we will explore a number of issues that have particular relevance for elections in developing countries, including clientelism and vote-buying, electoral manipulation and fraud, ethnic voting, and electoral violence. In addition, we will consider how limited levels of information and political credibility affect both the operation of electoral accountability and the nature of electoral competition. In doing so, we will draw on examples from Africa, Latin America, and South East Asia.

PSC/IR 265 Civil War and the International System

William Spaniel
Spring 2014 — TR 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Civil wars are now the most common form of armed combat in the world. However, as recent American forays in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya have illustrated, civil wars are rarely fought in isolation. Each side looks to foreign actors for military support or outright intervention. Meanwhile, international organizations like the United Nations mediate conflicts and initiate peacekeeping missions. As such, this course analyzes how the international system interacts with civil conflict.

PSC/IR 266 South Asian Politics

Avidit Acharya
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every other year

South Asia has more than 1.7 billion inhabitants, and is one of the most ethnically diverse regions of the world. This course explores the regional politics of South Asia, focusing on the domestic politics of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and Bangladesh. We will also discuss the relations of each of these countries with their neighbors and the rest of the world. The course will begin with a discussion of colonial legacies, and the paths of economic and political development in the post-colonial era. We will end with an in-depth study of contemporary political regimes in South Asia, party politics, and the religious and ethnic tensions that continue to plague the subcontinent in modern times.

PSC/IR 268 International Organization

Randall Stone
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered every other year

The anarchic society of international relations includes elements of order, including norms, international law and international organizations (IOs). Governance does not necessarily imply government. Indeed, most issues of wide concern in international affairs are governed by international treaties and presided over by international organizations. Some of these, such as the IMF, World Bank, WTO, UN, and EU, command substantial resources and reach deep into the domestic politics in their member states. The course will survey the history of international organization, analyze the most important IOs, and investigate the influence of law under anarchy. How effective are these elements of cooperation, and what problems are most difficult to solve at the international level? What leads to change in international governance? Students taking the course for writing credit register for 268W and write a substantial research paper in addition to the other course requirements.

PSC 281 Formal Models in Political Science

Ugur Ozdemir
Spring 2014 — TR 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

The purpose of this course is to introduce positive political theory, i.e., the use of mathematical models in the study of politics. There are two main sources for these models: game theory and social choice theory. In general, the former provides models for interactions among strategic players whereas the latter provides a theoretical framework for the normative/axiomatic analysis of aggregating individual preferences. We will survey a broad range of models which are applicable to many aspects of political science ranging from voting, electoral systems, legislative politics, collective action and institutions to the strategic role of international organizations and the situations of international crisis bargaining. There are no formal technical prerequisites for the course but some familiarity with mathematical reasoning is certainly helpful.

PSC 288 Game Theory

Tasos Kalandrakis
Spring 2014 — MW 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

Game theory, despite its frivolous-sounding name, gives us a unified approach to understanding social phenomena. It helps us understand not just the way people play games in the usual sense, like tic-tac-toe, chess or poker, but the way they behave in complex social situations as well. Examples of situations to which we will apply the theory include (but are not limited to): arms races, provision of public goods, competition between firms, electoral campaigns, voting, auctions, and bargaining. While there are no formal prerequisites, aptitude for logical or mathematical reasoning is desirable.

PSC/IR 289 The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective

Joseph E. Inikori
Spring 2014 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered rarely

The debate on the role of the state versus that of the free market in the socioeconomic process is as old as the history of political economy. We discuss what economists, political scientists, & economic historians characterize as the Washington consensus versus the Beijing consensus or the Asian model. This is followed by a discussion of the contributions of some notable thinkers - Adam Smith, Alexander Hamilton, Friedrich List, John Maynard Keynes, & Friedrich von Hayek. The greater part of the course deals with selected historical cases across the globe. The discussions are informed by a political economy conceptual framework, which helps to explain the politics and economics of state policy and the long-run historical processes that created the political & economic conditions. Students' performance is based on three short essays (four typed pages each) presented to the class for discussion and thereafter revised for grading. No mid-term & final examinations

PSC 291 First Amendment and Religion

Thomas H. Jackson
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics, Political Philosophy
Typically offered every year

The Constitution helps define, as it perhaps reflects, American society. In this scheme, religion has a special role. It, arguably uniquely, is given both Constitutional protection (free exercise) as well as Constitutional limitation (no establishment). Religion's placement in the Bill of Rights (as a part of the First Amendment) suggests its importance (both in protection and in limitation) to the founders, and religion's role in society today remains important and controversial. This course examines the historical forces that led to the adoption of the religion clauses of the First Amendment, the subsequent development of those clauses (importantly through the close reading of key Supreme Court opinions), and religion's role in modern American society.

PSC/IR 373 Territory and Group Conflict

Hein Goemans
Spring 2014 — M 16:40-19:10
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This graduate seminar examines a long neglected topic: the role of territory in group politics. The goal is to build a basic understanding of why, when, how and which territory becomes contested. We will read from a broad range of disciplines. Each student is expected to write two short papers for two different sessions, which are not to exceed 1500 words. Each paper should provide an independent commentary of you own on some aspect of that week's readings. These papers form the background against which we will discuss the readings in class. In addition, each student is required to write a 20-25 page research paper, which focuses in depth on one of the discussed emerging research agendas. As in other graduate seminars, the course will be conducted almost exclusively through discussion. Hence it is crucial that students do the reading in advance, to set aside time to reflect on the readings, and to prepare comments and questions.

PSC 380 Scope of Political Science

James Johnson
Spring 2014 — M 16:50-19:30
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered every year

The aim of the seminar is to encourage students to examine political science in a reflective, disciplined, critical way. It is primarily designed for entering Ph.D. students, but may be appropriate for undergraduate seniors considering graduate work in political science. We use basic concepts in the philosophy of science to explore a range of specific examples of research in the discipline with the aim of discerning more clearly what it means to say that social and political inquiry is scientific.

PSC 394 Local Law and Politics Internships

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional)
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

Most internship placements are in the District Attorney's or Public Defender's offices or in the local offices of U.S. members of Congress or Senators. Other internships are available depending on student interest. Interns work 10-12 hours per week through the entire semester. Grades are primarily based on a research paper. Applicants should have an appropriate course background for the internship and at least a B average. Students must be accepted in the course before approaching an agency for an internship. Applications are available from Professor L. Powell and an interest meeting is held just before preregistration each semester.

PSC 396 Washington Semester

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2014
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

These internships provide an opportunity to learn experientially one or more of the following: how government functions; how public policies are created, adopted and implemented; and how political campaigns work. Students intern in Congress, the executive branch, party campaign committees, and lobbying and advocacy groups. For applications and information, students should contact Professor L. Powell. An interest meeting is held each semester.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2014
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.

PSC 405 Linear Models

Michael Peress
Spring 2014 — TR 13:30-14:45
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

In this course, we will examine the linear regression model and its variants. The course has two goals: (1) to provide students with the statistical theory of the linear model, and (2) to provide students with skills for analyzing data. The linear model is a natural starting point for understanding regression models in general, inferences based on them, and problems with our inferences due to data issues or to model misspecification. The model's relative tractability has made it an attractive tool for political scientists, resulting in volumes of research using the methods studied here. Familiarity with the linear model is now essentially required if one wants to be a consumer or producer of modern political science research.

PSC 408 Positive Political Theory

Tasos Kalandrakis
Spring 2014 — MW 10:30-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course is part of a rigorous introduction to the main concepts and results in positive political theory. It is the second half of a two-course sequence consisting of PSC 407 and PSC 408. This course will focus on the basics of game theory, which analyzes individual behavior in strategic situations. It will also cover the mathematical tools required to express the theory. Examples and applications will be drawn from several different areas in political science, including the American Congress, voting, international relations, political economy, and law.

PSC 480 Scope of Political Science

James Johnson
Spring 2014 — M 16:50-19:30
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered every year

The aim of the seminar is to encourage students to examine political science in a reflective, disciplined, critical way. It is primarily designed for entering Ph.D. students, but may be appropriate for undergraduate seniors considering graduate work in political science. We use basic concepts in the philosophy of science to explore a range of specific examples of research in the discipline with the aim of discerning more clearly what it means to say that social and political inquiry is scientific.

PSC 502 Political and Economic Networks

Avidit Acharya, Matthew Blackwell
Spring 2014 — W 9:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

Social networks pervade political and economic life. They shape how we acquire political knowledge, how we discover job opportunities, and how we shape and maintain norms. The multitude of ways that networks affect the world make it critical to understand how network structures impact behavior, which network structures are likely to emerge, and why we organize ourselves as we do. Drawing on a wide variety of fields, this course will review the literature, both theoretical and empirical, on social, economic, and political networks. Topics will include basic network structures, network formation, games on networks, learning, diffusion, and methods for network analysis.

PSC 506 Advanced Topics in Methods

Kevin A. Clarke
Spring 2014 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every other year

This course is designed for graduate students intending to pursue political methodology as a major field. It covers advanced statistical methods that are not yet standard fare in political methodology courses: e.g., semiparametric methods, nonparametric regression, time-series econometrics, Bayesian methods, and ideal point estimation. Course content will vary year to year, and this semester will focus more heavily on Bayesian methods, simulation-based estimation, and ideal point estimation. As a research workshop, this course also allows students to pursue areas of individual interest in more depth, and therefore course content is determined based on the interests of both the professor and the students. Prerequisites: PSC 404, PSC 405, and PSC 505.

PSC 536 Corporate Political Strategy

David Primo
Spring 2014 — M 12:30-15:15
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

Description: This multidisciplinary Ph.D. course will study the role of corporations in the political process. Topics will include integrated strategy, political risk, the returns to political activity, and corporate social responsibility. Readings will be drawn from the management, economics, finance, and political science literatures. In this course, students will develop a deeper understanding of the interplay between business and government, consider the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach for studying this subject, and explore future directions for research.

PSC 545 Judicial Politics

Maya Sen
Spring 2014 — R 15:25-18:05
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

How do judges decide cases? Are judges more similar to other political actors than we might think? This course will address these questions by exploring contemporary political science scholarship on the U.S. courts. The class will cover the importance and measurement of judicial ideology, the role of ascriptive and professional characteristics of judges, strategic opinion assignment and writing, and the relationship of higher and lower courts. At the end of the course, students will be familiar with all major research areas within the field of judicial politics and will be able to undertake their own original research in the field.

PSC 550 Comparative Politics Field Seminar

Gretchen Helmke, G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Spring 2014 — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Typically offered every other year

This course provides general conceptual background and an introduction to some major works in the comparative field and subfields. Comparative politics is a field that attempts to develop and test theories that can be used to explain political events and patterns across political systems, especially nation-states. Topics include political culture, development and democratization, political regimes, violence and revolution, elections, social movements, parties, coalitions, institutions, and comparative public policy. The works are discussed and compared both in terms of the major substantive arguments and the methodological approaches taken to enhance the credibility of the arguments. The reading load is heavy and students are expected to write a number of short papers, which are presented in class, as well a midterm and one longer analytic essay.

PSC 568 International Organization

Randall Stone
Spring 2014 — F 9:30-12:00
Political Science Field: International Relations
Typically offered every other year

This is an advanced course intended for Ph.D. students. The course surveys theories of international organization, the development of formal and informal international institutions, and important recent contributions to research in the field. Course requirements include a research paper and a final exam.

PSC 573 Territory and Group Conflict

Hein Goemans
Spring 2014 — M 16:40-19:10
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This graduate seminar examines a long neglected topic: the role of territory in group politics. The goal is to build a basic understanding of why, when, how and which territory becomes contested. We will read from a broad range of disciplines. Each student is expected to write two short papers for two different sessions, which are not to exceed 1500 words. Each paper should provide an independent commentary of you own on some aspect of that week's readings. These papers form the background against which we will discuss the readings in class. In addition, each student is required to write a 20-25 page research paper, which focuses in depth on one of the discussed emerging research agendas. As in other graduate seminars, the course will be conducted almost exclusively through discussion. Hence it is crucial that students do the reading in advance, to set aside time to reflect on the readings, and to prepare comments and questions.

PSC 577 Theories of Conflict

Mark Fey
Spring 2014 — R 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: International Relations
Typically offered every other year

This course examines the literature on conflict that has developed in the last decade. We will examine recent formal literature as well as the latest substantive (non-formal) literature on conflict. The course will help graduate students identify the broad direction of international conflict studies and will also permit graduate students to pursue topics or ideas of their own interest. To that end, we set aside two classes for "model building sessions" where students can explore approaches to formalize some of the ideas in the substantive literature, or explore extensions of the current formal literature. Students should have taken or be concurrently taking PSC 584 or have an equivalent knowledge of complete and incomplete information game theory.

PSC 582 Political Economy II

Avidit Acharya, Matthew Blackwell
Spring 2014 — W 9:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

Social networks pervade political and economic life. They shape how we acquire political knowledge, how we discover job opportunities, and how we shape and maintain norms. The multitude of ways that networks affect the world make it critical to understand how network structures impact behavior, which network structures are likely to emerge, and why we organize ourselves as we do. Drawing on a wide variety of fields, this course will review the literature, both theoretical and empirical, on social, economic, and political networks. Topics will include basic network structures, network formation, games on networks, learning, diffusion, and methods for network analysis.

International Relations

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Spring 2014 — MWF 10:00-10:50
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Restriction: Open to freshman only. This course is an introduction to the study of political science and comparative politics. It focuses on how citizens may be able to control public policies in different modern democracies. The course begins by applying some of these ideas briefly to the American political system. It then turns explicitly to the politics of contemporary Britain, Russia and Germany, examining the political culture, the basic institutional arrangements, the party system, the voters' choices, and the policymaking system in each country. These systems will be compared to each other, to the United States and, occasionally, to other democracies. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science, or international relations, and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of democracies.

PSC/IR 106 Introduction to International Relations

Hein Goemans
Spring 2014 — MWF 12:00-12:50
Political Science Field: International Relations, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

This course provides students with the background and conceptual tools they need to understand contemporary international relations. The course will introduce students to the wide range of issues that make up the study of international relations, including the workings of the state system, the causes of international conflict and violence, and international economic relations. Students will be introduced to the literature in a broad way, to make them familiar with the main theoretical traditions in the field. Students will be asked, as much as possible, to read original texts, rather than a textbook. Time permitting, we will also examine topics of particular current interest, such as the evolving nature of power in the post-Cold War environment as well as special global challenges like nation-building and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

IR 220 Elections, Parties and Coalitions in Comparative Perspective

Paulina Marek
Spring 2014 — TR 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered

This course will focus on party competition and government formation in parliamentary democracies in Western and Central Europe. It will aim to explain voters' choices, party strategies, and origins of governments. It will take a look at elections from the perspective of both parties and voters, and analyze both the pre-election and post-election stages of party competition. The course will explore theories of voting, party systems, and party competition. It will also study pre-election alliances that are formed by parties in order to improve their electoral results as well as their chances to control the government after election. The course will conclude with the analysis of theories of government formation. Throughout the course, the analyzed theories will be used to explain cases of elections and government formation from Central and Western Europe.

IR 222 Politics of New Europe

Paulina Marek
Spring 2014 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered

This course will focus on countries that joined the European Union in 2004 and 2007 (Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, the Baltic States, Bulgaria and Romania). We will begin with a brief survey of the political history of the region and the establishment and sustenance of Communist rule in the Eastern Bloc, and proceed to analyze events that led to the transformation. The course will focus on the political and economic transformation in the region and the path to membership in the European Union. We will compare new EU members with the countries of Western Europe. We will conclude with a survey of the current situation in the countries of "New Europe" and their relations with "Old Europe" and other countries.

(This course is identical to PSC 169, offered in Summer 2012. Students may not take IR 222 for credit if they have previously received credit for PSC 169.)

IR 236 Contentious Politics and Social Movements

Adam Cohon
Spring 2014 — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered rarely

From the salons of Rochester to the shipyards of Gdansk to streets of Cairo, ordinary people have joined together to act outside of regular political institutions and push for change. They have formed organizations to protest, used nonviolence and violence, and fought to keep movements alive. These movements persist despite great personal risk and costs for participants. In this course we examine why and how social movements begin, organize, and succeed or fail. We examine how leaders develop new protest techniques, and how elites try to counter or neutralize these activities. Finally, we explore the impact of protest on macro-level outcomes such as political liberalization, new conceptions of citizenship and public policy. The course ends with a study of contemporary pro-democracy protests in the Middle East, considering hypotheses on the new use of social media. Throughout the semester, students will apply course theories to social movement organizations of their choice in independent research projects. Note: The course is a seminar capped at 20 students. Students will be expected to participate actively in class and complete three short research papers over the course of the semester.

IR 239 Women, Gender and Development

Milena Novy-Marx
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — M 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered every two to three years

This course examines a range of issues in international development from a gender perspective, with a particular focus on women and girls. Students will review recent literature on gender and development, including how development policies, programs and issues affect men and women, and girls and boys, differently. The course also covers recent trends in economic growth and development across low, middle and high-income countries. Students will have the opportunity to examine development issues, policies, and programs that address poverty and development in a range of sectors including health, education, agriculture, microfinance, and the environment. The major student work project will be to examine a development project or program in one particular country or community and assess its impact, including a gender perspective.

PSC/IR 260 Contemporary African Politics

Robin Harding
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course provides an introduction to the major issues in contemporary African politics. The questions we will consider include: What are the legacies of slavery and colonialism? What accounts for the variation in political institutions across Africa? Why have so many African countries experienced political violence? And, how do political institutions influence development in Africa? We will do so by examining individual countries, as well as evidence from broad cross-national studies.

PSC/IR 262 Elections in Developing Countries

Robin Harding
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — M 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

How do elections work in developing countries? Do contexts that are specific to countries in the developing world have implications for the nature and operation of electoral politics therein? In this course we will explore a number of issues that have particular relevance for elections in developing countries, including clientelism and vote-buying, electoral manipulation and fraud, ethnic voting, and electoral violence. In addition, we will consider how limited levels of information and political credibility affect both the operation of electoral accountability and the nature of electoral competition. In doing so, we will draw on examples from Africa, Latin America, and South East Asia.

PSC/IR 265 Civil War and the International System

William Spaniel
Spring 2014 — TR 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Civil wars are now the most common form of armed combat in the world. However, as recent American forays in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya have illustrated, civil wars are rarely fought in isolation. Each side looks to foreign actors for military support or outright intervention. Meanwhile, international organizations like the United Nations mediate conflicts and initiate peacekeeping missions. As such, this course analyzes how the international system interacts with civil conflict.

PSC/IR 266 South Asian Politics

Avidit Acharya
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every other year

South Asia has more than 1.7 billion inhabitants, and is one of the most ethnically diverse regions of the world. This course explores the regional politics of South Asia, focusing on the domestic politics of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and Bangladesh. We will also discuss the relations of each of these countries with their neighbors and the rest of the world. The course will begin with a discussion of colonial legacies, and the paths of economic and political development in the post-colonial era. We will end with an in-depth study of contemporary political regimes in South Asia, party politics, and the religious and ethnic tensions that continue to plague the subcontinent in modern times.

PSC/IR 268 International Organization

Randall Stone
Spring 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered every other year

The anarchic society of international relations includes elements of order, including norms, international law and international organizations (IOs). Governance does not necessarily imply government. Indeed, most issues of wide concern in international affairs are governed by international treaties and presided over by international organizations. Some of these, such as the IMF, World Bank, WTO, UN, and EU, command substantial resources and reach deep into the domestic politics in their member states. The course will survey the history of international organization, analyze the most important IOs, and investigate the influence of law under anarchy. How effective are these elements of cooperation, and what problems are most difficult to solve at the international level? What leads to change in international governance? Students taking the course for writing credit register for 268W and write a substantial research paper in addition to the other course requirements.

PSC/IR 289 The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective

Joseph E. Inikori
Spring 2014 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered rarely

The debate on the role of the state versus that of the free market in the socioeconomic process is as old as the history of political economy. We discuss what economists, political scientists, & economic historians characterize as the Washington consensus versus the Beijing consensus or the Asian model. This is followed by a discussion of the contributions of some notable thinkers - Adam Smith, Alexander Hamilton, Friedrich List, John Maynard Keynes, & Friedrich von Hayek. The greater part of the course deals with selected historical cases across the globe. The discussions are informed by a political economy conceptual framework, which helps to explain the politics and economics of state policy and the long-run historical processes that created the political & economic conditions. Students' performance is based on three short essays (four typed pages each) presented to the class for discussion and thereafter revised for grading. No mid-term & final examinations

PSC/IR 373 Territory and Group Conflict

Hein Goemans
Spring 2014 — M 16:40-19:10
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This graduate seminar examines a long neglected topic: the role of territory in group politics. The goal is to build a basic understanding of why, when, how and which territory becomes contested. We will read from a broad range of disciplines. Each student is expected to write two short papers for two different sessions, which are not to exceed 1500 words. Each paper should provide an independent commentary of you own on some aspect of that week's readings. These papers form the background against which we will discuss the readings in class. In addition, each student is required to write a 20-25 page research paper, which focuses in depth on one of the discussed emerging research agendas. As in other graduate seminars, the course will be conducted almost exclusively through discussion. Hence it is crucial that students do the reading in advance, to set aside time to reflect on the readings, and to prepare comments and questions.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2014
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.