Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony

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Recognizing Women in Law

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Sandra Fluke

Sandra fluke is an attorney who first came to public attention when, in February 2012, Republican members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee refused to allow her to testify to that committee on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover birth control during a discussion on whether medical insurance should have a contraception mandate. Fluke co-founded the New York Statewide Coalition for Fair Access to Family Court, which successfully advocated for unmarried victims of domestic violence, including teen LGBTQ victims. Fluke was also a member of the Manhattan Borough President's Taskforce on Domestic Violence./

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Charlotte E. Ray

Charlotte E. Ray was the first black female lawyer, admitted to the Washington, D.C., bar in 1872. Ray applied to the bar as C.E. Ray and was admitted because the bar admissions committee assumed she was a man. She also was the first woman permitted to argue cases in front of the Supreme Court in the capital. Ray championed a number of social causes outside of her classroom, becoming involved in the women’s suffrage movement and joining the National Association of Colored Women.

 

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated first in her class from Columbia Law School, going on to become a strong courtroom advocate for the fair treatment of women and working with the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project. She was appointed by President Carter to the U.S. Court of Appeals in 1980 and was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Clinton in 1993. She is the second female justice (after Sandra Day O'Connor) and the first Jewish female justice.

 

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Sonya Sotomayor

Sonya Sotomayor became the first Hispanic U.S. Supreme Court Justice in August 2009. She has been described as both outspoken and "quite brash" on the bench. In regard to diversity and life experiences among judges, she has commented that “I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experience would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't lived that life."

 

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Sarah Weddington

Sarah Weddington is an American attorney, law professor, and former Texas state legislator best known for representing "Jane Roe" in the landmark Roe v. Wade case before the United States Supreme Court. At the age of 27, Weddington remains the youngest person to argue a successful Supreme Court case. In 1992, Weddington compiled her experiences with the case and interviews with the people involved into a book titled A Question of Choice.

 

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