University of Rochester

H1N1 Influenza (or “swine flu”)

Latest Update

Flu cases   March 8, 2010
Three new cases was identified in the past week. The total number of cases identified is 469. No students are confined to their rooms at present. The University recorded its first case of influenza-like illness among students this year on September 8.


Protect Yourself

Weekly Buzz article archive

Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze.

Use alcohol-based hand cleaners if soap isn’t available.

Cover coughs and sneezes in your arm or sleeve, or cover your nose and mouth with a tissue. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it and wash your hands.

Keep hands away from your face; avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Avoid people who are ill.

Stay home from work or school if you are sick.

Clean shared space more often, such as telephone receivers, keyboards, door knobs, light switches, and office equipment.

Refrain from sharing such items as forks, spoons, toothbrushes, and towels.

Visit this self-assessment tool if you think you have the flu.

For more information, visit University Health Service.

H1N1 Symptoms

They are similar to the symptoms of regular flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting. If you have acute respiratory disease and have a fever of more than 101 degrees F, please seek medical attention through University Health Service at 585-275-2662 or your own physician.

H1N1 (first referred to as “swine flu” in April 2009) is a new influenza virus causing illness in people. Experts believe that the virus spreads from person-to-person in much the same way as regular seasonal influenza. Like seasonal flu, H1N1 flu in humans can vary in severity from mild to severe.



Flu Questions

When can I return to class or work after getting H1N1?

If I’m a resident student who is sick with flu symptoms, how can I get my meals?

If I have a family member at home who is sick with the flu, should I go to work?

Will the University keep track of flu cases affecting students, faculty, and staff?

Are travel advisories in effect?

Why is 2009 H1N1 virus sometimes called "swine flu"?

Where can I get more information?


When can I return to class or work after getting H1N1?

When your temperature has been less than 100 degrees F for 24 hours, you may return to class or to work.


If I have a family member at home who is sick with the flu, should I go to work?

Employees who are well but who have an ill family member at home with an influenza-like illness can go to work as usual, according to the recommendation of the Centers for Disease Control. Most people with the flu won’t know if they have H1N1 or another flu virus. These employees should monitor their health every day, and take precautions, including washing their hands often with soap and water, especially after they cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective. If they become ill, they should notify their supervisor and stay home. Employees who have an underlying medical condition or who are pregnant, should call their health care provider for advice because they might need to receive influenza antiviral drugs to minimize illness.


If I’m a resident student who is sick with flu symptoms, how can I get my meals?

While you are isolated in your room or apartment, you have several options for receiving meals:

Will the University keep track of flu cases affecting students, faculty, and staff?

There is not the time or the access to testing equipment to verify if everyone with a fever and other flu symptoms actually has novel H1N1. Medical experts say they will assume that people with those symptoms now and in the coming months do have H1N1 and should be treated in the prescribed manner. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will continue to report the total number of novel H1N1 flu hospitalizations and deaths each week.


Are travel advisories in effect?

The World Health Organization is not recommending travel restrictions related to the spread of H1N1 flu. Limiting travel and imposing travel restrictions would have very little effect on stopping the virus from spreading, but would be highly disruptive to the global community. Any changes to this recommendation would be posted at http://www.cdc.gov/travel/.


Why is 2009 H1N1 virus sometimes called “swine flu”?

This virus was originally referred to as “swine flu” because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs (swine) in North America. But further study has shown that this new virus is very different from what normally circulates in North American pigs. It has two genes from flu viruses that normally circulate in pigs in Europe and Asia and bird (avian) genes and human genes. Scientists call this a “quadruple reassortant” virus.


Where can I get more information?

The CDC has an excellent Web site with additional information at: http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/general_info.htm. The New York State Department of Health has a General Public Hotline at 1-800-808-1987.

The University Health Service has more medical information about protecting yourself against the flu. Check out its self-assessment tool as a guide and you won’t have to go to UHS. You also can call UHS at 585-275-2662.