August 23, 2014

Meliora - Ever Better

AS&E Graduate Student Association
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UR SPIE Colloquium Summer Series

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July 29, 2014

On Tuesday, July 29th the UR SPIE student chapter will be continuing its Summer Colloquium series. Please bring your lunch and come listen to our next presentation! Snacks and beverages will be provided. 

Who: 
Jose Perez

What:
 Design and Characterization of L3 Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Ultra-High Quality Factors
 
Abstract: Silicon-based photonic crystal nanocavities (PCNs) have potential applications in integrated quantum photonics [1, 2], because of their ability to strongly confine light in mode volumes approaching the diffraction limit and their CMOS-compatible fabrication process [3]. It was previously thought that PCN designs with a footprint small enough for ultra-dense integration, such as L3, H1 and H0 designs, could only achieve moderately high quality factors (Q), with both theoretical and experimental values never exceeding 300,000. Recently, an optimization procedure based on genetic algorithms has completely changed the scenario, showing a dramatic improvement of the Q-values in these PCNs [4]. A joint effort between our research group and a theory group at EPFL has resulted in the successful design and fabrication of a genetically improved L3 PCN with an ultra-high Q (~ 2 million), while maintaining a very small footprint and mode volume [5]. In this talk, I will describe the design process of these so-called super-L3 PCNs, as well as their characterization in the spectral domain using cross-polarization resonant scattering spectroscopy [6] and in the time domain using cavity ring down measurements [7].

When: 7/29/2014  11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Where: Sloan Auditorium (Goergen 101)
The SPIE Student Summer Colloquium Series is a weekly event to be held on Tuesdays from June to August. If you are a student willing to give a talk, please send an email to urspie@gmail.com with your talk title, a short abstract, and preferred talk date.
Do you want to know what your peers are doing in their research? Want to network with people from the same field? Would you like to benefit from scholarships and conference discounts? Well, then join SPIE now! Just go to spie.org to register to become a student member of the U of Rochester chapter or send an email to urspie@gmail.com if you have any questions.


 
References
 
[1]   J. O'Brien, A. Furusawa, and J. Vučković, "Photonic quantum technologies," Nature Photonics 3, 687-695 (2009).
[2]   J. Vuckovic, "Quantum optics and cavity QED with quantum dots in photonic crystals," arXiv:1402.2541 [quant-ph] (2014).
[3]   M. Notomi, "Manipulating light with strongly modulated photonic crystals," Reports on Progress in Physics 73, 096501 (2010).
[4]   M. Minkov and V. Savona, "Automated optimization of photonic crystal slab cavities," Scientific Reports (2014).
[5]   Y. Lai, S. Pirotta, G. Urbinati, D. Gerace, M. Minkov, V. Savona, A. Badolato, and M. Galli, "Genetically designed L3 photonic crystal nanocavities with quality factor exceeding one million," to be published, Applied Physics Letters (June 16, 2014).
[6]   M. Galli, S. L. Portalupi, M. Belotti, L. C. Andreani, L. O'Faolain, and T. F. Krauss, "Light scattering and Fano resonances in high-Q photonic crystal nanocavities," Applied Physics Letters 94, 071101 (2009).
[7]   T. Tanabe, M. Notomi, E. Kuramochi, A. Shinya, and H. Taniyama, "Trapping and delaying photons for one nanosecond in an ultrasmall high-Q photonic-crystal nanocavity," Nature Photonics 1, 49-52 (2007).
30

Dept of Chemical Engineering PhD Defense

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July 30, 2014

Kevin Klubek
Professor Ching Tang, Chemical Engineering, Advisor
 
Investigation of Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diode Instability
Phosphorescent emitters have played a critical role in the advance of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology. Among the phosphorescent emitters, the cyclometalated complexes with iridium (III) as the central atom are the most well developed and successfully commercialized. They are also among the most efficient. With chelating ligands specifically designed for color tuning, RGB (red, green and blue) emitters with nearly 100% (internal) quantum efficiency, defined as photons generated per injected electron, have been demonstrated. The operating lifetime of the phosphorescent OLED devices, however, remains an issue, particularly for the blue devices.
                    This thesis focuses on two phosphorescent blue dopants based on iridium; bis(4,6-difluorophenyl-pyridinato-N,C2) picolinate iridium (III) (FIrpic), and tris[1-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-2-phenyl-1H-imidazole] iridium (III) (Ir(iprpmi)3). FIrpic is perhaps the most well-known blue phosphorescent dopant that has demonstrated high quantum efficiency, but it has been found to produce short operational lifetimes. Ir(iprpmi)3 was chosen for this study because there were claims in patent literature that it provides excellent stability in OLED devices.
                    Using FIrpic as the blue dopant in the emitter layer, we have investigated the dependence of OLED performance, including device lifetime, on the compositions of the emitter layer (host-dopant) and the adjacent electron/hole transport layers. Regardless of the choice of the host materials in the emitter layer, or the materials in the transport layers, it is shown that the stability of OLED devices is poor (<12 hours) for devices using FIrpic as the blue phosphorescent dopant. Recombination that occurs on the host or transport materials is also found to be detrimental to device lifetime.
                    By tracking voltage and efficiency during operation for model devices with well known tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Alq) as the emitter, it is shown that in addition to its instability in charge recombination processes, FIrpic is also unstable with respect to hole-transport processes. This indicates that the FIrpic radical cation itself is unstable. It is also found that the host 3,3'-bis(N-carbazolyl)biphenyl (mCBP) is unstable to electron-hole recombination processes.
                    The photophysical properties of Ir(iprpmi)3 were studied. This material has a low ionization potential of 4.8 eV, which is indicative of a material possessing strong electron donor characteristics. Electron donating materials are typically associated with hole injecting or hole transporting materials. By adjusting the concentration of Ir(iprpmi)3 within the host mCBP, we show that Ir(iprpmi)3 is capable of trapping (at low concentration) and transporting (at high concentration) holes. In this way, the location of the recombination zone (RZ) is modulated. At low concentrations the RZ is confined near the hole-transport layer whereas at high concentration the RZ is shifted towards the electron-transport layer. The external quantum efficiency, EQE, defined as photons exiting the device per injected electron, can reach >20% as long as the RZ is adjacent a charge transport material that has a higher triplet energy than Ir(iprpmi)3. Due to molecular structural differences, device lifetime using Ir(iprpmi)3 as the emitting dopant is significantly improved compared to FIrpic. However, the lifetime is also highly dependent on the choice of material for the host and charge transport layers.
 
Wednesday July 30, 2014:  Schlegel Hall 207:  10 AM
 
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UR SPIE Colloquium Summer Series

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August 5, 2014

On Tuesday, August 5th the UR SPIE student chapter will be continuing its Summer Colloquium Series with a double header!

Please bring your lunch and come listen to our next presentation! Snacks and beverages will be provided. 

Speaker 1:
 Laura Kinnischtzke
What:
 Interfacing Matter and Light: An Overview of Quantum Dot Spectroscopy
Abstract: Three dimensional confinement of electrons is realized in self-assembled quantum dots, and they are strong candidates for charge qubits due to the relative ease with which a single electron’s spin can be manipulated, as well as their strong optical response in the near IR.  Although each dot has a discrete spectral emission profile, the optical properties (e.g. resonance position and linewidth) vary from dot to dot. This drawback is overcome with a series of both resonant and non-resonant spectroscopic measurements using a cryogenic confocal microscope. Applying static electric and magnetic fields allows the energy landscape of the dot to be fully explored. Future experiments include optical detection of electron spin resonance in a quantum dot, which can provide clues to how a quantum dot couples to the effective magnetic field created by the nuclei of host atoms.


Speaker 2: Kenny Goodfellow
What:  Integrated nanophotonics based on nanowire plasmons and atomically-thin material
Abstract:The continually increasing demands for higher speed and lower operating power devices have
resulted in the continued impetus to shrink photonic and electronic components. Atomically-thin materials, such as monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), have gained attention in this realm.  Monolayer MoS2 exhibits a direct band gap, displays large photoluminescence, and has shown promise in transistors, photodetectors, and LEDs.  I will demonstrate a primitive nanophotonic integrated circuit element composed of a single silver nanowire and single-layer MoS2 flake. I show that nanowire plasmons can excite MoS2 photoluminescence and that MoS2 excitons can decay into nanowire plasmons. I also show that the nanowire may serve the dual purpose of both exciting MoS2 photoluminescence via plasmons and recollecting the decaying exciton as nanowire plasmons.

When: 8/5/2014  11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Where: Sloan Auditorium (Goergen 101)

The SPIE Student Summer Colloquium Series is a weekly event to be held on Tuesdays from June to August.
***If you are a student willing to give a talk, please send an email to urspie@gmail.com with your talk title, a short abstract, and preferred talk date.
Do you want to know what your peers are doing in their research? Want to network with people from the same field? Would you like to benefit from scholarships and conference discounts? Well, then join SPIE now! Just go to spie.org to register to become a student member of the U of Rochester chapter or send an email to urspie@gmail.com if you have any questions.
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11

August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp

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August 11, 2014

BootCampGraphic
Registration for the August Boot Camp/Writing Retreat is now open!
All AS&E graduate students looking to make progress on a piece of academic writing are invited (and encouraged!) to participate. 
 
What: August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp
When: Monday, August 11 - Thursday, August 14
             Each day from 9 am to 1 pm 
Where: Dewey 2110D
 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat for AS&E graduate students working on any piece of academic writing (not just dissertations). You show up to write, and we provide a quiet space, refreshments, writing supplies, and strategy-based support. Accountability for your individual progress begins by sharing your writing goals and progress each day with a small group of peers. Come join us and see how the boot camp structure can improve your attitude and productivity.
 
Registration is limited to 20 AS&E graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. A $50 deposit is due upon registration. Additional information about the deposit policy and Boot Camp is below.
If registration is closed and you would like to be placed on a waiting list, or if you have other questions about Boot Camp, please contact the Graduate Writing Project: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu
 
 
We hope to see you at Boot Camp!
 
Tyler Cassidy-Heacock & Liz Tinelli
Graduate Writing Project
University of Rochester
 
 
*****
Dissertation Boot Camps are sponsored by the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program with support from the Dean of Graduate Studies.
 
Deposits
A deposit of $50 is required for participation in the Boot Camp. This deposit is due upon registration (or 1 week prior to Boot Camp, whichever comes first) and will be returned in full upon completion of the requirements, which include progress towards personal writing goals. If deposits are not paid before this deadline, your spot may be filled by someone on the waiting list. 
 
Deposits can be paid at the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program (RR G121), located near the stairs to Gleason Library in the Rush Rhees Library. The main office is open Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm. We can accept cash (exact change please) or checks payable to “The Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program.” 
 
We collect deposits for two reasons: to ensure attendance and to create accountability to yourself as a writer.
  • Attendance: If you register and pay the deposit, but do not attend Boot Camp, please understand that your deposit may be kept. If, however, there are extenuating circumstances, or we can fill your spot with someone from the wait list, then your deposit may be returned. 
  • Accountability: Once you begin attending Boot Camp, you have made a personal commitment to yourself and the community of writers at Boot Camp. Your deposit represents this commitment. If you are absent or repeatedly tardy, your deposit may be kept. 
 
What is a Dissertation Boot Camp? 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat; it provides a dedicated time and space for your writing. We do not assign writing or give lectures on writing during Boot Camps. While writing consultants are available to talk with you about your individual writing project, Boot Camp sessions are fairly independent, and you will spend most of the time working on your own writing project. At the start and end of sessions, you will share your writing goals and progress with a small group to help hold you accountable to making progress. A workshop on the first day will help you to create specific and concrete goals for the Boot Camp.
 
Who are Boot Camps for? 
Boot Camps are designed for UR graduate students from Arts, Sciences and Engineering who are working on graduate-level academic writing, such as dissertations, MA theses, dissertation proposals, papers for publication, etc. While the primary focus of Boot Camp is to write, we understand that writing and reading are an integrated process, and you are permitted to conduct short, focused readings during writing sessions, provided you have clear and specific goals. 
 
What will I do? 
A typical boot camp schedule is made up of 3 components:
  1. approximately 30 minutes at the start of each session to develop a writing goal and share your goal with a small group of peers
  2. approximately 3 hours of writing (during which you are welcome to take short breaks, help yourself to coffee, etc.)
  3. approximately 30 minutes to reflect on your progress and share the progress you made with a small group of peers
What kind of support is offered? 
In addition to having a quiet space, writing supplies, and snacks, you also have the option to schedule an individual appointment with a Writing Consultant during the hours of Boot Camp. All of our consultants are trained to work with writing from across the disciplines. In keeping with the policies and principles of the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program, consultants cannot provide editing or proofreading services, but they can discuss your writing project and process with you and share writing strategies useful to your work. For example, consultant sessions might include discussions about: 
  • Strategies for project management, including time management, setting reasonable short-term and long-term goals, recognizing progress, and creating action plans that help you meet writing and revision goals
  • Planning strategies, such as outlining, freewriting, and other pre-writing activities
  • Strategies for effective literature reviews or abstracts
  • Strategies for writing effective introductions or conclusions
  • Organizational strategies
  • Self-editing strategies
  • Revision techniques
How do I prepare?
Just show up with your materials! Writers at any stage of the writing process are welcome to join Boot Camp. Whether you have a course paper or are working on final edits for a dissertation, simply come to Boot Camp with the materials you need to make progress on your project (e.g., a laptop, reference materials, your research, etc.). 
 
Why not just write alone? 
Students that have participated in Boot Camps have reported making greater progress toward their writing goals. Accountability to, and being surrounded by, a group of peers helps students stay focused and motivated.
 
If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact us at: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu
12

August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp

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August 12, 2014

BootCampGraphic
Registration for the August Boot Camp/Writing Retreat is now open!
All AS&E graduate students looking to make progress on a piece of academic writing are invited (and encouraged!) to participate. 
 
What: August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp
When: Monday, August 11 - Thursday, August 14
             Each day from 9 am to 1 pm 
Where: Dewey 2110D
 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat for AS&E graduate students working on any piece of academic writing (not just dissertations). You show up to write, and we provide a quiet space, refreshments, writing supplies, and strategy-based support. Accountability for your individual progress begins by sharing your writing goals and progress each day with a small group of peers. Come join us and see how the boot camp structure can improve your attitude and productivity.
 
Registration is limited to 20 AS&E graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. A $50 deposit is due upon registration. Additional information about the deposit policy and Boot Camp is below.
If registration is closed and you would like to be placed on a waiting list, or if you have other questions about Boot Camp, please contact the Graduate Writing Project: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu
 
 
We hope to see you at Boot Camp!
 
Tyler Cassidy-Heacock & Liz Tinelli
Graduate Writing Project
University of Rochester
 
 
*****
Dissertation Boot Camps are sponsored by the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program with support from the Dean of Graduate Studies.
 
Deposits
A deposit of $50 is required for participation in the Boot Camp. This deposit is due upon registration (or 1 week prior to Boot Camp, whichever comes first) and will be returned in full upon completion of the requirements, which include progress towards personal writing goals. If deposits are not paid before this deadline, your spot may be filled by someone on the waiting list. 
 
Deposits can be paid at the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program (RR G121), located near the stairs to Gleason Library in the Rush Rhees Library. The main office is open Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm. We can accept cash (exact change please) or checks payable to “The Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program.” 
 
We collect deposits for two reasons: to ensure attendance and to create accountability to yourself as a writer.
  • Attendance: If you register and pay the deposit, but do not attend Boot Camp, please understand that your deposit may be kept. If, however, there are extenuating circumstances, or we can fill your spot with someone from the wait list, then your deposit may be returned. 
  • Accountability: Once you begin attending Boot Camp, you have made a personal commitment to yourself and the community of writers at Boot Camp. Your deposit represents this commitment. If you are absent or repeatedly tardy, your deposit may be kept. 
 
What is a Dissertation Boot Camp? 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat; it provides a dedicated time and space for your writing. We do not assign writing or give lectures on writing during Boot Camps. While writing consultants are available to talk with you about your individual writing project, Boot Camp sessions are fairly independent, and you will spend most of the time working on your own writing project. At the start and end of sessions, you will share your writing goals and progress with a small group to help hold you accountable to making progress. A workshop on the first day will help you to create specific and concrete goals for the Boot Camp.
 
Who are Boot Camps for? 
Boot Camps are designed for UR graduate students from Arts, Sciences and Engineering who are working on graduate-level academic writing, such as dissertations, MA theses, dissertation proposals, papers for publication, etc. While the primary focus of Boot Camp is to write, we understand that writing and reading are an integrated process, and you are permitted to conduct short, focused readings during writing sessions, provided you have clear and specific goals. 
 
What will I do? 
A typical boot camp schedule is made up of 3 components:
  1. approximately 30 minutes at the start of each session to develop a writing goal and share your goal with a small group of peers
  2. approximately 3 hours of writing (during which you are welcome to take short breaks, help yourself to coffee, etc.)
  3. approximately 30 minutes to reflect on your progress and share the progress you made with a small group of peers
What kind of support is offered? 
In addition to having a quiet space, writing supplies, and snacks, you also have the option to schedule an individual appointment with a Writing Consultant during the hours of Boot Camp. All of our consultants are trained to work with writing from across the disciplines. In keeping with the policies and principles of the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program, consultants cannot provide editing or proofreading services, but they can discuss your writing project and process with you and share writing strategies useful to your work. For example, consultant sessions might include discussions about: 
  • Strategies for project management, including time management, setting reasonable short-term and long-term goals, recognizing progress, and creating action plans that help you meet writing and revision goals
  • Planning strategies, such as outlining, freewriting, and other pre-writing activities
  • Strategies for effective literature reviews or abstracts
  • Strategies for writing effective introductions or conclusions
  • Organizational strategies
  • Self-editing strategies
  • Revision techniques
How do I prepare?
Just show up with your materials! Writers at any stage of the writing process are welcome to join Boot Camp. Whether you have a course paper or are working on final edits for a dissertation, simply come to Boot Camp with the materials you need to make progress on your project (e.g., a laptop, reference materials, your research, etc.). 
 
Why not just write alone? 
Students that have participated in Boot Camps have reported making greater progress toward their writing goals. Accountability to, and being surrounded by, a group of peers helps students stay focused and motivated.
 
If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact us at: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu

UR SPIE Colloquium Summer Series

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August 12, 2014

On Tuesday, August 12th the UR SPIE student chapter will be continuing its Summer Colloquium series. Please bring your lunch and come listen to our next presentation! Snacks and beverages will be provided. 

Who: 
Daniel Brooks

What:
 Precision Large Stroke Scanning System for Femtosecond Micromachining of Ophthalmic Materials
 
Abstract: Laser corrective surgery of the eye has become an increasingly common method for correcting vision in recent years.  The problem with current technologies in this area is that they are based on changing the shape of the cornea through material removal.  This is an inherently destructive process and either requires the removal of the epithelium (PRK) or cutting of a flap (LASIK).  Recently the Knox group has shown that it may be possible to perform noninvasive vision correction using femtosecond micromachining to alter the local index of refraction in the cornea.  This has been termed Intra-tissue Refractive Index Shaping (IRIS).  The IRIS process is dependent on energy deposition rate which is dependent on the intensity of the laser beam and the speed at which the focal spot of the beam travels through the cornea.  This leads to some interesting design problems because knowledge and control of the velocity of the focal spot of the beam becomes very important.  In this talk I will discuss the challenges involved in designing a scanning system that meets the requirements of the IRIS process as well as show my work on a possible solution.

When: 8/12/2014  11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Where: Sloan Auditorium (Goergen 101)
The SPIE Student Summer Colloquium Series is a weekly event to be held on Tuesdays from June to August. If you are a student willing to give a talk, please send an email to urspie@gmail.com with your talk title, a short abstract, and preferred talk date.
Do you want to know what your peers are doing in their research? Want to network with people from the same field? Would you like to benefit from scholarships and conference discounts? Well, then join SPIE now! Just go to spie.org to register to become a student member of the U of Rochester chapter or send an email to urspie@gmail.com if you have any questions.
13

August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp

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August 13, 2014

BootCampGraphic
Registration for the August Boot Camp/Writing Retreat is now open!
All AS&E graduate students looking to make progress on a piece of academic writing are invited (and encouraged!) to participate. 
 
What: August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp
When: Monday, August 11 - Thursday, August 14
             Each day from 9 am to 1 pm 
Where: Dewey 2110D
 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat for AS&E graduate students working on any piece of academic writing (not just dissertations). You show up to write, and we provide a quiet space, refreshments, writing supplies, and strategy-based support. Accountability for your individual progress begins by sharing your writing goals and progress each day with a small group of peers. Come join us and see how the boot camp structure can improve your attitude and productivity.
 
Registration is limited to 20 AS&E graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. A $50 deposit is due upon registration. Additional information about the deposit policy and Boot Camp is below.
If registration is closed and you would like to be placed on a waiting list, or if you have other questions about Boot Camp, please contact the Graduate Writing Project: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu
 
 
We hope to see you at Boot Camp!
 
Tyler Cassidy-Heacock & Liz Tinelli
Graduate Writing Project
University of Rochester
 
 
*****
Dissertation Boot Camps are sponsored by the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program with support from the Dean of Graduate Studies.
 
Deposits
A deposit of $50 is required for participation in the Boot Camp. This deposit is due upon registration (or 1 week prior to Boot Camp, whichever comes first) and will be returned in full upon completion of the requirements, which include progress towards personal writing goals. If deposits are not paid before this deadline, your spot may be filled by someone on the waiting list. 
 
Deposits can be paid at the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program (RR G121), located near the stairs to Gleason Library in the Rush Rhees Library. The main office is open Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm. We can accept cash (exact change please) or checks payable to “The Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program.” 
 
We collect deposits for two reasons: to ensure attendance and to create accountability to yourself as a writer.
  • Attendance: If you register and pay the deposit, but do not attend Boot Camp, please understand that your deposit may be kept. If, however, there are extenuating circumstances, or we can fill your spot with someone from the wait list, then your deposit may be returned. 
  • Accountability: Once you begin attending Boot Camp, you have made a personal commitment to yourself and the community of writers at Boot Camp. Your deposit represents this commitment. If you are absent or repeatedly tardy, your deposit may be kept. 
 
What is a Dissertation Boot Camp? 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat; it provides a dedicated time and space for your writing. We do not assign writing or give lectures on writing during Boot Camps. While writing consultants are available to talk with you about your individual writing project, Boot Camp sessions are fairly independent, and you will spend most of the time working on your own writing project. At the start and end of sessions, you will share your writing goals and progress with a small group to help hold you accountable to making progress. A workshop on the first day will help you to create specific and concrete goals for the Boot Camp.
 
Who are Boot Camps for? 
Boot Camps are designed for UR graduate students from Arts, Sciences and Engineering who are working on graduate-level academic writing, such as dissertations, MA theses, dissertation proposals, papers for publication, etc. While the primary focus of Boot Camp is to write, we understand that writing and reading are an integrated process, and you are permitted to conduct short, focused readings during writing sessions, provided you have clear and specific goals. 
 
What will I do? 
A typical boot camp schedule is made up of 3 components:
  1. approximately 30 minutes at the start of each session to develop a writing goal and share your goal with a small group of peers
  2. approximately 3 hours of writing (during which you are welcome to take short breaks, help yourself to coffee, etc.)
  3. approximately 30 minutes to reflect on your progress and share the progress you made with a small group of peers
What kind of support is offered? 
In addition to having a quiet space, writing supplies, and snacks, you also have the option to schedule an individual appointment with a Writing Consultant during the hours of Boot Camp. All of our consultants are trained to work with writing from across the disciplines. In keeping with the policies and principles of the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program, consultants cannot provide editing or proofreading services, but they can discuss your writing project and process with you and share writing strategies useful to your work. For example, consultant sessions might include discussions about: 
  • Strategies for project management, including time management, setting reasonable short-term and long-term goals, recognizing progress, and creating action plans that help you meet writing and revision goals
  • Planning strategies, such as outlining, freewriting, and other pre-writing activities
  • Strategies for effective literature reviews or abstracts
  • Strategies for writing effective introductions or conclusions
  • Organizational strategies
  • Self-editing strategies
  • Revision techniques
How do I prepare?
Just show up with your materials! Writers at any stage of the writing process are welcome to join Boot Camp. Whether you have a course paper or are working on final edits for a dissertation, simply come to Boot Camp with the materials you need to make progress on your project (e.g., a laptop, reference materials, your research, etc.). 
 
Why not just write alone? 
Students that have participated in Boot Camps have reported making greater progress toward their writing goals. Accountability to, and being surrounded by, a group of peers helps students stay focused and motivated.
 
If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact us at: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu
14

August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp

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August 14, 2014

BootCampGraphic
Registration for the August Boot Camp/Writing Retreat is now open!
All AS&E graduate students looking to make progress on a piece of academic writing are invited (and encouraged!) to participate. 
 
What: August “Early Bird” Dissertation Boot Camp
When: Monday, August 11 - Thursday, August 14
             Each day from 9 am to 1 pm 
Where: Dewey 2110D
 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat for AS&E graduate students working on any piece of academic writing (not just dissertations). You show up to write, and we provide a quiet space, refreshments, writing supplies, and strategy-based support. Accountability for your individual progress begins by sharing your writing goals and progress each day with a small group of peers. Come join us and see how the boot camp structure can improve your attitude and productivity.
 
Registration is limited to 20 AS&E graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis. A $50 deposit is due upon registration. Additional information about the deposit policy and Boot Camp is below.
If registration is closed and you would like to be placed on a waiting list, or if you have other questions about Boot Camp, please contact the Graduate Writing Project: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu
 
 
We hope to see you at Boot Camp!
 
Tyler Cassidy-Heacock & Liz Tinelli
Graduate Writing Project
University of Rochester
 
 
*****
Dissertation Boot Camps are sponsored by the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program with support from the Dean of Graduate Studies.
 
Deposits
A deposit of $50 is required for participation in the Boot Camp. This deposit is due upon registration (or 1 week prior to Boot Camp, whichever comes first) and will be returned in full upon completion of the requirements, which include progress towards personal writing goals. If deposits are not paid before this deadline, your spot may be filled by someone on the waiting list. 
 
Deposits can be paid at the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program (RR G121), located near the stairs to Gleason Library in the Rush Rhees Library. The main office is open Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm. We can accept cash (exact change please) or checks payable to “The Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program.” 
 
We collect deposits for two reasons: to ensure attendance and to create accountability to yourself as a writer.
  • Attendance: If you register and pay the deposit, but do not attend Boot Camp, please understand that your deposit may be kept. If, however, there are extenuating circumstances, or we can fill your spot with someone from the wait list, then your deposit may be returned. 
  • Accountability: Once you begin attending Boot Camp, you have made a personal commitment to yourself and the community of writers at Boot Camp. Your deposit represents this commitment. If you are absent or repeatedly tardy, your deposit may be kept. 
 
What is a Dissertation Boot Camp? 
Boot Camp is an intensive writing retreat; it provides a dedicated time and space for your writing. We do not assign writing or give lectures on writing during Boot Camps. While writing consultants are available to talk with you about your individual writing project, Boot Camp sessions are fairly independent, and you will spend most of the time working on your own writing project. At the start and end of sessions, you will share your writing goals and progress with a small group to help hold you accountable to making progress. A workshop on the first day will help you to create specific and concrete goals for the Boot Camp.
 
Who are Boot Camps for? 
Boot Camps are designed for UR graduate students from Arts, Sciences and Engineering who are working on graduate-level academic writing, such as dissertations, MA theses, dissertation proposals, papers for publication, etc. While the primary focus of Boot Camp is to write, we understand that writing and reading are an integrated process, and you are permitted to conduct short, focused readings during writing sessions, provided you have clear and specific goals. 
 
What will I do? 
A typical boot camp schedule is made up of 3 components:
  1. approximately 30 minutes at the start of each session to develop a writing goal and share your goal with a small group of peers
  2. approximately 3 hours of writing (during which you are welcome to take short breaks, help yourself to coffee, etc.)
  3. approximately 30 minutes to reflect on your progress and share the progress you made with a small group of peers
What kind of support is offered? 
In addition to having a quiet space, writing supplies, and snacks, you also have the option to schedule an individual appointment with a Writing Consultant during the hours of Boot Camp. All of our consultants are trained to work with writing from across the disciplines. In keeping with the policies and principles of the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program, consultants cannot provide editing or proofreading services, but they can discuss your writing project and process with you and share writing strategies useful to your work. For example, consultant sessions might include discussions about: 
  • Strategies for project management, including time management, setting reasonable short-term and long-term goals, recognizing progress, and creating action plans that help you meet writing and revision goals
  • Planning strategies, such as outlining, freewriting, and other pre-writing activities
  • Strategies for effective literature reviews or abstracts
  • Strategies for writing effective introductions or conclusions
  • Organizational strategies
  • Self-editing strategies
  • Revision techniques
How do I prepare?
Just show up with your materials! Writers at any stage of the writing process are welcome to join Boot Camp. Whether you have a course paper or are working on final edits for a dissertation, simply come to Boot Camp with the materials you need to make progress on your project (e.g., a laptop, reference materials, your research, etc.). 
 
Why not just write alone? 
Students that have participated in Boot Camps have reported making greater progress toward their writing goals. Accountability to, and being surrounded by, a group of peers helps students stay focused and motivated.
 
If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact us at: gradwriting@ur.rochester.edu

Dept of Electrical & Computer Engineering Master's Thesis Defense

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August 14, 2014

Temperature-Dependent Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy
of Thin-Film Vanadium Dioxide
 
Graham Jensen
 
Supervised by
Professor Roman Sobolewski
 
Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is characterized as a transitional-metal oxide that undergoes an abrupt insulator-to-metal phase transition upon a threshold-crossing external stimulus such as heating above a critical temperature of ~344 K, applying a sufficient electric field, or optical excitation above a threshold fluence. In this thesis, temperature-dependent, degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy measurements of ~300-nm-thick VO2 grown on MgO via pulsed laser deposition are described and reveal a significant qualitative difference between the optical absorption and relaxation dynamics of the material’s insulating and metallic states.  Upon perturbation by a ~100-fs-wide, 800-nm-wavelength pumping laser pulse, insulating VO2 displays an initial, system-limited 300 fs-long decrease in reflectivity followed by a bi-exponential relaxation to its equilibrium state with time constants  = 0.50 ps and  = 2.63 ps attributed to electron thermalization and optical phonon scattering, respectively.  In VO2’s metallic state, the perturbing pump pulse induces an initial ~320 fs FWHM Gaussian-shaped decrease in reflectivity tentatively attributed to a decrease in probe beam reflection due to enhanced two-photon absorption at the pump and probe pulse correlation time.  The remainder of the metallic state reflection change transient is characterized by a ~10 ps rise-time followed by an acoustic-phonon-scattering-attributed exponential relaxation with a time constant of  = 402.5 ps.  Degenerate pump-probe spectroscopy measurements of current-carrying VO2 are also presented and show that the measured transients at transition-threshold-crossing currents display qualitatively similar responses to thermally-induced metallic state VO2 transients, suggesting that the two stimuli perturb the system into a common state.
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Dept of Electrical & Computer Engineering Master's Thesis Defense

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August 15, 2014

Temperature-Dependent Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy
of Thin-Film Vanadium Dioxide
 
Graham Jensen
 
Supervised by
Professor Roman Sobolewski
 
Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is characterized as a transitional-metal oxide that undergoes an abrupt insulator-to-metal phase transition upon a threshold-crossing external stimulus such as heating above a critical temperature of ~344 K, applying a sufficient electric field, or optical excitation above a threshold fluence. In this thesis, temperature-dependent, degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy measurements of ~300-nm-thick VO2 grown on MgO via pulsed laser deposition are described and reveal a significant qualitative difference between the optical absorption and relaxation dynamics of the material’s insulating and metallic states.  Upon perturbation by a ~100-fs-wide, 800-nm-wavelength pumping laser pulse, insulating VO2 displays an initial, system-limited 300 fs-long decrease in reflectivity followed by a bi-exponential relaxation to its equilibrium state with time constants  = 0.50 ps and  = 2.63 ps attributed to electron thermalization and optical phonon scattering, respectively.  In VO2’s metallic state, the perturbing pump pulse induces an initial ~320 fs FWHM Gaussian-shaped decrease in reflectivity tentatively attributed to a decrease in probe beam reflection due to enhanced two-photon absorption at the pump and probe pulse correlation time.  The remainder of the metallic state reflection change transient is characterized by a ~10 ps rise-time followed by an acoustic-phonon-scattering-attributed exponential relaxation with a time constant of  = 402.5 ps.  Degenerate pump-probe spectroscopy measurements of current-carrying VO2 are also presented and show that the measured transients at transition-threshold-crossing currents display qualitatively similar responses to thermally-induced metallic state VO2 transients, suggesting that the two stimuli perturb the system into a common state.
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**GSA Canoe Trip Sunday Aug. 17, 2014**

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August 17, 2014

Join us this Sunday (Aug. 17th) for a canoe trip down the Genesee River! We'll be meeting at the Genesee Waterways Center Boathouse (directions here) at 2 pm and plan to be out until about 4:30. We only have 30 spots available, so please RSVP here by Saturday at 5 pm. Hope to see you there!

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GSA Coffee Hour

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August 20, 2014

Take a break from studying/research and join us for this month's Coffee Hour on Wednesday, August 20th! We'll have coffee, tea, juice, and breakfast food from 9 - 10:30 am in Goergen 108 (note location change from last time!). Stop by for a few minutes or stay the whole time and meet some other grad students! This is also a great time to meet the GSA officers and let us know any ideas you might have!

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Career Development: How to Turn Your PhD Skills Into Work You'll Love

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August 21, 2014

Hoto TurYour PhD Skills...Into WorYou'lLove
 Pleasjoin us fotalgivebyDrMrimBoutl(BCSPhD'03)
of MoreThanMoney(MTM)Careers
 
 
Thursday,  August 21st
 Class o1962 Auditorium(G-9425)
 4:00-5:30pm

Offices for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs

601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 316 • Rochester, NY 14642-8316

585.275.4522 phone • 585.461.4927 fax • www.urmc.rochester.edu/education/graduate

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Science Careers with the FBI

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August 26, 2014

FBI_Careers

Special Presentation & Career Development Workshop

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August 26, 2014

Foreign Intelligence Threat Awareness and Careers with the Federal Bureau of Investigation
 
All Graduate Students Postdoctoral Appointees Faculty &  Staff are invited to attend.
 
Presented by:  Special Agents Chad Kaestle, Darin Schultz and Christina Peklak-Scott, PhD

US Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

1:00 – 3:00 pm

Medical Center - Class of ’62 Auditorium

Reception to follow

3:00 – 4:00 pm

Flaum Atrium

Sponsored by:

Office of Government and Academic Research Alliances SMD Graduate Student Society

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Need Disability Services?

If you or someone you know need disability accomodations to any GSA event please feel free to contact GSA directly at : GSA@rochester.edu

Contact your GSA

If you have any questions, comments, ideas or concerns please contact GSA directly at : GSA@rochester.edu

Upcoming Events

 
  • Science Careers with the FBI
    August 26, 2014 — 1:00 pm
  • Special Presentation & Career Development Workshop
    August 26, 2014 — 1:00 pm

    More events and information