Tag: Brain and Cognitive Sciences

Want to boost your brain power? A new study says video games are the answer.

Want to boost your brain power? A new study says video games are the answer.

November 13, 2014

Remember when you told your kids that spending too much time playing video games would make them lazy?

Now there’s a perfect comeback: Playing video games can actually make you smarter.

Really. According to a study published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, playing fast-paced action video games can make someone a better learner.

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Could playing video games make you smarter?

Could playing video games make you smarter?

November 12, 2014

“Prior research by our group and others has shown that action gamers excel at many tasks. In this new study, we show they excel because they are better learners,” said Daphne Bavelier, a research professor in brain and cognitive sciences at the University of Rochester. “And they become better learners by playing the fast-paced action games.” Bavelier said our brains keep predicting what will come next – whether when listening to a conversation, driving, or even preforming surgery. “

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‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys

‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys

October 17, 2014

Recent studies have showed that the color red tends to increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions.

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University mourns sudden loss of David Knill

University mourns sudden loss of David Knill

October 8, 2014

Knill, who came to the University as an associate professor in 1999, was a leading scientist in the study of human perception. He also served as the associate director of the Center for Visual Science since 2001. Most of his work, which included over 60 research and review articles, focused on visual perception and how humans use vision to guide physical actions.

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That’s so random: why we persist in seeing streaks

That’s so random: why we persist in seeing streaks

June 26, 2014

Dr. Wilke’s latest experiment sought to test whether the hot hand bias was even more universal.

“The strongest test to see if it’s evolutionary is to find it in another species,” said Dr. Hayden, who studies how monkeys make decisions.

So, he and Dr. Wilke developed a game for monkeys to play.

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Aslin Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Aslin Elected to National Academy of Sciences

May 1, 2013

Richard Aslin, the William R. Kenan Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and director of the Rochester Center for Brain Imaging at the University of Rochester, has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Membership in the academy is one of the highest honors given to a scientist or engineer in […]

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