Please consider downloading the latest version of Internet Explorer
to experience this site as intended.
Tools Search Main Menu

Tag: Department of Biology

Parasitic DNA stops “jumping” when protein takes charge

Parasitic DNA stops “jumping” when protein takes charge

September 23, 2014

Biology researchers Vera Gorbunova and Andrei Seluanov report that the “jumping genes” in mice become active as the mice age when a multi-function protein stops keeping them in check in order to take on another role. A protein called Sirt6 is needed to keep the jumping genes—technically known as retrotransposons—inactive.

Continue Reading

Absurd Creature of the Week: The naked mole rat could one day save your life

Absurd Creature of the Week: The naked mole rat could one day save your life

September 12, 2014

Biologist Vera Gorbunova studies these creatures at the University of Rochester. She says naked mole rat societies, which can reach 300 individuals, are more like dictatorships than monarchies because anyone with the gumption can ascend the throne.

Continue Reading

Less effective DNA repair process takes over as mice age, biologists find

Less effective DNA repair process takes over as mice age, biologists find

September 9, 2014

Biologists Vera Gorbunova and Andei Seluanov have discovered one reason for the the increase in DNA damage as we age: the primary repair process begins to fail and is replaced by one that is less accurate.

Continue Reading

Targeting protein-making machinery to stop harmful bacteria

Targeting protein-making machinery to stop harmful bacteria

September 7, 2014

One challenge in killing off harmful bacteria is that many of them develop a resistance to antibiotics. Researchers at the University of Rochester are targeting the formation of the protein-making machinery in those cells as a possible alternate way to stop the bacteria.

Continue Reading

Targeting cells’ protein-making machinery may stop harmful bacteria

Targeting cells’ protein-making machinery may stop harmful bacteria

September 7, 2014

For the first time, the middle-steps in the process that creates the protein-making machinery of bacterial cells—called the ribosomes—has been isolated. A new study by biologist Gloria Culver suggests that blocking these pathways may help kill off drug-resistant bacteria.

Continue Reading

Alternate mechanism of species formation picks up support, thanks to a South American ant

Alternate mechanism of species formation picks up support, thanks to a South American ant

August 22, 2014

Pictured at left is the queen ant of the parasitic species Mycocepurus castrator. This ant, only found in a single patch of eucalyptus trees on the São Paulo State University campus in Brazil, branched off from its original species while living in the same colony, something thought rare in current models of evolutionary development.

Continue Reading

Alternate mechanism of species formation picks up support,  thanks to a South American ant

Alternate mechanism of species formation picks up support, thanks to a South American ant

August 21, 2014

A newly-discovered species of ant supports a controversial theory of species formation. “Most new species come about in geographic isolation,” said Christian Rabeling, assistant professor of biology at the University of Rochester. “We now have evidence that speciation can take place within a single colony.”

Continue Reading

When temperatures drop, newly-discovered process helps fruit flies cope

When temperatures drop, newly-discovered process helps fruit flies cope

July 21, 2014

Rochester biologist Michael Welte and his team made their discovery while studying the internal mechanisms of the egg cell of the fruit fly, known as Drosophila. What keeps the assembly line functioning—based on the new research—is a protein called Klar.

Continue Reading

Protein anchors help keep embryonic development “just right”

Protein anchors help keep embryonic development “just right”

June 12, 2014

Findings on the cellular-level regulation of proteins called histones by lipid droplets, or “fat depots,” shines light on chromosome production – and possible manipulation of that process.

Continue Reading

Biologist Vera Gorbunova to lead 5-year project on longevity

Biologist Vera Gorbunova to lead 5-year project on longevity

April 23, 2014

A $9.5 million grant from the National Institute on Aging will support research into the factors responsible for longevity in various species of long-lived rodents, with the goal of developing treatments to improve the aging process in people.

Continue Reading