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Tag: Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Icy air reveals human-made methane levels higher than previously believed

Icy air reveals human-made methane levels higher than previously believed

August 24, 2017

Professor Vasilii Petrenko and his team are studying the air trapped in ice cores that date back nearly 12,000 years, long before mankind’s use of fossil fuels, to separate man-made from naturally occurring methane sources.

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Creating communal spaces through public art

Creating communal spaces through public art

August 3, 2017

As part of the Take Five Scholars Program, Madison Carter ’18 is researching how public art—such as murals, sculptures, even performance art—influences social interactions in the city of Rochester.

This summer, the English literature and environmental studies major is interning with Richard Margolis, a well-known area photographer who documents art, architecture, and landmarks, and then compiles them into searchable databases. Carter is contributing to the descriptions of each piece of public art, researching the stories associated with their creation, and contacting the artists themselves for their input. She is also identifying additional works of public art to include in the database. (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

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Largest research vessel on the Great Lakes brings Rochester science to Chicago’s Navy Pier

Largest research vessel on the Great Lakes brings Rochester science to Chicago’s Navy Pier

June 22, 2017

Researchers led by earth and environmental sciences professor John Kessler met with schoolchildren and local media aboard the Blue Heron to discuss the team’s work on methane levels in the Great Lakes.

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Ancient ozone levels provide a glimpse into future effects of climate change

Ancient ozone levels provide a glimpse into future effects of climate change

June 15, 2017

A computer model developed at Rochester, and used to compare model data to analysis on 100,000-year-old Greenland ice cores, has shown a surprising result.

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Using data science to understand global climate systems

Using data science to understand global climate systems

April 21, 2017

Climate scientists and computer scientists are working together to understand what drives the global climate system—from deep in the ocean to high in the sky.

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Tarduno awarded medal for paleomagnetic research

Tarduno awarded medal for paleomagnetic research

March 21, 2017

The European Geosciences Union awarded its 2017 Petrus Peregrinus Medal to John Tarduno, a professor of geophysics, in recognition of his research on the evolution of the early Earth’s magnetic field.

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Gas hydrate breakdown unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release

Gas hydrate breakdown unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release

February 8, 2017

A recent interpretive review of scientific literature performed by researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey and here at Rochester pays particular attention to gas hydrates beneath the Arctic Ocean.

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Earth’s magnetic field—reversing or fluctuating?

Earth’s magnetic field—reversing or fluctuating?

February 8, 2017

For the last 160 years, the Earth’s magnetic field has been weakening. In an essay shared on Newsweek, professor John Tarduno explains archaeomagnetism research, in which geophysicists team up with archaeologists to study the effects of these changes.

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First-of-its-kind study examines Great Lakes methane

First-of-its-kind study examines Great Lakes methane

January 6, 2017

There is very little data on the methane levels in the Great Lakes, the world’s largest collection of freshwater. Early last spring, earth and environmental sciences professor John Kessler invited five undergraduate students and a master’s degree candidate on a research venture designed to change that.

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