Tag: Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Ancient crystals show Earth’s magnetic field switched on early

Ancient crystals show Earth’s magnetic field switched on early

August 5, 2015

To probe the origin of Earth’s magnetism, a team led by John Tarduno retrieved rock samples from the Jack Hills in Western Australia – home to some of the oldest rocks on the planet.

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Earth magnetic shield is older than previously thought

Earth magnetic shield is older than previously thought

July 31, 2015

The Earth’s magnetic field, which shields the atmosphere from harmful radiation, is at least four billion years old, according to scientists.

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Researchers find that Earth’s magnetic shield is 500 million years older than previously thought

Researchers find that Earth’s magnetic shield is 500 million years older than previously thought

July 30, 2015

Since 2010, the best estimate of the age of Earth’s magnetic field has been 3.45 billion years. But now the Rochester researcher responsible for that finding has new data showing the magnetic field is far older.

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First measurements taken of South Africa’s iron age magnetic field history

First measurements taken of South Africa’s iron age magnetic field history

July 28, 2015

Combined with the current weakening of Earth’s magnetic field, the data suggest that the region of Earth’s core beneath southern Africa may play a special role in reversals of the planet’s magnetic poles.

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Ancient huts may reveal clues to earth’s magnetic pole reversals

Ancient huts may reveal clues to earth’s magnetic pole reversals

July 28, 2015

Patches of ground where huts were burned down in southern Africa contain a key mineral that recorded the magnetic field at the time of each ritual burning.

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Carbon’s importance to ocean life’s survival 252 million years ago

Carbon’s importance to ocean life’s survival 252 million years ago

April 7, 2015

A new study demonstrates for the first time how elemental carbon became an important construction material of some forms of ocean life after one of the greatest mass extinctions in the history of Earth more than 252 million years ago.

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Connections: Science Roundtable January 2015

Connections: Science Roundtable January 2015

January 5, 2015

During this science roundtable we talk about climate change, global warming, and how nitrous oxide plays a role in the planet’s warming with University of Rochester Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vas Petrenko.

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Bend in Appalachian mountain chain finally explained

Bend in Appalachian mountain chain finally explained

July 18, 2014

Rochester researchers now know what causes the bend in the otherwise straight line of the Appalachian Mountains, and this new understanding of the region’s underlying structures could inform debates over the practice of hyrdrofracking.

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Andes mountains formed by ‘growth spurts’

Andes mountains formed by ‘growth spurts’

April 21, 2014

Scientists have long been trying to understand how the Andes and other broad, high-elevation mountain ranges were formed. New research by Carmala Garzione, professor of earth and environmental sciences, provides an explanation.

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First 3-D image of structure below Sierra Negra volcano created

First 3-D image of structure below Sierra Negra volcano created

March 5, 2014

Home to some of the most active volcanoes in the world, researchers now have a better picture of the subterranean plumbing system that feeds the Galápagos volcanoes.

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