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Tag: quantum physics

Quantum magic makes quick work of measuring frequency

Quantum magic makes quick work of measuring frequency

November 8, 2017

Using the strange rules of quantum mechanics, researchers were able to put a quantum bit in a superposition of two different energy states at the same time in order to speed up the accurate measurement of frequencies.

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Enigma Machine takes a quantum leap

Enigma Machine takes a quantum leap

September 6, 2016

Researchers have developed a “quantum enigma machine” to improve on data encryption. The device manipulates photons to create an unbreakable encrypted message with a key that’s far shorter than the message—the first time that has ever been done.

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How real is reality?

How real is reality?

January 5, 2016

Reality, in other words, seems pretty stubborn, pretty fixed — and pretty much independent of whatever is going on in your head. But is it? Is it really all those things?

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There’s a hidden connection between pi and quantum mechanics

There’s a hidden connection between pi and quantum mechanics

November 16, 2015

Physicists have uncovered a hidden connection between a famous 350-year-old mathematical formula for pi, everyone’s favourite irrational number, and quantum mechanics. At least one mathematician has pronounced the discovery “a cunning piece of magic.”

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Drawing a line between quantum and classical: Bell’s Inequality fails test as boundary

Drawing a line between quantum and classical: Bell’s Inequality fails test as boundary

July 21, 2015

The best guide to the boundary between our everyday world and the “spooky” features of the quantum world has been a theorem called Bell’s Inequality, but now a new paper shows that we understand the frontiers of that quantum world less well than scientists have thought.

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Drawing a line between quantum and classical world

Drawing a line between quantum and classical world

July 21, 2015

In the new paper, published in the July 20 edition of Optica, University of Rochester researchers show that a classical beam of light that would be expected to obey Bell’s Inequality can fail this test in the lab, if the beam is properly prepared to have a particular feature: entanglement.

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One concept that gives physicists a Casper-like haunting

One concept that gives physicists a Casper-like haunting

May 19, 2015

One of the most profound forms of “quantum weirdness” lies at the heart of our butt/chair/empty space question. It’s called the wave-particle duality. It tells us that something, like an electron, can behave like a particle — if you do experiments that look for particle-like behavior.

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Lecture by world-renowned physicist brings quantum mechanics to the masses

Lecture by world-renowned physicist brings quantum mechanics to the masses

September 8, 2014

Anton Zeilinger, one of the world’s leading experts in the field of quantum optics, will present a free, public lecture Tuesday at the University of Rochester. The talk is designed to convey the exciting frontiers of quantum mechanics to a general audience.

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New quantum particle calculations make waves in field

New quantum particle calculations make waves in field

September 5, 2014

The huge multidimensional systems have complicated wave functions that the old method is not efficient enough to measure, Mohammad Mirhosseini, a graduate student at the University of Rochester and lead author on the paper describing the new technique, told Live Science. The new method makes it possible to calculate wave functions much faster and could help scientists further develop quantum technology.

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Researchers send electricity, light along same super-thin wire

Researchers send electricity, light along same super-thin wire

September 4, 2014

A new combination of materials can efficiently guide electricity and light along the same tiny wire, a finding that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light.

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