Simulcast of Bill Nye’s appearance offered

A simulcast of the sold out “An Evening with Bill Nye” will be offered Saturday, September 5, at 8 p.m. in Hubbell Auditorium, Hutchison Hall. A limited number of tickets for the simulcast are available at the Common Market in Wilson Commons.

Members of the University of Rochester community will be able to watch Bill Nye's on-campus performance via simulcast.

Members of the University of Rochester community will be able to watch Bill Nye’s on-campus performance via simulcast.

 

Tickets are $3 for students, faculty, and staff. Nye, a mechanical engineer and star of the popular 1990s TV show Bill Nye The Science Guy, is a featured guest for Yellowjacket Weekend. He will appear at the Strong Auditorium. His show sold out within hours of tickets going on sale earlier this week.

Nye is a science educator, comedian, television personality, inventor and former mechanical engineer who has appeared on such TV shows as The Big Bang Theory, Numb3rs, Larry King Live and Dancing With The Stars.

 

First day is in the books

The calendar says there are three weeks left in summer, and the thermometer seems to agree.

But tell that to the University of Rochester students who began classes on Monday.

The River Campus was filled with lots of chatter as friendships were renewed – or forged. It was the first day of college for some, and the first day of the final year for others.

Here’s a look at The First Day:

Students occupy Gavett 202 at 9 a.m. as Professor Roy Jones hands out his first lecture. This is Jones' first time teaching an undergraduate course in Business Information System and Analystics after years of teaching MBA students.

Students occupy Gavett 202 at 9 a.m. as Professor Roy Jones hands out his first lecture. This is Jones’ first time teaching an undergraduate course in Business Information System and Analystics after years of teaching MBA students.

 

It's the first day of working at Carlson Library for Tyler Trine. He's keeping track of the number of students who go to the library on each floor.

It’s the first day of working at Carlson Library for Tyler Trine. He’s keeping track of the number of students who go to the library on each floor.

 

Andrew Lee, a freshman planning to major in Chemistry, talks with Professor Daniel J. Weix after class.

Andrew Lee, a freshman planning to major in Chemistry, talks with Professor Daniel J. Weix after class.

 

Students wait for a physics class - Electricity and Magnetism - outside Hoyt Hall.

Students wait for a physics class – Electricity and Magnetism – outside Hoyt Hall.

 

The study zone on the third floor at the Carlson Library was pretty quiet on the first day of school.

The study zone on the third floor at the Carlson Library was pretty quiet on the first day of school.

 

Qingrong Ruan, a junior studying mathematics, was busy picking up his boxes at the post office and moving them to his dorm.

Qingrong Ruan, a junior studying mathematics, was busy picking up his boxes at the post office and moving them to his dorm.

 

Burrito Bowl and Panda Express are among the restaurants in Wilson Commons that reopened the first day of school.

Burrito Bowl and Panda Express are among the restaurants in Wilson Commons that reopened the first day of school.

 

This is Professor Michelle Brown's sixth year teaching Spanish at the University of Rochester. Here, she talks with sophomore Paul Vu after class.

This is Professor Michelle Brown’s sixth year teaching Spanish at the University of Rochester. Here, she talks with sophomore Paul Vu after class.

 

Students walk into Hubbell Auditorium just before lunch for a lecture.

Students walk into Hubbell Auditorium just before lunch for a lecture.

Tunnel Vision: A fresh coat of paint on an old tradition

If you’re new to the University of Rochester and wonder how you’re going to trek across campus in the snow, the answer is simple: tunnels.

Tunnel travel has existed at the River Campus since the early 1930s. The first ones were under Rush Rhees Library and the academic quad. Tunnels between Hoyt, Schlegel, Meliora Hall and Wilson Commons were added later.

Painting the Eastman Quad tunnel is one of the cooler traditions on campus, and it originated in the early 1970s as students would paint slogans or proclamations or just display their artwork.

Nowadays, painting the tunnel walls is often a group activity for Greek organizations, class councils, and groups hosting special events or raising awareness. There are a few rules:

1. No painting of profanities, obscenities or hate speech.

2. Never paint over another group’s work before the event advertised is completed.

3. No spray painting, because it is an enclosed space.

A new year means a new coat of paint. And in keeping with tradition, several student volunteers were out in force last weekend with their rollers, giving the tunnels a fresh coat of yellow paint. Buzz student intern Joy Bian was there to capture the fun. Please check out her video below:

 

 

Move-In Day 2015: Let’s get it started!

And we’re off!

On Tuesday, Aug. 25, more than 1,300 incoming freshmen from 47 states moved into their dorms on the University of Rochester River Campus.

The stream of cars began lining up at 8 a.m. in Park Lot, all of them crammed with luggage, laptops, bedding – and eager freshmen. The cars proceeded in an orderly fashion to Susan B. Anthony Halls and the freshman Quad.

By 2:30 p.m., the last of the cars had departed from Park Lot.

“My mom prepared lots of pictures of my family and put them on my fridge,” one freshman named Amber said. “I ‘m really excited about starting a new school year.”

A 17-year-old freshman named Sadya brought her favorite teddy bear all the way from Virginia. Austin Halliday from Tennessee drove 12 1/2 hours only to discover he had forgetten his favorite tennis racket.

“I’ll probably get it shipped because I love it so much,” he said.

The first day of classes is Monday, August 31. And the Class of 2019 is ready.

Here are pictures from a great day on the River Campus!

One of the longest treks to the University of Rochester campus was a family from New Mexico who drove 1,883 miles.

One of the longest treks to the University of Rochester campus was a family from New Mexico who drove 1,883 miles.

What would Move-In Day be without a performance from the University's Pep Band?

What would Move-In Day be without a performance from the University’s Pep Band?

The Midnight Ramblers serenaded freshmen and parents with Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed, Delivered, I'm Yours."

The Midnight Ramblers serenaded freshmen and parents with Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered, I’m Yours.”

Todd Clausen of the Democrat and Chronicle interviews Eleanor Oi, the University's Director of Orientation.

Todd Clausen of the Democrat and Chronicle interviews Eleanor Oi, the University’s Director of Orientation.

A group of energetic upper classmen helped ease the transition to college life for the Class of 2019.

A group of energetic upper classmen helped ease the transition to college life for the Class of 2019.

Once the freshmen were moved in, they (and their parents) visited the Orientation Expo in the Goergen Athletic Center's Field House.

Once the freshmen were moved in, they (and their parents) visited the Orientation Expo in the Goergen Athletic Center’s Field House.

The long and winding road that leads to the dorms starts at Park Lot.

The long and winding road that leads to the dorms starts at Park Lot.

Members of the Pep Band sold plants outside of Wilson Commons.

Members of the Pep Band sold plants outside of Wilson Commons.

Freshmen couldn't wait to get Rocky's autograph.

Freshmen couldn’t wait to get Rocky’s autograph.

Java's gave out hundreds of free cups of coffee, lemonade, tee and iced coffee.

Java’s gave out hundreds of free cups of coffee, lemonade, tee and iced coffee.

Freshman Rochelle Sun from sunny Southern California is eager to get started in college.

Freshman Rochelle Sun from sunny Southern California is eager to get started in college.

The Buzz is back: Let the storytelling begin

Greetings, everyone.

Ready to begin another great academic year on the River Campus?

This is the first of what we hope will be many editions of The Buzz – a blog written FOR students and BY students.

We want to hear your exciting story ideas. Got a great event coming up? Win an award? Taking a unique course? Or maybe you just have some amazing photos of campus life you’d like to see posted.

Let us know. We’d love to share it with the University of Rochester community.

buzzfoto

Student Life Press Officer Jim Mandelaro and junior Joy Bian will be your source for news around campus as editors of The Buzz.

 

Here’s a brief look at who we are:

 JIM MANDELARO, editor of The Buzz: Jim joined the University in June after two-plus decades as a sportswriter at the Democrat and Chronicle.

He won three New York State Associated Press Awards for feature sports writing (beating out the New York Times!) and is the author of three books: Silver Seasons: The Story of the Rochester Red Wings; Silver Seasons and a New Frontier; and Outside The Game: A Collection of Inspirational Sports Stories.

He is the Student Life Press Officer on campus, in charge of publicizing the great people and events going on at the University of Rochester’s River Campus.

 Jim reports:

“I’m excited to get The Buzz off and running. This is a community with endless great stories, and with your help we will tell those stories. I am also looking for students who like to write or take photographs and want to contribute to The Buzz. Please let me know if you are interested. You can also send me writing or photo samples to the email below.

“Let’s make this the best year ever for The Buzz!”

You can reach Jim at Jim.Mandelaro@Rochester.edu or at (585) 276-4061.

JOY BIAN, student editor of The Buzz: Joy is a junior majoring in digital media studies. She transferred to Rochester one year ago from Beijing. She was born in the southern part of China near Shanghai.

 Joy reports:

“Like most of my Chinese friends of the same age, I am the only child in my family due to the Family Planning Program that began in the 1980s. My father is a marketing director of a paper company. As long as he touches the paper and feels the texture, he knows the type of it. He is really an expert. My mother was an accountant before she retired.

“Our winter is cold but no one describes it as freezing or even brutal like it was in Rochester last winter. Though startled at first, I got used to it very quickly and started to enjoy the bubbly life of shoveling the snow every morning. My roommates and I regarded it as a morning exercise. Thirty-minutes shoveling exercise plus car cleaning drill, what else can be more efficient to work out your body? No running machine, no elliptical, no tennis court – a shovel and a snow brush, that’s all you need for keeping fit in winter.

“I fell in love with the video editing. That’s why I joined URTV last semester, filming student activities and editing the videos clips. I also took one of the most interesting courses in my life—Sound Design. I did my final project on dubbing for a movie trailer of Indiana Jones. I recorded the human voice, played the background music on digital keyboard and mixed the sound effects of bombing, shrieking and car crash, etc. After playing around with digital technologies, I became more and more interested in how information is shared nowadays via various communication platforms.

“Now I want to hear your marvelous experience and stories! No matter if it is on campus or off campus,we are excited to hear from you!  So are you ready to share with us?”

Joy can be reached at jbian4@u.rochester.edu

Best of luck as you begin your academic year. And remember: If someone you know is Buzz worthy, shoot us an email!

Jim & Joy

Video Feature: Class of 2015 Commencements

Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the College of Arts, Sciences & Engineering at the University of Rochester, held on May 17, 2015. Graduates gathered in Eastman Quadrangle with their families, friends and the faculty and administration of the University to celebrate the 165th commencement in the University’s history. The speaker for the occasion was Deborah Bial, Founder and President of The Posse Foundation.

Highlights from the commencement ceremony for the Eastman School of Music, held on May 17, 2015 in Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. The speaker for the occasion was Paul Burgett ’68E, ’72E (MA), ’76E (PhD), Vice President and Senior Advisor to the President at the University of Rochester, and former Dean of Students at Eastman.

 

“The Rockys” Celebrate Campus Leadership

Each spring, the Office of the Dean of Students and the Rochester Center for Community Leadership recognize undergraduate students and organizations that have made significant contributions to campus life. Nominated by faculty, staff, and peers, Student Life Award recipients represent diverse interests, talents, and accomplishments but are united in their strength in leadership, fervor for engagement in campus life, and their aim to be a positive influence on peers, all of which help the campus community become ever better.

rocky2rocky3

This year, the awards, also referred to as the “The Rockys,” went to 18 undergraduates and 4 student organizations. “I think the winners represent a large demographic that follows their passions and gives back to others in all sorts of ways,” said Ed Feldman, associate director of leadership programs at the Rochester Center for Community Leadership and chair of the selection committee. “With over 200 organizations on campus, students have the resources and capacity to be part of something bigger than just themselves,” he added.  Feldman believes that the leadership opportunities on campus provide students with a means to create and promote positive social change in the immediate community and beyond.

Friends, family, and colleagues of the honorees were invited to an intimate awards reception, which also was attended by University administrators and campus leaders. All the winning students and organizations received engraved glass trophies and certificates.

Active Minds was honored as this year’s Outstanding Student Organization.  For co-president Hayley Harnicher ’15, the most rewarding experience has been being able to watch Active Minds grow as a presence on campus through the expansion of its programming.  “Although we have done a lot, we cannot wait to continue the momentum we’ve gained to continue bringing impactful programming to our community; just as an example, this Wednesday, April 22nd, we will have our final event of the semester – the Garden of Hope,” said Harnicher.

This upcoming event will display 1,100 yellow pinwheels to represent the 1,100 college students who die by suicide every year.  Active Minds hopes that this will empower students to start conversations and break the silence in order to further mitigate rates of suicide on college campuses.

Madeline Freeman ‘15 received this year’s Simeon Cheatham Award for her service specific to the development of children.  Freeman worked as a research assistant in Laura Wray-Lake’s lab for optimal social development, and her background as a psychology major has driven her to provide aid to children with developmental disabilities.  “I’ve learned that a strengths-based approach to academic education and emotional welfare is really the most effective,” she said.

Freeman has been able to apply this knowledge through her service in music, art, and movement therapy for children at the Mt. Hope Family Center, Hochstein School of Music, and the Boston Center. “I enjoyed putting what I learned in lab in action through service.”  Looking forward, Freeman hopes to pursue a career in clinical psychology.

 

Individual Awards:

Stephaun   Magnifique   Adil

Andrew Fried Prize: Stephaun Ward

Established by friends and family in 1961 in memory of Andrew Norman Fried, class of 1961. This prize is awarded to the man who, upon completion of his freshman year, has shown outstanding qualities of character, superior moral judgment, and interest in serving his fellow students.

Delno Sisson Prize: Magnifique Nsengimana

In 1957, this award was established by a gift from Delno Sisson, class of 1966. This prize is awarded annually to the freshman who has shown the most improvement not only in academic work, but also in adjusting to college life and the student body.

Award for Freshman Leadership: Adil Ali

This award recognizes an exceptional man or woman of the freshman class who has motivated his or her fellow classmates to become actively involved in the campus community.

Elizana   Arnold   Wier

Eli & Mildred Sokol Prize: Elizana-Marie Joseph

This award was established in 1985 by a gift from Eli and Mildred Sokol, class of 1933. This prize is awarded to a sophomore who has emerged as a leader who can be expected to contribute significantly to the welfare of his or her fellow students in the next two years.

Award for Campus Contributions: Abigail Arnold ‘16 and Ryan Wier ‘15

Two awards, one each presented to a junior and senior class member who has made significant contributions to the University community, including, but not limited to, campus life, academic achievement and leadership, and community service. The award winner will have promoted and demonstrated excellence in all aspects of their college experience.

David   Andrew   Alap

Seth H. & Harriet Terry Prize: David Markakis

Established in 1928 as a gift from Seth H. Terry, class of 1883, in memory of his parents. This award is given to the male member of the senior class who, by his industry, character and honorable conduct, has done the most for the life and character of the undergraduate community.

Percy Dutton Prize: Andrew Psarris

This prize was established in 1946 as a gift from Percy Dutton. This award is given to the male member of the graduating class who has excelled in “wholesome, unselfish and helpful influence” among his fellow students.

Award for Outstanding Fraternity and Sorority Leadership: Alap Patel

This award recognizes the positive contributions fraternities and sororities make to the campus community. It is awarded to a fraternity or sorority member who has led with integrity within their fraternal organization while also making significant contributions to the greater campus community.

Antoin   Duncan   alesa

Rob Rouzer Award for Excellence in Student Government Leadership: Antoinette Esce and Duncan Graham

Established in honor of his 28 years of service to the University of Rochester, the Rob Rouzer Award is conferred annually to a student affiliated with either of the three branches of the Students’ Association Government who has shown immense integrity and perseverance in striving to improve student life and welfare

Logan R. Hazen Award for Outstanding Contributions to Residential Life: Alesa Yuodsnukis

This award is given annually to the student who has “made significant contributions to the community and experience of students living in undergraduate residence halls. This student, through his or her actions, leadership, and innovation has promoted community through respect, fairness, and inclusion.”

Rachel   Rutul   Abhi

Award for Athletic Leadership: Rachel Honard

This award recognizes the positive contributions athletes make to the campus community. It is awarded to a student athlete who has demonstrated leadership within their club or varsity sport while also making significant contributions to other aspects of campus life.

Presidential Award for Community Service: Rutul Amin

Established by the Dean of Students in 1990 to recognize University students who are committed to community service. Given to a senior for outstanding participation and leadership in service to the community beyond the campus, this award recognizes a student who has worked selflessly and effectively in addressing social causes. Areas of focus include, but are not limited to, improving literacy, reducing hunger and hopelessness, providing legal or medical assistance to the needy, and serving as a mentor.

Entrepreneurship Award: Abhishek Sharma

The award for entrepreneurship is given to a student, or group of students, who has turned an idea into a venture that benefited others. The recipient will have demonstrated individual initiative and knowledge through awareness of markets and attention to the needs of others.

Anansa   Tori   Maddie

Michael Lowenstein Memorial Award: Anansa Benbow

This award, named for Michael Lowenstein, class of 1960 is presented to the University of Rochester River Campus undergraduate who deepens student, faculty, and community awareness of existing social, racial, or political inequities. This undergraduate through his/her words and actions has endeavored to promote the ideals which Michael cherished. Michael sought to give a fresh view of things around us, to focus upon issues, to probe deeply using fact and objectivity and to open a dialogue with the community to find some answers.

Transfer Student Award: Tori Saldivia

This award, recognizing the unique role of transfer students to the campus community, is given to a student who transferred with sophomore standing or above, and has completed a full year of study at the University. The recipient will have demonstrated a quick, successful, and seamless transition to the institution and will have taken full advantage of his or her time spent at the University.

Simeon Cheatham Award: Madeline Freeman

Established in the 1970s by the Office of the Dean of Students to recognize outstanding University of Rochester students. This award is given to a student who has outstanding qualities in devotion to community service and to growth and development of children.

SAIC

The Communal Principles Award: Students’ Association for Interfaith Cooperation (SAIC)

Established by the Office of the Dean of Students during the 2011-2012 academic year, this award is given annually to the student(s) or organization that best promote(s) the Communal Principals, as adopted by The College. These principles include Fairness, Freedom, Honesty, Inclusion, Respect, and Responsibility. One of these six principles will be highlighted annually and the recipient will have demonstrated qualities that exemplify the principles and/or created programming and activities related to this year’s Communal Principle: Inclusion.

Student Organization and Programming Awards:

Excellence in Programming: Eastman Freshman Class Council

This Excellence in Programming Award recognizes a student organization or group, either formal or informal, for its exceptional creativity, planning, and execution of a University program. Criteria upon which decisions are based include appeal to a broad cross-section of the University community, originality, and participation by members of the organization during all phases of the effort.

Outstanding Student Organization Award: Active Minds

Awarded to a student organization that has gone beyond the bounds of their membership by helping to create a positive campus environment for all students.

Award for Excellence in Creative Co-Sponsorship: Sigma Delta Tau Sorority

Established in 2004, the Award recognizes a program that was co-sponsored by a minimum of two organizations or groups. The cosponsored program should have been a new effort, one that brought together different facets of campus, and which served to build and strengthen the campus community.

Senior honors thesis breaks barriers

“Family, Professors, and society are pressuring you to do well [in college], whatever that means, but from ages 18 to 22, you’re also developing tremendously; the brain doesn’t stop developing our behavior until age 25. This is a very crucial part of our lives, but no one talks about it.”

Marz Saffore ’15 sought to rethink convention and challenge the status quo with her senior honors thesis show, “Erasing Hierarchies.” Saffore said, “I wanted to create a space where people felt they could talk about [differences], but not feel like they were alone in talking about it… I created a project where everyone was talking about it.” As one of the subjects of the film, attending the premier certainly prompted me to reconsider many of the ideas I previously had about the way I interact with others. Based on the reactions of those in the audience, this reaction was widely shared. Overall, “Erasing Hierarchies” was a keen-eyed tour de force; a window into what deeply unites humanity in spite of our external differences.

According to Saffore, seeing last year’s honors senior thesis show, by Lauren Blair ’13/T5, inspired her to undertake one of her own. Blair revived the program’s honors track, which involves taking three extra classes in the Art and Art History Department, and writing a 15-page paper, in addition to the honors thesis exhibition. Saffore decided the summer after she saw Blair’s show to switch onto the honors track. “In the summertime, I emailed my adviser,” Saffore recalled, “I told her, ‘I want to switch over, right now!’ Then I did, and as of right now, the honors program is officially revived; there’s someone else in the Class of 2016 who’s doing it.”

Saffore had some experience in digital media production from her work on a similar film chronicling her experience with Art New York, as well as from coursework.  During her semester in New York City, she honed her interview style, and learned to use b-roll, or stock footage. Assigned to make a podcast about her experience, she decided to include a visual element, and produced a short documentary about how four students “all come together and actually have a cool, meaningful semester, besides the whole surface level thing.” Returning to Rochester last fall, she wanted to use the same skills to show how students at the U of R are all striving for fulfillment of the same basic needs. A psychology minor, Saffore recalled Maslow’s hierarchy as a useful framework for organizing her film.

“Erasing Hierarchies” consisted of clips from 53 interviews with undergraduates from various walks of life.  These clips were edited together and displayed on a three-panel screen. Saffore consciously sought to maintain thematic unity, yet juxtaposed interview clips from students representing different positions within the same societal hierarchies. Another important guiding principle was to stay true each students’ experiences by accurately portraying their genuine emotions. Structurally, the film was organized into eight segments; each centered around one representative student, with smaller segments interspersed. This style created an attitude that all the film’s subjects were more similar than different, and many were going through the same fundamental struggles, whether they realized it or not. According to Saffore, it was difficult to edit out 99% of each of her 50+ 45-60 minute interviews, to a final length of 30 minutes, but the results truly speak for themselves.

The premier was followed by a Q & A session with the artist and a reception at the Sage Art Center featuring two performance art pieces. The first was an opportunity for the subjects of the documentary and audience members to interview Marz, asking her insightful, revealing personal questions which were all caught on camera, just like the interviews featured in the film. The second was a dance party. This reporter truly enjoyed it, and would highly recommend a trip to Sage Art Center to see an exhibit including the film, and various production notes and full interviews.

Schomburg Center of Black Culture director to deliver MLK Keynote

WHO: Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, will deliver the University of Rochester’s 2015 Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Address.

COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS: 6 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 23, Strong Auditorium on the River Campus. There will be a Q&A session at the end of Dr. Muhammad’s talk. The event is free and open to the public.

ABOUT KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD: Khalil Gibran Muhammad is the director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a Harlem-based branch of the New York Public Library. Muhammad is a former professor of history at Indiana University and served as the associate editor of the Journal of American History. He is the author of The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, published by Harvard University Press, which won the 2011 John Hope Franklin Best Book award in American Studies.

Muhammad is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers University, where he earned his PhD in history.

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Address was instituted in 2001 to promote issues of diversity, freedom, civil rights and social justice.

Please visit www.rochester.edu/diversity/celebrations/blackhistory

Spirit of old Vienna returns at 29th annual Viennese Ball

WHAT: The University of Rochester’s Ballroom Dancing Club will bring dancing and mystery to the River Campus with this year’s masquerade themed Annual Viennese Ball. The event is open to the public.

TIME, DATE, PLACE: 8 p.m. to midnight on Saturday, Oct. 25, in the May Room, located on the 4th floor of Wilson Commons, on the University of Rochester’s River Campus.

ABOUT: Students, faculty and community members join together to don their formal attire and masks to dance the night away at the annual Viennese Ball, sponsored by the University of Rochester’s Ballroom Dancing Club. At 7 p.m., a complimentary crash course in Viennese waltz will take place for those who would like to learn or brush up their skills before the ball. The event will commence at 8 p.m. and includes live performances from a string quartet of Eastman School musicians, a local Rochester dance troupe, and the Argentinian tango club. A contest will also take place for the best dressed dancer, and the winner will be rewarded with a free lesson series from the Ballroom Dancing Club.

TICKETS: Tickets are available at the Common Market in Wilson Commons. Tickets are $12 for University students, $15 for University faculty, staff and graduate students and $18 for the general public. Masks will be available for sale at the door for $2.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Email urballroom@gmail.com or call Common Connection at 585.275.5911