Rochester Alum Builds Youth Engagement at Community Health Center

By Caitlin Mack ’12(T5)
Univ. Communications

Last August, Alykhan Alani ’12 (T5) joined the newly-established adolescent health care team at Anthony Jordan’s Woodward Health Center to address the increasing need for care among youth ages 10 to 19 in Rochester’s Southwest quadrant—an initiative that Alani is helping to spearhead through research and outreach efforts.

“We’re looking to the existing literature and conducting our own research to determine the specific health care needs and barriers to care for youth who live or attend school in the Southwest quadrant,” says Alani. “The goal is to better implement and market services we already offer, and expand our efforts where the need in the community is currently unmet.”

According to a 2011 youth risk behavior survey commissioned by the Rochester City School District, the number of students who regularly saw a primary care provider was around 69 percent. “The importance of preventative primary care for adolescents and their families cannot be overstated,” Alani explains. “What makes Woodward an integral and unique member of this community is that we are committed to meeting our patients’ needs regardless of their ability to pay.”

Alani is one of six fellows currently participating in Rochester Youth Year (RYY), an AmeriCorps VISTA-sponsored program that places recent graduates in community-based organizations for one year to create or expand initiatives addressing various challenges facing youth and families in Rochester. Graduates of Rochester Regional Network colleges, a consortium of seven institutions of higher education in the Rochester-area, are invited to apply to the program, which is based at the Rochester Center for Community Leadership (RCCL) at the University of Rochester.

Through the RYY program, Alani works alongside primary care providers at Woodward to analyze the health needs of youth residing in the 19th Ward and Plymouth-Exchange neighborhoods and build capacity for the implementation of youth programs and services there. Beyond meeting patients’ needs in a clinical setting, Alani also helps link youth to a variety of services, including HSE (high school equivalency) prep, tutoring and afterschool programs, access to food pantries, temporary housing, and conflict resolution workshops.

“Affordable, quality health care is a real need just about everywhere, but especially in this community,” says Alani. “Socio-economic status has profound implications for health and longevity. While we work in a dynamic and vibrant community, we must remain cognizant of the economic marginalization this community has, and continues to endure.”

DSC_0469Alani also conducts ethnographic research that seeks to understand and address non-biological determinants of health. “While we need to meet the immediate need for healthcare in our community, this effort cannot be divorced from the on-going struggle for economic, social, and environmental justice,” he explains. “When we begin to conceptualize interpersonal violence, addiction, housing and food insecurity, interpersonal and institutional racism, and even residential and business zoning as public health issues that affect our collective welfare, we’re confronted with an opportunity to address these challenges in unique and meaningful ways. Social determinants of health are often circumstantially or environmentally imposed on people–mitigating them requires us to continually chip-away at structural inequalities by not only interrogating the ways power and privilege operate in our own lives but also seeking to engage these structures at the institutional and policy-making levels.”

Alani also was brought on to strengthen the health center’s relationship with various youth-oriented community organizations operating in the Southwest quadrant, such as the M.K Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, Teen Empowerment, Rochester Youth Outreach, the Boys and Girls club, schools such as Wilson Commencement Academy and School 29, recreation centers, and faith-based institutions. He conducts focus groups with staff, volunteers, and youth from these partner organizations to ascertain their perspective on healthcare and facilitates the establishment of referral and enrollment networks.

Alani’s passion for community health and desire to live and work in Rochester after graduation was sparked the summer after his sophomore year while working at Anthony Jordan Health Center on Hudson Avenue as part of Rochester’s Urban Fellows Program. “That was my first experience with on-the-ground community health work, which fueled my desire to explore career opportunities within Rochester’s nonprofit sector,” he says.
Alani has maintained ties to Rochester’s public health program through his efforts at Woodward, hosting undergraduate research interns Alyssa Teck ’15 in the fall and Jenna Kole ’14 in the spring. Both were enrolled in Dr. Nancy Chin’s community engagement class.

“I firmly believe that service-learning initiatives allow students to have an engaging and meaningful experience with the Rochester community beyond shopping and nightlife. It can really change one’s perspective on this city,” he says. “Investing institutional resources into service learning programs and expanding the role of campus institutions like the Rochester Center for Community Leadership and University-affiliated partners like the Gandhi Institute is vital to fully realizing not only our commitment to Rochester, but our cherished and sanguine motto, Meliora.”

Last year, Alani completed a Take 5 project studying social capital and community development, which solidified his interests in grassroots and community organizing and non-profit work. He graduated last May with a bachelor’s in international health and society and minors in gender and women’s studies and religion. As an undergraduate, Alani was involved with RCCL, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), MetroJustice, and the Gandhi Institute (where he currently serves as a board member). After he completes his Rochester Youth Year fellowship in August, he plans on continuing to pursue a career in community health work and activism.

Those interested in applying to the 2014-15 Rochester Youth Year Program can apply here. The application deadline is Friday, March 7.

In the Photo: Attendees and speakers at a recent Woodward youth night.

UR Students Highlighted for MLK Volunteering Efforts

On Saturday, across the city of Rochester, RochesterCares’ “King for a Day” project brought groups of students and community members together to participate in service activities. University of Rochester students took part in a number of different projects, including cleaning up the community garden at the M.K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence on South Plymouth Avenue and setting up luminaries around the neighborhood for the holiday.  At the Rochester Museum and Science Center, U of R students helped run the YMCA sponsored Martin Luther King Jr. Day events, which brought over 300 children from grades K-6 to participate in activities related to the holiday.

UR students also visited the Hickok Center for Brain Injury, Volunteers of America Children’s Center, Monroe-Rochester Youth Bureau as well as taking part in outdoor cleanup. Their volunteer activities have been highlighted by both the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle and by WROC-TV. You can read more about the “King for a Day” project at RochesterCares’ website.

The Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebrations continue Friday Jan. 24th, when Benjamin Todd Jealous, the youngest president in the history of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, will deliver the University of Rochester’s 2014 Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Address. The free talk begins at 6 p.m. in Strong Auditorium on the River Campus. You can read more about the event here.

Photo courtesy of Rochester Museum and Science Center.

Summer Plans Series: Pianos for Peace Makes a Joyful Noise

By Rei Ramos ’15
University Communications

August marks a very musical month for the streets of Rochester, thanks to a community arts project led by a UR undergrad. In 11 different locations around the city, pianos have been placed in parks and public spaces as part of an outdoor music installation led by Marissa Balonon-Rosen ’14. The project, Pianos for Peace, works to provide the public with access to the arts and serves as an outlet for Balonon-Rosen to promote ideas of nonviolence within the community.

A Rochester native, Balonon-Rosen was able to take piano lessons through the Rochester City School District at a young age, an opportunity that was not available to many. As such, she was also familiar with the issues plaguing her local community. “I was raised in Rochester and really experienced many of the issues that it has had with violence,” she explains. Now a dual degree  student enrolled at both Eastman and the River Campus, she hopes to use this arts project as a vehicle to send a “message of peace” through music and community values. The pianos, which were all donated, were painted and decorated with different messages and interpretations of peace by local youth and artists.

Balonon-Rosen drew inspiration from similar outdoor piano installations that she found while abroad in Paris. From this initial idea, she was also able to incorporate aspects of her dual degree to provide the foundations for this project.  Having found great value in music and the arts as a piano major at Eastman, she was likewise driven by a desire to promote nonviolence, as evidenced by her pursuit of Urban Youth Studies – a major that she created through a mix of classes in anthropology, psychology, education, and religion among others.

The project was made possible through the collaborative efforts of multiple local organizations, such as the University of Rochester, the Eastman School of Music, the

Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, and the Rochester City School District – all organizations that Balonon-Rosen has worked with or experienced first-hand. When asked about the workload required to spearhead this project, she was quick to acknowledge its difficulty. “It took a lot of coordination,” she admits; charged with acquiring the pianos via donation, enlisting artists to paint them, as well as connecting with community members to find viable spaces for the installations, Balonon-Rosen had to spend a considerable amount of time and effort to make her plan into a reality. The installation series will continue until the end of August when the pianos will be moved to the Ghandi Institute for Nonviolence as a continuing community fixture to promote peace.

Balonon-Rosen believes that this project offers a positive vehicle of expression to the community. “For me, I see music as a way of bringing strangers together – bringing neighbors together – in a way that nothing else really can,” she explains. With this, the inclusion of dropboxes for suggestions with each piano gives the public the opportunity to reflect on how to better promote peace within the community. “Sometimes people have the idea, but don’t have the platform to share it,” explains Balonon-Rosen. For her, this project is all about starting a dialogue within the community in order to open up the idea for peace to both neighbors and strangers alike.

Balonon-Rosen2

This story is part of the Summer Plans Series, a collection of stories about how undergrads at the University of Rochester are spending their summer. Know of someone doing something cool over break? Email The Buzz (thebuzz@rochester.edu) and tell us all about it!

Program Inspires Rochester Student to ‘Pay It Forward’

By Joseph Bailey ’15
Univ. Communications

When asked why she’s here at the University of Rochester today, Abigail Gonzalez ’16 will most likely reply that were it not for New Pathways for Youth she’d probably still be back in her hometown, Phoenix, Ariz.  It’s because of programs like this that troubled youths can beat the odds and attend institutions of higher learning like Rochester.  Gonzalez comes from a family of modest means, and throughout junior high and high school depended on the counsel of her mentor, Ellen Dean, assigned by the program. Dean would help her with homework, career searching, and networking.  A poster child for the program’s success, Gonzalez was invited to return to Phoenix in February to serve as a guest speaker at the organization’s annual breakfast.

The program has undergone several name changes in the time Gonzalez has been involved in it, both as a mentee and as a returning alumna. First, it was called Arizona Quest for Kids, was later named Phoenix Youth at Risk, until program administrators settled on New Pathways for Youth, taking out the word “risk” altogether.

It’s programs like New Pathways for Youth that allow bright young minds like Gonzalez to flourish and do real good in the world. Like many students at Rochester, she came in with the mindset of becoming a doctor, but also like many students, came to the realization that pre-med was not for her. Now a business major, she has aspirations to begin a foundation. Right now, she enjoys the small, personal, diverse environment of the U of R. Her favorite class is Spanish. She feels that in spite of her Latino heritage, she never really learned to read and write Spanish well, and now she has an excellent opportunity to change that. Gonzalez participates in several undergraduate councils, including SUBS and MAPS, and is an active member of PAWS. Around campus, you might run into her working at the counter at Hillside Market.

When Gonzalez returned to Phoenix, she represented both the University of Rochester and the influential program that got her here. It wouldn’t be the least bit surprising to learn that in 10 or 20 years, she has established a new foundation for troubled youth, coming full circle from being on the verge of trouble herself.

Oladoyin Oladeru ’13 Leads Nonviolence Program for Middle Schoolers

By Caitlin Mack ’12 (T5)
Univ. Communications

Last year, Oladoyin Oladeru ’13 mentored middle school students about the benefits of nonviolence during in-school suspension hours and decided he wanted to create an after school program of a similar nature.  With help from the M.K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence and fellow University of Rochester undergraduates, Oladeru established the Young Men at Peace program last fall.  The program allows 6th, 7th, and 8th grade male students at Dr. Charles Lunsford School #19 the unique opportunity to explore a wide range of important issues related to nonviolence.

Oladeru is one of five students chosen to be a 2012-20130 Meliora Leader, a new community service initiative through the Rochester Center for Community Leadership (RCCL). Meliora Leaders create individualized service projects, allowing them to exercise intensive leadership in the Rochester community for an extended period of time. The program benefits organizations and individuals in need while providing a substantial learning experience for the students involved.

The topics addressed in Young Men at Peace are meant to inform the middle schoolers about the power of nonviolent self-transformation to overcome physical and mental obstacles. This includes awareness of positive lifestyle choices and social interactions, how to become better advocates against community and school violence, and learning about social justice heroes like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Gandhi.

In addition to Oladeru, other Young Men at Peace undergraduate mentors include Milan Byrdwell ’14, Reginald Hooks ’15, Shaquill McCullers ’14, Michael Mobarak ’15, Carl Parker ’13, and Taurean Parker ’13. All six undergraduates, whom Oladeru gathered before the start of the program last fall, serve as a source of inspiration for the students.

“We want to make the dream of obtaining a college education more attainable by showing them young men from the U of R who are living proof,” says Oladeru.

George Payne, who works at the Gandhi Institute as a Peace and Justice Educator and helps oversee the program, applauds Oladeru’s “vision and dedication,” for allowing the students involved to form “meaningful bonds with mentors in college who know about their challenges and believe in their potential.”  Echoing Payne’s praise is Principal Eva Thomas, who has called the Young Men at Peace program a “blessing” to her school.

Oladeru exercises his own life experiences while serving as a nonviolence ambassador to the young males of School # 19.  Oladeru moved from Lagos, Nigeria to the United States when he was nine years old and lived in the Bronx until college.  Around the age of the students he now mentors, Oladeru was bullied for being foreign, African, and studious. A personal “turning point” that alerted him to the importance of nonviolence occurred in 6th grade when his friend got shot on his way home after school.

“Mentorship is really important, especially at a young age,” says Oladeru. “I remember giving into peer pressure when I came to this country and I think this is an issue most prevalent with young males at that age.  It’s not enough to have two parents at home because they can’t relate and there’s only so much they can understand.”

Oladeru, who is set to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in epidemiology this May, is a McNair Scholar, a Ronald McDonald scholar, a Gilman Scholar, and a Gates Millennium Scholar.  In addition to being a Meliora Leader, he works at Carlson Library and is a Resident Advisor.  He hopes to get a master’s and doctoral degree in epidemiology and conduct population-based research in cardiovascular disease.

Oladeru has high hopes for the future of the program because the young male participants have noticeably progressed as a result of the efforts of Oladeru, his fellow UR mentors, and the Gandhi Institute.  The number of attendees has been steadily increasing and Oladeru aims for a total of 15 boys that come on a regular basis. He also hopes to plan field trips to the U of R campus, Foodlink, and Darien Lake to teach them about rules in different social settings and inspire them to be respectful no matter where you are.

“To see someone with a similar background having made it goes a long way,” says Oladeru. “The greatest joy for me is that I got people interested in volunteering who really care. We go back every week and it makes a difference.”

This article is part two of a series that features the Meliora Leaders of 2012-2013. Undergraduates interested in participating in the program should look for information on the RCCL page in the coming months. Information about the program can be found on the RCCL page at http://rochester.edu/college/rccl/meliora.html.

In the photos: Photo 1: Oladoyin Oladeru with one of the young men in his program. Photo 2: Oladoyin Oladeru and a group of University of Rochester undergraduate mentors teach male students from Dr. Charles Lunsford School #19 about the benefits of nonviolence.

Meet Samantha Whalen: Meliora Leader

By Caitlin Mack ’12 (T5)
Univ. Communications

Though only a sophomore, Samantha Whalen ’15 has managed to effectively find a  real-world application for her majors in anthropology and health, behavior & society and complement her interests in peer health advocacy and community outreach. As a participant in the Meliora Leaders Program, Whalen was given the opportunity to volunteer at the Sojourner House, a transitional housing program for homeless women and children located in the 19th ward community. There, she helps residents plan and cook healthy, nutritious meals.

For the 2012-2013 academic year, five Rochester students, including Whalen, were selected as inaugural participants in the Meliora Leaders program. Designed to support and incentivize community-based leadership among Rochester students, the new initiative is a part of the Rochester Center for Community Leadership (RCCL).

In addition to serving as publicity chair of the Refugee Student Alliance on campus and volunteering as a part of community service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega, Whalen will spend the year running a local community service project, embodying the University motto by “seeking to ameliorate the Rochester community.”

In exchange for 300 hours of service throughout the academic year, leaders receive supplemental funding through AmeriCorps, which is matched by the University of Rochester. Participants undergo leadership training, keep in contact with a member of the host organization where the service is performed, and receive regular advisement by faculty or staff at the College.

“The program benefits organizations and individuals in need in Rochester, but also provides a substantive learning experience for our students,” says Glenn Cerosaletti, director of Rochester Center for Community Leadership. “Students stand to gain a keener understanding of the Rochester community—both its needs and assets—and make lasting connections with particular individuals in the community. At the same time, I hope they will gain an understanding of project management and how to enact social change.”

Whalen’s host organization, the Sojourner House, provides shelter for roughly 16 women at a time and any children they may have. The women living in the house must complete assigned chores, attend life skills programs that help them find jobs, and sometimes undergo counseling and therapy for issues like drug and alcohol addiction. Women and their families usually stay around six months, which is preferred to secure living arrangements, although stays vary from one month to more than a year.

At the house, Whalen noticed that women usually pooled their food stamps and resources to prepare ‘comfort’ foods, which were often unhealthy. She has been working with the life skills coordinator at the house to plan healthy meals, make shopping lists, organize the kitchen so the women have better access to adequate cooking supplies, and provide advice on healthy portion sizes. She also suggests simple recipes with varied and interesting ingredients and tries to make them as healthy and nutritious as possible while staying within budget.

“The women go back to the same things that they grew up making, which is fine every once in awhile, but it’s about teaching them and their children how to live a healthier lifestyle,” Whalen explains.

Examples of healthy meals that Whalen helped plan include chicken pasta primavera, chicken stir fry, smoked pork chops with corn and okra, chicken asparagus crepes, turkey meatloaf, and chicken quesadillas.

Whalen especially appreciates her interactions with the children who live in the Sojourner House. In addition to biweekly visits to the house to help plan meals and improve overall nutrition, Whalen hosts a “study buddy” program on Tuesday nights, where she provides homework help to the kids who live there. The kids also participate in “Dream Seeds,” an arts enrichment program that has activities, including drumming and tap dancing. She says that talking and interacting with the children has given her a new perspective on Rochester outside of the microcosm of the River Campus.

“It’s eye-opening to interact with a different socioeconomic group. It helps me to understand Rochester more as a community,” Whalen explains. “There are two little girls that told me they aren’t allowed to play outside because there’s a criminal who lives on their street. Sojourner House is a place to go to feel safe and to do fun activities.”

A native of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., Whalen pursued this opportunity after hearing about it through Alpha Phi Omega and was in charge of finding her own project and contacts. Whalen posts monthly reflections on Blackboard so that RCCL staff can monitor her progress and make sure she stays on track.  She remains focused on maintaining a nutrition program and committed to helping the residents of the Sojourner House in any way that she can.

This article is part one of a series that will feature the Meliora Leaders of 2012-2013. Undergraduates interested in participating in the program should look for information on the RCCL page in Spring 2013. Information about the program can be found on the RCCL page at http://rochester.edu/college/rccl/meliora.html.

BPG, RCSD Students Take Center Stage

By Marissa Abbott ’14
Ballet Performance Group

On Friday, Nov. 16, students from the Dare to Dance outreach program lit up the stage at “Shake It Out,” the Ballet Performance Group’s annual fall show. Opening after intermission, the children, second and third grade students at Francis Parker School No. 23, performed a simple routine to “Good Time” by Owl City and Carly Rae Jepsen. The children’s energy radiated to the audience, resulting in an enthusiastic round of applause.

“The kids were just so cute.  Everyone in the audience loved their performance. I kept hearing rave reviews. The audience members couldn’t stop talking about how wonderful they were,” said junior Alyson Manning.

The Dare to Dance outreach program began in fall 2011, when BPG was looking to branch out and get involved within the Rochester community. The purpose of the program is to provide after school instruction in dance and creative movement. The program met weekly on Friday afternoons for eight weeks of instruction. This year, students were exposed to a variety of dance styles including ballet, jazz, contemporary, and creative movement. With 20 students participating in the program, things could get a little hectic sometimes, according to junior Lauren Sava.

“As much as I enjoyed working with the children, there were definitely challenges. Second and third graders can be very rambunctious, so finding constructive ways for the students to release their energy requires a lot of creative thinking,” said Sava.

Despite these challenges, the program was extremely rewarding for students. According to junior Marissa Abbott, students greeted her with bountiful energy and bubbling smiles every Friday afternoon. Abbott, who is a member of the executive board for BPG and serves as the Outreach Coordinator, is in charge of coordinating the Dare to Dance program. Along with a committee of five to six members, Abbott prepared lesson plans for each week, coordinated with the school staff and parents, and choreographed a routine for the students to perform in BPG’s fall show.

“I am so proud of these kids. They exceeded my expectations, bringing bright smiles and incredible energy to the stage, while remembering their routine very well,” said Abbott.  “This was an incredible experience, from which I learned a lot. To see the kids up on stage having a good time, that’s all that really matters to me. I’m glad that BPG is able to provide this program and that we can share our love for dance with the Rochester community. I can’t wait until next semester.”

Women’s Soccer Team, SMD Students Host Soccer Camp

By Melissa Greco Lopes
Univ. Communications

Members of the University of Rochester’s Varsity Women’s Soccer team spent the morning of Saturday, Sept. 29, sharing their knowledge of the sport with more than 90 young girls from around Rochester during the Girls Rule Soccer Clinic.  Designed to empower young girls and get them excited about playing soccer, the free event brought girls of varying levels of soccer experience to Fauver Stadium for a morning of shooting, passing, and juggling.

After they practiced a variety of drills, members of the women’s team coached participants as they put their new found skills to the test during mini scrimmages. Campus tours were offered after the clinic and participants were encouraged to return to campus in the afternoon to cheer on the varsity squad as they played Brandeis University in their first University Athletic Association game of the season.

The clinic was created by members of Grassroot Rochester, a student-driven initiative at the University’s School of Medicine and Dentistry that is committed to empowering and educating young people through participation in organized sports. Last spring, Grassroot Rochester member and third-year medical student Michael Barnes connected with student-athletes on the varsity soccer team, and Deon Rodgers, president of River Flow Soccer Club, to plan the first clinic. It drew nearly 35 girls from school districts across the area, including the Rochester City School District and Brighton Central School District. Barnes says the group intends to make the soccer clinics a sustainable effort that can be offered throughout the year, creating more opportunities for girls to play soccer.

Additional sponsors include the Department of Community & Preventative Medicine at URMC, which encourages medical school students to engage in community service activities, the undergraduate Office of Admissions and Financial Aid, MVP Healthcare, and the Athletics Department. To see more pictures from the camp, visit Grassroot Rochester on Facebook.

Article written by Melissa Greco Lopes, editor of The Buzz and student life publicist in University Communications. Photos courtesy of Michael Barnes, Grassroot Rochester.

UR Habitat Advocates for Homeless during Shack-A-Thon

By Alayna Callanan
Univ. Communications

This Friday, members of UR Habitat for Humanity will host their second annual Shack-A-Thon, spending a cold night outside of Wilson Commons in makeshift shacks created out of nothing but cardboard boxes and duck tape.

Shack-A-Thon is designed to promote awareness for the club and the widespread issue of homelessness. The event also serves as a fundraiser for Habitat’s Alternative Spring Break, where students travel to a different state to assist with a build in that area for the week.

Last year Shack-A-Thon’s roughly 50 participants raised more than $800, giving members the opportunity to travel to Goldsboro, N.C. where they stayed at a local church. While in Goldsboro, they built a shed, helped put up siding, and painted the house.

UR Habitat for Humanity shares Habitat International’s mission of eliminating poverty and homelessness worldwide through an active and conscious process for people to attain decent shelters. Through their affiliation with Flower City Habitat for Humanity, the University’s chapter participates in six local builds per year, helping to provide quality, safe, and affordable housing for Rochester natives in need. During the year, the chapter raises funds for builds, educates others about housing issues, volunteers at the Ronald McDonald House, and helps sort donated food at Foodlink.

This year, organizers would like to see even more funds raised through a greater number of participants in Shack-A-Thon, which begins at 5 p.m. Registration, which is $20 for teams of up to 8 people, includes six boxes and duct tape for building a shack, dinner, breakfast and coffee the next morning. Additional boxes cost $5 each and for every five boxes purchased the sixth box is free. Each team is required to keep at least one person in their shack at all times during the event, with the exception of viewing performances and speakers. Activities include board games, tie dye, and access to performances by the Yellowjackets, Midnight Ramblers, Louvre, and more!  This fun, philanthropic event is co-sponsored by UR Habitat for Humanity, WRUR, and the Recreational Ski and Snowboard Club.

In addition to Shack-A-Thon, there are several other ways students can contribute to UR Habitat, including donating money via cash, flex, credit, or check in Wilson Commons at their table. Through Monday, Oct. 1, UR’s chapter of Habitat also is participating in Barnes and Noble’s “Build a Future Challenge” on Facebook. Head to the University’s Barnes and Noble Facebook page and write a comment about Habitat, or like or share their challenge. The campus chapter that gets the most points wins a $1,000 donation.

Article written by Alayna Callanan ’14, an intern with University Communications.

In the Photo: Shack-A-Thon 2011 winners Casey Gould ’14 and Aaron Rusheen ’14 pose in their house.