35 Rochester Undergrads Present Research at National Conference

Univ. Communications – Thirty-five University of Rochester students have been selected to present their research at the National Conference of Undergraduate Research (NCUR). The annual conference will take place at Ithaca College from March 31 through April 2.

Founded in 1987, NCUR provides undergraduates from across the country the opportunity to share their independent, unique research with their peers and professors through presentations and poster sessions. This year, NCUR saw the most applications submitted for review in the conference’s history, with the total number reaching more than 3,500. About 83 percent of applicants were selected to present their research.

“NCUR is an exciting opportunity for our students to show off their research, network, and learn about work going on elsewhere,” says Steve Manly, a physics professor and the director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, which works with Rochester students applying for inclusion in the conference. “It’s fun for me to accompany them, in part, because Rochester students make a great showing with quality research and presentations.”

The following Rochester students were selected to present research:

  • Sarah Ackroyd ’11, a biochemistry and statistics major, will present her research paper titled pH regulation of ER Ca2+ release by recombinant InsP3 receptors in DT40-3KO cells
  • Ellie Adair ’11, English and philosophy major, The affective power of Edgar Allan Poe; Moving beyond sincerity and jest
  • Jacy Bulaon ’11, biomedical engineering major, Optimization of quantitative second harmonic generation imaging
  • Xiaowei Cai ’12, optics major, Analysis of the myopic shift from 4 to 12 weeks post descemet-stripping with automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK)
  • Isthier Chaudhury ’11, chemical engineering and Chinese studies major, Study of AgPt alloy nanoparticle loading on carbon supports
  • Gaoxiang Chen ’11, neuroscience and psychology major, Analysis of the propensity of neural epilepsy in a dynamic system
  • Rachel DeAngelis ’11, psychology major, Behind the computer screen: A study of cyber-antisocial behavior
  • Paul Del Prato ’12, brain and cognitive science major, The cumulative semantic cost occurs pre-lexically
  • Josh Geller ’11, physics and mathematics major, Search for an entanglement measure for three- and four-orbit states via phase symmetry
  • Serene Habayeb ’11, brain and cognitive science major, An investigation of mental state attribution and social impairment in children with autism
  • Alexander G. Hajduczok ’11, biochemistry major, Mapping antagonist contact points on the Ste2 G-protein coupled receptor in saccharomyces cereviseae
  • Julian E. Herwitz ’13, computer science major, Transactional memory applications of Delaunay’s triangulation algorithm
  • Woong Hwang ’11, neuroscience major, Spindle check point targeted therapy for glioblastoma
  • Huan “Colin” Jiang ’12, financial economics, computer science, and mathematics/statistics major, Operations research based on the performance-management strategy
  • Angela D. Ketterer ’12, biomedical engineering major, Design and implementation of a behavioral apparatus for auditory research in birds
  • Joel Kim ’13, microbiology major, Investigating the effects of class II ribonucleotide reductase on adenovirus replication
  • Sharese King ’12, linguistics major, On the interplay of syntax and pragmatics: Evidence from representational NPs and ellipsis
  • Nate Lindsey ’11, alternate energy and sustainable engineering major, Continental rifting above a mantle superplume: Diffuse vs. localized plate deformation in eastern Africa
  • Seri Link ’12, English literature and mathematics major, Modeling respiratory cilia movement
  • Zachery Lynch ’11, ecology and evolutionary biology major, Interactions between bacterial endosymbionts in Drosophila Neotestacea
  • Gerad Markham ’13, psychology and philosophy major, Examining the buffering hypothesis: The moderation of stress and distress by the perception of available support in postnatal low-income women
  • Victoria Masse ’11, anthropology and African and African-American studies major, Cultural trauma and genetics: The “new” African American in our midst
  • Tim McCrossen ’11, mechanical engineering, Structural analysis of an unreinforced Roman concrete vault: The frigidarium of the Baths of Caracalla
  • Kyle Murray ’12, computer science major, FlashDOM: Enabling blind people to browse more of the web
  • Christine Pittman ’11, archaeology, technology, and historical structures major, Case study of cobblestone masonry in Orleans County, New York
  • Yang Ran ’12, pre-med major, Analysis of microRNA expression in recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation
  • Sneha Rath ’12, molecular genetics major, Characterization of a novel gene, CG3313 – as a potential E3 ubiquitin ligase complex binding protein – that regulates growth and apoptosis through the insulin signaling pathway and Exploring the influence of endocytosis on aging in C. elegans
  • Jennifer Roach ’11, economics and international relations major, Unemployment in Spain: A comparative analysis
  • Sean Rodrigues ’12, chemical engineering major, Cationic substitution of hydroxyapatite for hydrogen fuel cell application
  • Lauren Schleider ’12, studio art and anthropology major, Social control and sanction: A bodily exploration
  • Amelia Stone ’11, mathematics major, The Cayley Knot
  • Stephen Supoyo ’11, molecular genetics major, Lifespan extension by preserving somatic stem cell function and tissue homeostasis in the Drosophila intestine
  • Evan Wormsbecher ’11, classics and psychology major, The gospel according to Juvencus: How a 4th century poet created a “new” epic paradigm
  • Aaron Zakrzewski ’11, mechanical engineering major, Natural frequencies of bubbles within rigid and compliant tubes
  • Ting “Johnny” Zheng ’12, biomedical engineering major, Modeling of inflammation of cerebral vasculature caused by methamphetamine and HIV