VPG Medical featured in Rochester Business Journal

University of Rochester start-up, VPG Medical, was recently featured in the Rochester Business Journal:

Among the companies in the Luminate NY accelerator, VPG Medical Inc. is a bit unique.

While most companies in the accelerator are based around developing hardware products in the optics, photonics and imaging space, VPG is a software company, developing a platform that can be used with built-in smartphone, tablets and computer cameras. In a software atmosphere where virtually every possible use of a phone’s capabilities has been explored, it’s tough to imagine what kind of tech a company could produce to put them in the largest optics accelerator in the world without even having a physical product.

That is, until founder and CEO Jean-Phillippe Couderc explains just what they do.

“What is quite amazing about this technology is that it uses the embedded camera from the smart devices to capture the electrical activity of the heart,” Couderc said. “It actually detects subtle changes in the color of your skin that occurs each time your heart beats.”

Read the full feature here.

Handy Gelbard Authors STAT News Piece Touting Multi-Target Drugs

Precision medicine is saving lives, but Harris A. (Handy) Gelbard, director of Center for Neurotherapeutics Discovery at URMC, believes we’re overlooking another class of extremely important treatment candidates: multi-target drugs. In STAT News, he shares his views on why U.S.-based pharmaceutical companies should pay closer attention to these drugs—including a promising compound discovered right here at URMC.

Read the full article here. 

Startup Company Aims to Improve Music Education

Learning a musical instrument requires dedication, practice, and time. Making performance errors is a natural part of the learning process; however, learning delays can occur when errors go uncorrected during individual practice. A recently established startup company, Shenzhen Mango Future Education Technology Co (Mango Future), has developed a product to address this problem.

Mango Future aims to improve and revolutionize the way people learn to play musical instruments. The company’s first product is Lian – a smartphone-application-based intelligent assistant for instrument practicing. The application, which is based on core technologies developed by University of Rochester Professor Zhiyao Duan, can listen to and track a musician’s performance on the score in real time, providing feedback on pitch and rhythm accuracy. The University licensed the rights to that technology to Mango Future.

The smartphone application enables the student to identify and correct errors as they practice and is intended to supplement musical instruction. Currently, the application is available to users in China and the United States. The company intends to expand its application to other string instruments, and eventually to brass and wood instruments.

Read more and download the application here.

Registration Open for Small Business Owners Boot Camp

The Ain Center for Entrepreneurship’s Buzz Lab Boot Camp: Four Saturdays for a Better Business is accepting applications for its second cohort. Designed for entrepreneurs, small business owners and aspiring innovators from the Greater Rochester community, the series of interactive workshops will run Saturdays, February 9, 16, 23, and March 2 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the River Campus. Accepted applicants will receive scholarships provided through a grant from the Economic Development Administration within the US Department of Commerce. The cost to participate is $25 and includes lunch for all four Saturdays. Those who complete the program will receive a certificate from the University. View the brochure and register online by February 6.