6 February 09 | Chad W. Post

The Best Translated Book of 2008 Award Party will take place on Thursday, February 19th from 7 to 9:00pm, and you’re all invited.

We’re having the party at Melville House Books at 145 Plymouth St. in Brooklyn. (To get there take the F train to York Street, the first stop in Brooklyn.)

Francisco Goldman will be hosting the event, and will announce the fiction and poetry winners for 2008. (The complete list of finalists is below.) We’ll also have appetizers and drinks . . .

If you think you’re going to make it, please RSVP either at the Facebook page or by e-mailing me at chad.post at rochester dot edu. (You don’t need to RSVP to get in, but we’d really like to have some idea of how many people will be there . . . This is going to be a lot of fun.)

Fiction Finalists:

Tranquility by Attila Bartis
translated from the Hungarian by Imre Goldstein
(Archipelago)

2666 by Roberto Bolaño
translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

Nazi Literature in the Americas by Roberto Bolaño
translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews
(New Directions)

Voice Over by Céline Curiol
translated from the French by Sam Richard
(Seven Stories)

The Darkroom of Damocles by Willem Frederik Hermans
translated from the Dutch by Ina Rilke
(Overlook)

Yalo by Elias Khoury
translated from the Arabic by Peter Theroux
(Archipelago)

Senselessness by Horacio Castellanos Moya
translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver
(New Directions)

Unforgiving Years by Victor Serge
translated from the French by Richard Greeman
(New York Review Books)

Bonsai by Alejandro Zambra
translated from the Spanish by Carolina De Robertis
(Melville House)

The Post-Office Girl by Stefan Zweig
translated from the German by Joel Rotenberg
(New York Review Books)

Poetry Finalists:

Essential Poems and Writings by Robert Desnos
translated from the French by Mary Ann Caws, Terry Hale, Bill Zavatsky, Martin Sorrell, Jonathan Eburne, Katherine Connelly, Patricia Terry, and Paul Auster
(Black Widow)

You Are the Business by Caroline Dubois
translated from the French by Cole Swensen
(Burning Deck)

As It Turned Out by Dmitry Golynko
translated from the Russian by Eugene Ostashevsky, Rebecca Bella, and Simona Schneider
(Ugly Duckling)

For the Fighting Spirit of the Walnut by Takashi Hiraide
translated from the Japanese by Sawako Nakayasu
(New Directions)

Poems of A.O. Barnabooth by Valery Larbaud
translated from the French by Ron Padgett & Bill Zavatsky
(Black Widow)

Night Wraps the Sky by Vladimir Mayakovsky
translated from the Russian by Katya Apekina, Val Vinokur, and Matvei Yankelevich, and edited by Michael Almereyda
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

A Different Practice by Fredrik Nyberg
translated from the Swedish by Jennifer Hayashida
(Ugly Duckling)

EyeSeas by Raymond Queneau
translated from the French by Daniela Hurezanu and Stephen Kessler
(Black Widow)

Peregrinary by Eugeniusz Tkaczyszyn-Dycki
translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston
(Zephyr)

Eternal Enemies by Adam Zagajewski
translated from the polish by Clare Cavanagh
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)


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