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Undergraduate Advising

Advising Week (x2)

Peer advising

October 21 through November 1st.

Each semester, during the weeks prior to registration, a number of special events are held so that students can meet with faculty, learn about academic opportunities, and prepare for registration.

Students are encouraged to:

  • Attend departmental events and advising office hours.
  • Meet with your Undergraduate Advisors
  • Review information on this website and CDCS
  • Meet with Advisors, Peer Advisors and/or First-Year Fellows to further discuss academic plans and connecting to academic resources.

Sophomores, we ask you to begin the steps to declare your major during this time. Please visit the link to learn more about the steps to declare your major.

Events

Advising Week events include departmental advising hours, a humanities-focused advising session with faculty from a number of disciplines, interest meetings, and the Undergraduate Research Fair. See the department/program advising information below for the specific opportunities and events.

Registration Dates and Times

Registration for the fall 2019 semester opens on Monday, November 4.

For more specific registration information see the registration schedule. Please note: this schedule will be updated during the month of March to have dates for the Fall Semester.

Peer Advising

In addition to meeting with your advisor, we encourage you to contact departmental peer advisors with questions you might have. Peer advisors can help with course selection, major declaration, and more. Visit the peer advisor page for more information.


Department/Program Advising Information

Please continue to check back as additional events may be added.

New Courses for Spring 2020

CHM 111M — Molecules of Power

In this course, we examine how human experience has been influenced by bioactive chemical compounds (“molecules of power”) from natural sources, and how our relationship with these substances has evolved over time. At the same time, we will look at man-made potions that appear in myth, literature, and popular culture. How is the fiction impacted by fact and experience? Which molecules are medicines, which are poisons, and who decides? Examples will be drawn from 19th- 21st century novels, short stories, and film, and and from nonfiction sources such as personal accounts, essays and other perspectives on the history of our encounters with bioactive molecules.

Note: this course is intended for humanities and social science concentrators, and should not be used to satisfy any requirement (technical or otherwise) for chemistry majors/minors or for majors and/or minors in other natural sciences. Any exceptions must occur with the consultation and explicit approval of the departmental representative authorized to approve program of study exceptions for that major/minor. There are no prerequisites. Course size will be capped at 20 students. For further information, contact Professor Alison Frontier, alison.frontier@rochester.edu.

Humanities

Advising Session: Humanities

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in humanities and humanistic social sciences. There will be food, drink, "Humanities for Life" swag.

Participating departments and programs include:

  • Anthropology
  • Art History/studio art
  • Classics
  • Dance
  • English
  • Environmental humanities
  • History
  • Gender, sexuality and women's studies
  • Jewish studies
  • Modern languages and cultures
  • Religion
Dance and Movement

Highlighted Courses


DAN 202 — Dance and Peacebuilding

DAN 377 — Choreographic Voice: Dance and Physics Frontiers

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in humanities and humanistic social sciences. There will be food, drink, "Humanities for Life" swag.

Peer Advising Session with Lydia Currie

Friday, November 1, 1–2:30 p.m. — Spurrier Classroom, room 106

Refreshments will be offered.

Advisors


English

Highlighted Courses


ENG 236 — Internet Aesthetics: Viral Forms from the Global South

ENG 238 — Literature and the World: 21st Century African Fiction

ENG 262 — American Experiments: Film and Art of the 1930s

ENG 264 — Hitchcock's Signature/Signature Hitchcock

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in humanities and humanistic social sciences. There will be food, drink, "Humanities for Life" swag.

Advisors


  • Creative writing and literary translation
  • Joanna Scott
  • joanna.scott@rochester.edu
  • 404C Morey Hall
  • Friday, 3:30–5 p.m.
  • Advising also by appointment.
Film and Media Studies

Highlighted Courses


FMS 107 (P: GSW 100) — Intro to GSW: Televising Gender

FMS 205 (P: SA 151) — Arttech 1: Photoshop & Apocalypse

FMS 224 (P: ENG 262) — American Experiments: Film and Art of the 1930s

FMS 288 (ENG 264) — Hitchcock's Signature / Signature Hitchcock

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Undergraduate Film Council

Advisors


Modern Languages and Cultures

Highlighted Courses


FR 247 — Black Paris (taught in English)

GER 212 — Monsters, Ghosts and Aliens: From Schiller to Stephen King (taught in English)

IT 250 — Love and War in the Modern Italian Novel (taught in English)

JPN 259 — Japan after Japan: Japanese Culture and Society in Cultural Contexts (taught in English)

RUS 233 — Russian Women Writers (taught in English)

SP 280 — Trans-Hispanic Supernatural: Ghosts, Witches, and Vampires in Film and Literature from Spain & Spanish America (taught in Spanish)

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


MLC UG Council

View the department's advising hours.

Advising Events


Pre-Registration Pizza Party

Friday, October 25, Noon–1:30 p.m. — 401 Lattimore Hall

Meet faculty and discuss course offerings for the summer and fall. Learn more about study abroad and other language-learning opportunities.

Lunch (pizza, sandwiches, desserts, and more) will be provided. Vegetarian, dairy-free, and gluten-free options available.

Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in humanities and humanistic social sciences. There will be food, drink, "Humanities for Life" swag.

Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Hirst Lounge (Flag Lounge), Wilson Commons

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Music

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


Philosophy

Highlighted Courses


PHL 235 — Data, Algorithms, and Justice

PHL 246 — Social Character of Knowledge

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Undergraduate Philosophy Council

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Thursday, November 1, 3:30–5 p.m. — Humanities Center Lounge

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2019 as well as any other questions about majors and minors. Food will be provided.

Advisors


  • William FitzPatrick
  • william.fitzpatrick@rochester.edu
  • Lattimore 525
  • Tuesday, 1–3 p.m.
  • Please note: on Tuesday, October 22, advising office hours for Professor Fitzpatrick will be 2-4 p.m.
Writing, Speaking, and Argument

Questions concerning the primary writing requirement can be directed to the main office at any time Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. For questions regarding the minor or clusters, see Stefanie Sydelnik during advising hours.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Minor and Clusters
  • Stefanie Sydelnik
  • stefanie.sydelnik@rochester.edu
  • G-122 Rush Rhees Library
  • Tuesday, Noon–1 p.m.
    Wednesday, 2:30–3:30 p.m.
    Friday, 11 a.m.–Noon

Natural Sciences and Engineering

Biology

See the UPBM advising web page for track advisor information. This includes: biology, cell and developmental biology, biochemistry, computational biology, ecology and evolutionary biology, microbiology, molecular genetics, and neuroscience.

The UPBM peer advisors will have special office hours during the advising weeks. See the peer advising week (PDF) for times and locations.

Highlighted Courses


BIO 228A — IGEM I (International Genetically Engineered Machines Competition Course)

The objective of the International Genetically Engineered Machines competition is to design and build an engineered biological system using DNA technologies over the course of the summer. iGEM projects aim to solve local, real-world problems, for example by engineering bacteria that can break down plastic waste. You will design your own experiments, construct new genetic parts, and validate the constructs using new characterization assays. In addition to the wet-lab research, iGEM involves mathematical modeling to predict the behavior and guide the design of the new biological parts and characterization assays. Students also design, construct, characterize, and improve their own piece of hardware that will work together with the designed biological organism. The policy and practice component addresses the social, legal, and ethical issues of the project. iGEM is multi-disciplinary, highly collaborative, and student-managed. You will travel to Boston and interact with 300 universities from all over the world.

BIO 396W — Research Paper Writing in Biology

This 0.5-credit course is intended as a follow-up to BIO 395, and helps coach you through the process of writing up your research. You will investigate conventions for science writing in biology and apply what you have learned to writing your own report. A BIO faculty member will lead the course. It will consist of 4 one-hour writing workshops, a regularly meeting writing group (schedule tbd by students) and writing fellow support from the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program (as needed). Additionally, you are also expected to work closely with your research mentor to investigate nuances of communication in your particular area and to receive and respond to feedback on your report.

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Halloween Trick or Treat

Thursday, October 31, 1:30–3:30 p.m. — Green Carpet Lounge

The Society of Undergraduate Biology Students (SUBS) is hosting a Halloween Trick or Treat to the biology professor's offices. Come and meet your professors while getting some great treats and prizes (including a SUBS t-shirt)! A map and list of offices will be provided. Meet in the Green Carpet Lounge.

 

Advisors


  • BS Biochemistry
  • Dr. Elizabeth Grayhack, PhD
  • Medical Center 3-7415
  • Monday, 2–3 p.m.
  • Directions to Dr. Grayhack's office: https://www.sas.rochester.edu/bio/assets/pdf/undergraduate/upbmbsbch_GrayhackOfficeDirections.pdf.
  • BS Microbiology
  • Dr. Jacques Robert, PhD
  • MRBX 2-11124
  • Monday, 9–11:30 a.m.
    Tuesday, 9–11:30 a.m.
  • Directions to Dr. Robert's office: https://www.sas.rochester.edu/bio/assets/pdf/undergraduate/upbmbsmb_RobertOfficeDirections.pdf.
Biomedical Engineering

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


BME Pre-registration S20

Wednesday, October 23, Noon–4:30 p.m. — Munnerlyn Atrium

Open advising event

BME Pre-registration S20

Thursday, October 24, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.

Open advising event.

 

Chemical Engineering

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


T10/291–3 p.m.
W10/30Noon–2 p.m.

Open advising will be held in 4506 Wegmans Hall.

Chemistry

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Undergraduate Chemistry Council

View the department's advising hours.

Advising Events


Chemistry Pizza Social

Thursday, October 31, 8 p.m. — Douglass 401

The Undergraduate Chemistry Council (UCC) will be holding a Pizza Social event to bring attention to Advising Week in the Department of Chemistry. Please feel free to come and ask questions about majoring in chemistry, about how to meet with advisors, and as always, to meet your fellow chemistry majors! If you have questions, don't hesitate to email Kaelyn Mcfarlane-Connelly <kmcfarl5@u.rochester.edu (Secretary, UCC).

Data Science

 If a DSC course is full, submit your name to the data science course waitlist.

Highlighted Courses


DSC 267 — Database for Business and Data Science

Study of the design of databases and data structures for supporting business and data science. Topics include relational database structure and design, structured query language, database management systems, integration of backend database servers, data warehousing and mining, on-line analytical processing, and database application. Survey of new database technologies.  This course is not a substitution for the core database course, but can be used as an  elective to fulfill a course in the Economics and Business OR the Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics concentration areas.

Prerequisites: CSC161 or CSC171 (or equivalent intro programming).

DSC 201 — Tools for Data Science

Updated Prerequisites: CSC 161, CSC 171, or some equivalent programming experience strongly recommended

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Undergraduate Data Science Council

Advising Events


Careers in Data Science: Matt Egyhazy from M&T Bank

Friday, October 25, 1–2 p.m. — 1400 Wegmans Hall

Matt Egyhazy, Group Vice President of Technology: Head of Commercial, Credits, Treasury, Payments and Wilmington Trust Technology at M&T Bank, will discuss his career path and role as a chief data officer in financial services.

Data Science Course Overview (w/ lunch)

Friday, November 1, Noon–1 p.m. — 1400 Wegmans Hall

Instructors from courses within the data science major will give 5 minute overviews of their spring courses including DSC 201, DSC 265, DSC 267, DSC 383W, MTH 203, CSC 246, CSC 249, and WRT 273.  Meet with other data science students to talk about courses they have taken.

Advisors


  • Educational Program Coordinator
  • Lisa Altman
  • (585) 275-5288
  • lisa.altman@rochester.edu
  • 1209 Wegmans Hall
  • Friday, 3–5 p.m.
    Monday, 11 a.m.–2 p.m.
    Tuesday, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.
  • Other times may be available by appointment. Email lisa.altman@rochester.edu to schedule an appointment.
  • Peer Advisor
  • Qianyi Li
  • qli31@u.rochester.edu
  • 1211/1213 Wegmans Hall
  • Wednesday, 12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.
    Thursday, 1:20–2:20 p.m.
  • Email to schedule an appointment.
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Mudjat Cetin
  • mudjat.cetin@rochester.edu
  • 719 Computer Studies Building
  • Wednesday, 2–3 p.m.
    Thursday, 11 a.m.–Noon
    Wednesday, 2–3 p.m.
    Thursday, 11 a.m.–Noon
  • Wednesday open advising hours are held in CSB 719, Thursday hours are in Wegmans Hall 1211.
  • Tom Howard
  • 732 Computer Studies Building
  • Friday, 3:30–4:30 p.m.
  • Selcuk Kose
  • 621 Computer Studies Building
  • Tuesday, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
    Thursday, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Sarah Smith
  • 617 Computer Studies Building
  • Monday, 3–5 p.m.
    Wednesday, 2:30–5 p.m.
    Thursday, 9–11:30 a.m.
    Thursday, 3–5 p.m.
    Friday, 2–5 p.m.
    Monday, 3:30–5 p.m.
    Wednesday, 3:30–5 p.m.
    Thursday, 3–5 p.m.
Earth and Environmental Sciences

Highlighted Courses


EES 129/229 — Designing your Space Mission

EES 100 — Intro to Oceanography

EES 201 — Evolution of the Earth

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Environmental Sciences Open Advising

Tuesday, October 22, 10 a.m.–Noon — 227B Hutchison Hall

Geology Open Advising

Monday, October 28, Noon–5 p.m. — 224C Hutchison Hall

Environmental Sciences Open Advising

Friday, November 1, 1–3 p.m. — 227B Hutchison Hall

Advisors


Mechanical Engineering

Drop-in Advising

  • First-year: Monday, 10/28 from noon-2 p.m. in Hopeman 224
  • Sophomore: Monday, 10/28 from 10 a.m.-noon and Wednesday, 10/30 from 1-3 p.m. in Hopeman 224

All other upperclassmen are encouraged to schedule an appointment with their faculty adviser.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website
Mathematics

Advising Week Contact


Advisors


  • Mark Herman
  • 808 Hylan Hall
  • Wednesday, 10–11:30 a.m.
  • Kalyani Madhu
  • 815 Hylan Hall
  • Monday, 3:30–5 p.m.
  • Carl Mueller
  • 802 Hylan Hall
  • Tuesday, 10–11 a.m.
  • Amanda Tucker
  • 818 Hylan Hall
  • Monday, 2–3:30 p.m.
Physics and Astronomy

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Fall Advising Lunch

Friday, November 1, 12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m. — 208 Bausch & Lomb Hall

All majors and those interested in becoming majors are invited to join the physics and astronomy undergraduate office for information and pizza.

Advisors


Social Sciences

Anthropology

Highlighted Courses


ANT 104 — Contemporary Issues and Anthro

The scientist Albert Einstein, stateswoman Madeleine Albright, singer Gloria Estefan, and Google co-founder Sergey Brin have something in common: They all found refuge in the United States after leaving their countries of origin due to conflict, persecution, and other forms of violence. This course asks: Who are the refugees in the United States? Where do they come from? Who brought them here? How are they adapting to life in a land whose language, customs, rules, and expectations may be initially foreign to them? How are the long-term residents of that land responding to their presence and challenges? Pursuing these and related questions, this course offers an introduction to refugee experiences in the United States. Through engaging readings and audiovisual materials, the course will help students understand and think critically about refugees’ coping mechanisms, sociocultural integration processes, transnational identities, and their multifaceted efforts to make a living in different parts of the country.

ANT 247 — Anthropology of Muslim Societies

This course explores various aspects of Muslim life globally. Relying on primary anthropological scholarship, documentary films, reports, articles, and journalistic pieces, the course provides an ethnographic lens to discuss such issues as gender, religion, politics, culture and tradition as they are manifest in the everyday practices of Muslims in different places around the world, including the United States. Beginning with a brief introduction to the religion of Islam, the course continues by considering the variety of cultural patterns, social institutions, ideological positions, and behavioral adaptations among the world’s Muslims. Students should leave the course with an informed understanding of the sociocultural diversity among the adherents of this second largest faith group in the world. There are no traditional midterms or exams in the course, and students should expect to enhance their critical thinking, analysis, writing, and presentation skills as they fulfill course requirements.

ANT 303 — Advanced Topic Seminar: Migration

Migration is a universal part of human life, but it takes on special meanings in a contemporary world divided by the borders of nation-states. This course will investigate migration in a broad anthropological context, with a special focus on recent studies of migration in the Americas (North, South, and Central). Readings will include contemporary studies from the anthropology and sociology of migration, as well as classic texts on topics like: boundaries and the social order, language and nationalism, structure and agency, shifting gender roles, and the politics of cultural identity. Students will also be expected to conduct some original research on a topic related to migration.

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Undergraduate Anthropology Council

Walk-In Hours


W10/3010:30 a.m.–3 p.m.

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in humanities and humanistic social sciences. There will be food, drink, "Humanities for Life" swag.

Business

Highlighted Courses


BUS 201 — Impactful Presentations

BUS 210 — Art of Pitching (2 credits)

BUS 241 — Boom and Bust: Famous Market Failure

FIN 224 — Options, Futures, and Derivatives

LAW 250 — Business Law: Transactions and Other Topics

STR 221 — Business Strategy

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Walk-In Hours


M10/2110–11:30 a.m.
T10/221–3:30 p.m.
W10/231–3:30 p.m.
Th10/2410–11:30 a.m.

Advising Events


Undergraduate Business Alumni Panel

Friday, November 22, Noon–2 p.m. — Schlegel Rotunda

Join the Barry Florescue Undergraduate Business Program for an exciting panel discussion featuring four undergraduate business program alumni. Panelists will share their experience and the role that the University played in their professional success. There will be a question and answer session from noon-1 p.m. with a networking reception to follow from 1-2 p.m. Refreshments will be served!

Learn More and Register

Economics

Faculty advisors are available for consultation during weekday office hours and by appointment. See the advising page of the economics website for more information.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Undergraduate Economics and Finance

History

Students choose an advisor based on their interests. Our faculty office/walk-in hours and specialty area are listed in the advisors section below.

Highlighted Courses


HIS 101 — Sixteenth-Century Reformations (Greenwood)

HIS 144 — Bruce Lee and Me: A History of Chinese Americans (Ho)

HIS 159 — Trump and the Making of the Border (Flores)

HIS 240 — Public History: Theory and Practice (Ball and Jarvis)

HIS 200 — Gateway to History: The Eastern Front (Lenoe)

HIS 200 — Gateway to History: The World of Thomas Jefferson (Slaughter)

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


History Advising Open House

Wednesday, October 23, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. — 456 Rush Rhees Library

Stop by during this session to discuss your course plans for next semester with history students, faculty, and staff. Refreshments will be provided.

Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in humanities and humanistic social sciences. There will be food, drink, "Humanities for Life" swag.

HIS 280/280W The Archeology of Early America Information Meeting

Thursday, October 24, 6–6:45 p.m. — 2-162 Dewey Hall

This course will introduce you to historical archeology research and field methods through lectures, discussions and a spring break practicum on Trunk Island, Bermuda. Come to this meeting to find out more, or contact Professor Michael Jarvis before registration.

Advisors


  • Medieval and Renaissance Europe
  • Laura Smoller
  • laura.smoller@rochester.edu
  • 369A Rush Rhees Library
  • Wednesday, 11 a.m.–Noon
    Thursday, 2:30–3:30 p.m.
Linguistics

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Linguistics Undergraduate Council

Advisors


  • Undergraduate Advisor for Linguistics
  • Maya Abtahian
  • maya.r.abtahian@rochester.edu
  • 514 Lattimore Hall
  • Thursday, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
    Thursday, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
  • Peer Advisor for Linguistics
  • Manasvi Chaturvedi
  • mchaturv@u.rochester.edu
  • 502 Lattimore Hall
  • Tuesday, 2–3:30 p.m.
    Tuesday, 2–3:30 p.m.
Political Science/International Relations

Highlighted Courses


PSC/IR 102 — Introduction to International Political Economy

PSC 227 — Designing American Democracy

PSC 228 — Race, Ethnicity and American Politics

PSC 232 — Disagreement in a Democratic Society

PSC 235 — The Political Economy of US Food Policy

PSC/IR 260 — Democratic Erosion

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Academic Council


Undergraduate Political Science and International Relations Council

View the department's advising hours.

Advising Events


Political Science and International Relations Advising Event

Monday, October 21, 5–6:30 p.m. — Havens Lounge

Faculty members and peer advisors will be available to discuss the political science and international relations majors, to describe the new courses, and to advise on spring course selection. This event is sponsored by the Undergraduate Political Science and International Relations Council. Pizza will be provided.

Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology

Highlighted Courses


PSY 230 — Psychology of Well-Being

What contributes to a happy and satisfying life? In this course, students will learn about how science has come to conceptualize well-being and the many factors that may promote or undermine it. Topics will include exploring the role of personal, social, and cultural influences on well-being. (Prerequisite: PSY 101)

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advisors


  • Peer Advising
  • Thao Hoang
  • 450 Meliora Hall
  • Monday, 3:30–4:30 p.m.
  • Peer Advising
  • Brandon Reinkensmayer
  • 450 Meliora Hall
  • Tuesday, 11 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Peer Advising
  • Megan Scroger
  • 450 Meliora Hall
  • Monday, 1:30–2 p.m.
    Wednesday, 1:30–2 p.m.

Interdisciplinary Studies

Archaeology, Technology, and Historical Structures

Highlighted Courses


ATH 112 — Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology

This course will review the prehistory of ancient societies in the Andes, which will begin from the peopling of the continent to the conquest of the Inca Empire by the Spanish. Students will become familiar with Andean chronologies as well as the prehispanic cultures of Chinchorro, Caral, Chavin, Pukara, Paracas, Moche, Nasca, Wari, Tiwanaku, Chimú, and the Inca, among others. Special attention will be paid to how these societies adapted to the diverse ecology of the Andes. Topics include the history of Peruvian archaeology; plant and animal domestication; the development of social complexity, the emergence of religion; prehispanic art and symbolism; ancient technology, economies and trade; and urbanism. The course includes material from archaeological investigations and interpretations as well as ethnohistoric and ethnographic sources.

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


ATHS Mandatory Advising Session

Friday, November 1, 1–4 p.m. — 236 Hopeman Hall

In preparation for registering for the spring 2020 semester, all ATHS students (majors and minors) must meet with Professor Perucchio, ATHS director, to review their program on Friday, November 1st from 1-4 p.m. in Hopeman 236 (Professor Perucchio's office). This is a walk-in session, you don't need to reserve a time.

Please contact Professor Perucchio in advance at rlp@me.rochester.edu to confirm that you will make this meeting.

ATHS Open House

Monday, October 28, 6–7:30 p.m. — Art & Music Library (first floor Rush Rhees Library)

Learn about the Archaeology, Technology, and Historical Structures program, including courses, research, visiting archaeology faculty from Africa, and archaeology field school opportunities in Ghana, Italy, and Peru. Pizza and cookies will be offered!

Advisors


  • ATH Program Director
  • Professor Renato Perucchio
  • rlp@me.rochester.edu
  • 236 Hopeman Hall
  • Advising available by appointment.

Other Advising Week Opportunities

Advising Session: Humanities

Advising Events


Humanities Joint Pre-registration Information and Advising Session

Tuesday, October 29, 3:30–5 p.m. — Welles-Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library

Advisors and faculty from many humanities departments and programs will be available to share information about classes for spring 2020 as well as any other questions about majors and minors.

Learn about classes in humanities and humanistic social sciences. There will be food, drink, "Humanities for Life" swag.

Participating departments and programs include:

  • Anthropology
  • Art History/studio art
  • Classics
  • Dance
  • English
  • Environmental humanities
  • History
  • Gender, sexuality and women's studies
  • Jewish studies
  • Modern languages and cultures
  • Religion
Certificate in Community-Engaged Learning

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Certificate in Community-Engaged Learning

Wednesday, October 23, 4:30–5:30 p.m. — 401 Douglass

The Certificate in Community-Engaged Learning is a program offered by the Rochester Center for Community Leadership. Through pursuing an academic certificate in community-engaged learning, students passionate about integrated learning and responding to community-identified needs are able to design a course of study and practice that complements the Rochester Curriculum and their chosen areas of study. The certificate is designed to contextualize abstract theories, develop critical skills, and challenge assumptions that will prepare them for their future at UR and beyond.

Center for Education Abroad

Peer advisors are available during walk-in hours to answer quick questions and to begin the process of going abroad. These meetings are limited to a maximum of 10 minutes. If you have a more in-depth question, please schedule a 30-minute appointment with an education abroad advisor. Call (585) 275-7532 or stop by our office to make an appointment.

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


HIS 280/280W The Archeology of Early America Information Meeting

Thursday, October 24, 6–6:45 p.m. — 2-162 Dewey Hall

This course will introduce you to historical archeology research and field methods through lectures, discussions and a spring break practicum on Trunk Island, Bermuda. Come to this meeting to find out more, or contact Professor Michael Jarvis before registration.  

Gwen M. Greene Center for Career Education and Connections

The Greene Center offers drop-in collaboration hours for all students Monday-Friday 1-4 p.m. in the Greene Center studio on the 4th floor of Dewey Hall. You never need an appointment! Both our professional advisors and Peer Career Advisors (PCAs) will be available to help you explore academic and career possibilities, and answer quick career education questions and document reviews.

Highlighted Courses


CAS 104 — Design Your Life (+Career!)

Design Your Life (+Career!) is a seven-week dynamic course that applies a design-thinking framework and mindset to career exploration and development. Students will engage in experiential activities in and out of the classroom, along with self-reflection, readings and discussion. Through successful completion of this course, students will be able to architect their experiences at Rochester and beyond, and be better equipped to navigate academic, career and life decisions.

View a Video

For more information see course schedules and descriptions.

Advising Week Contact


Advising Events


Advising Weeks Healthcare Community Advising Hours

Monday October 21/28: 1-2:30 p.m.
Tuesday, October 22/29: 2:30-4 p.m.
Wednesday, October 23/30: 1-2 p.m.

Are you curious about health professions and have questions about what classes you are thinking about taking next semester? Visit with an advisor from the Healthcare Career Community during advising weeks to discuss course selection as well as how to explore your interests outside of the classroom. Advisors will be hosting collaboration hours in the Greene Center studio, 4th floor Dewey Hall, during advising weeks October 21st - November 1st on Mondays 1-2:30pm, Tuesdays 2:30-4pm and Wednesdays 1-2pm. You can also schedule an advising appointment through Handshake.

Design Over Lunch

Tuesday, October 29, Noon–1 p.m.

Feeling unsure about your course selection? Curious about a lot of different things and not sure how to get started? Stop by the Greene Center table in Hirst Lounge, Wilson Commons on Tuesday 10/29 between noon-1 p.m. for a free snack and to start exploring possibilities around what next semester could bring!

Office of Undergraduate Research

Advising Week Contact


Department Website

Advising Events


Undergraduate Research Fair

Friday, October 18, 1–3 p.m. — Feldman Ballroom, Douglass Commons

Patterned after the Study Abroad Fair and the Academic Open Houses, there will be tables populated by knowledgeable experts from various departments/programs on the River Campus and Med Campus who can answer questions concerning undergraduate research in that discipline.