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Summer Courses

Summer 2019 Online Courses

onlinelearning

Note: Courses and schedules are subject to change.

Registration

StudentRegistration Opens
University of Rochester StudentsMonday, February 19, 2019
Visiting StudentsMonday, April 8, 2019

While no formal application is required, some courses have pre-requisites. See the registration requirements page for more information.

Books

Books can be purchased at the University of Rochester Bookstore

Contact Us

Need help determining which courses are right for you? Contact the Office of Summer Programs and Part-Time Studies at osp@rochester.edu or call (585) 275-2345. To set up an appointment to speak with an advisor, please contact the Center for Advising Services at (585) 275-2354.


Full Course Listings

ASL 101 Beginning American Sign Language I
(CRN: 10209)  

Credits: 4.0
Dates: May 20 - June 28, 2019
Instructor: Tourangeau
Prerequisites: None 

An introductory online course in American Sign Language as developed and used by the Deaf community in most areas of North America. Everyday communication is the centerpiece of every lesson. Topics revolve around sharing information about our environment and us. Grammar is introduced in context, with an emphasis on developing question and answer skills. You learn conversational strategies to help you maintain a conversation. Students will also be exposed to native signers modeling appropriate language and cultural behaviors in various situations. Interaction activities allow you to rehearse what you’ve learned.

ASL 101 Beginning American Sign Language I
(CRN: 10194)  

Credits: 4.0
Dates: July 1 - August 9, 2019
Instructor: Nickels
Prerequisites: None 

An introductory online course in American Sign Language as developed and used by the Deaf community in most areas of North America. Everyday communication is the centerpiece of every lesson. Topics revolve around sharing information about our environment and us. Grammar is introduced in context, with an emphasis on developing question and answer skills. You learn conversational strategies to help you maintain a conversation. Students will also be exposed to native signers modeling appropriate language and cultural behaviors in various situations. Interaction activities allow you to rehearse what you’ve learned.

BIO 218P: Data Analysis in R
(CRN: 14475)  

Credits: 1.0
Dates: May 20 - June 28, 2019
Instructor: Presgraves
Prerequisites: Completion of any university-level applied statistics course (ex. STT 212, ECO 230 or departmental equivalent) is required. 

This course will be taught ONLINE with 11 modules that are approximately 75 minutes each. There will be a problem set that students will need to complete for each module. The content of this course will focus on graphing, basic statistical analysis (goodness of fit tests, student's t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, regression, and general linear models) and an introduction to programming in R (built-in functions, libraries and general strategies in problem-solving). This course will appeal to students who have previously completed an applied statistics course and who want to gain more experience with R. In particular, students who are interested in pursuing a Computational Biology major or whose future plans include graduate school are encouraged to take this course.

CSC 171: Introduction to Computer Science
(CRN: 22514)  

Credits: 4.0
Dates: May 20 - June 28, 2019
Instructor: Pawlicki
Prerequisites: None

Hands-on introduction to programming using the Java programming language. Teaches fundamentals of programming and more advanced topics. Emphasizes algorithmic thinking and computational problem solving and provides an introduction to the concepts and methods used in Computer Science. Required for all CSC majors.

CSC 172: Data Structures and Algorithms
(CRN: 22509)  

Credits: 4.0
Dates: July 1 - August 9, 2019
Instructor: Pawlicki
Prerequisites: CSC 171 (Introduction to Computer Science) or equivalent; MTH 150 (Discrete Mathematics) is required

Abstract data types (e.g., sets, mappings, and graphs) and their implementation as concrete data structures in Java. Analysis of the running times of programs operating on such data structures, and basic techniques for program design, analysis, and proof of correctness (e.g., induction and recursion). Lab and workshop required. If the course is closed, DO NOT email the professor. Fill out this form to be added to the waitlist: https://goo.gl/forms/IyFoIfjrtISvJls62. Additional places, if any, will become available automatically for online registration.

EAS 150: Interfacing with Microcontrollers
(CRN: 22459)  

Credits: 2.0
Dates: July 1 - August 9, 2019
Instructor: Seidman
Prerequisites: None

This course will instruct on how to interface sensors and actuators with micro controllers to make measurements and control objects in the real world. No knowledge of programming or micro controllers is required. Course will be online, generally asynchronous with one synchronous organizational meeting (available as a live video conference) and will contain many laboratory exercises. Access to a PC or Mac computer, a reliable internet connection, the means to record a video (cell phone is fine) Are necessary. The purchase of a microcontroller kit and some electronic tools and parts (approx $55 total), in lieu of a textbook, are required.

POR 111: Intensive Elementary Portuguese
(CRN: 222142)  

Credits: 6.0
Dates: May 20 - June 28, 2019
Instructor: Valdez
Prerequisites: None 

This online course is designed for beginners who wish to master the basic structures and vocabulary of the language and develop basic language skills. In the first half of the class, students learn the language and culture by practicing four main language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. During this second half of the course, students will: Continue to build a vocabulary base in order to increase language skills; Continue to use acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures; Develop knowledge of the grammar structures associated with, but not limited to: talking about events in the present; talking about completed past events; expressing continuing events; describing daily routines and habits; Listen to passages or conversations and discuss their content; Read authentic texts and discuss their content; Write paragraphs and short compositions using acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures; Engage in and sustain face-to-face conversation with others about topics studied.

STT 212: Applied Statistics I
(CRN: 21543)  

Credits: 4.0
Dates: July 1 - August 9, 2019
Instructor: McDermott
Prerequisites: None 

This online course is a non-calculus based introduction to statistical methodology and analyses that focuses on providing students with the tools and computational experience needed to analyze data in the applied setting. Topics to be covered include data collection through experiments and observational studies, numerical and graphical data summarization, basic probability rules, statistical distributions, parameter estimation, and methods of statistical inference, regression analysis, ANOVA, and contingency tables. Applications are taken from the social and natural sciences. Calculations are performed with statistical software such as R/RStudio. Students may earn degree credit for only one of these courses: STT211, STT212, STT213, and BIO/STT214. This course is recommended for students majoring/minoring in statistics and students in the social and natural sciences looking for an applied statistics course that can be used as a foundation for upper-level methodology courses.

WRT 273: Engineering - Communicating Your Professional Identity
(CRN: 22036)  

Credits: 2.0
Dates: May 21 - July 16, 2019
Instructor: Jones
Prerequisites: Completion of the Primary Writing Requirement 

This online interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester’s end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today’s competitive environment. This course is suitable for second-semester sophomores and juniors in the Hajim School; all others require permission of the instructor.