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Courses

Winter Session 2021 Course Offerings

Winter Session 2021 will be taught fully online, so you can participate from wherever you are spending your Winter Break. View details on each course offering by expanding the list items below. For information on course tuition and fees, visit the costs page.

AHST 126-1J Art & Identity: 1970 to Today

Meeting Times: Mondays through Thursdays; 10 a.m.-12:05 p.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Art and Art History
Instructor: Peter Murphy
Prerequisites: None
Format: Online
Description: This course will introduce students to artists working in the United States whose work engages with questions of identity. Although the subject of identity has been taken up by artists throughout history, it took on a new role for artists working in the wake of social and cultural revolutions during the latter half of twentieth century. Following landmark historical moments in the US such as the civil rights movement, Roe vs. Wade, and the Stonewall riots, the topics of race, gender, and sexuality were addressed with a newfound intensity by artists such as David Hammons, Barbara Kruger, and Félix González-Torres. These artists not only meditated upon these transformational events, but also challenged the status quo through their innovative practices. In this course, we will trace a loose timeline of these ongoing histories by focusing on work made by women artists, queer/LGBTQ artists, and artists of color. Questions this course will address include: How does identity manifest in a work of art? Does an artist’s identity determine an artwork’s meaning? How is artmaking a form of activism? Students will be graded upon their attendance and participation in the course, as well as short writing assignments due each week.

BIOL 155-1J Introduction to Microscopy and Image Analysis

Meeting Times: Wednesdays and Fridays, 12-2:05 p.m.
Credits: 1.0
Department: Biology
Instructor: Christian Cammarota
Prerequisites: None. Any prior programming knowledge is useful, but everything needed to work on image analysis will be presented in this course.
Format: Online
Description: This one-credit hour course is to serve as an introduction to both microscopy and image analysis in a research setting. Without the ability to use any microscopes in person, the concepts and uses of certain microscopy techniques will be detailed in lecture. In addition to microscopy, quantitative analysis of image data will be taught through both lecture and project-based learning. The image analysis program FIJI, as well as the programming language Python, will be used for class projects.

BIOL 156-1J Structural Bioinformatics

Meeting Times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 3:30-5 p.m.
Credits: 1.0
Department: Biology
Instructor: Hongying Sun
Prerequisites: None
Format: Online
Description: This course will provide an introduction to RNA Structural Bioinformatics from RNA sequencing, to RNA secondary, and 3D structure determination. Topics will include RNA thermodynamics, RNA secondary structure determination, Dynamic Programming Algorithm, RNA secondary structure prediction, and RNA 3D structure.

CLST 143-1J Stoics and Epicureans

Meeting Times: Monday through Fridays; 10-10:50 a.m.
Credits: 1.0
Department: Religion and Classics
Instructor: Nicholas Gresens
Prerequisites: None
Format: Online
Description: Happiness, contentment, blessedness, eudaimonia—whatever it’s called, philosophers have been seeking it for millennia. This class will examine two ancient Greek philosophical systems that sought to achieve eudaimonia for their adherents: Stoicism and the Epicureanism. Through daily close readings of ancient sources like Lucretius, Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius (in translation), lectures, discussions, and regular short writing assignments, we will examine the physics, logic, and ethics of these schools which approached life from very different perspectives. Each offered a different path to happiness, and each can perhaps offer something to help us deal with our own day to day existence.

DANC 114-1J Introduction to Yoga

Meeting Times: Mondays through Thursdays; 9-11:05 a.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Dance
Instructor: Rose Beauchamp
Prerequisites: None
Format: Online
Description: Yoga is defined as union, the uniting together of ourselves in all aspects—body, mind, heart, spirit. This class introduces the student to a hatha yoga method, which integrates a dynamic and engaging approach to living through practicing on and off the mat. The goal of this class is to learn how to create a deeper, more enlivened relationship to one’s self through honoring one’s abilities and limitations, while growing one’s skills and sensitivity in the supportive environment of the class community. Students will engage with principles of attitude, alignment and action in a full range of hatha yoga poses, breathing techniques, readings on yoga philosophy, reflection, journaling, and discussion. Through this ongoing process, students of yoga are encouraged to cultivate a more expansive and clear perception of self and others. Attendance in selected workshops and performances are required.

MATH 212-1J Mathematical Finance: Stock Options and the Black-Scholes Equation

Meeting Times: Mondays through Thursdays; 2-4:05 p.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Mathematics
Instructor: Ian Alevy
Prerequisites: MTH 162 or equivalent
Format: Online
Description: This course will explore the mathematics of stock options. We will discuss the Binomial Option Pricing Model and the Black-Scholes Equation. If time permits, we will discuss Modern Portfolio Theory.

PHIL 233-1J Philosophy of Markets

Meeting Times: Mondays through Thursdays; 1-3:05 p.m.
Credits: 2.0
Instructor: Jacob Morris
Prerequisites: None
Department: Philosophy
Format: Online
Description: This course discusses central issues in the philosophy of economics. In particular, it covers moral and practical arguments for various market policies. Beginning with classical economics, we look at the underlying philosophies that have been used to argue for various levels of market control. These arguments are often essentially ethical, with a special focus on rights. This course will introduce relevant ethical literature with the end goal of analyzing these diverse market policies. Finally, we’ll look at different ways in which philosophers and economists have tried to remedy the moral concerns arising from views about markets ranging from radical free-market economics to Marxism.

PHLT 217-1J Population Health and Community

Meeting Times: Mondays through Fridays; 1-2:40 p.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Public Health Sciences (School of Medicine and Dentistry)
Instructor: Theresa Green
Prerequisites: None
Format: Online
Description: The healthcare system in the United States is not sustainable, with escalating costs, mediocre health outcomes, and unacceptable disparities. This course will first discuss the current system, including how the U.S. compares to other countries on the triple aim—lower cost, better care, and a healthier population. There will be a strong focus on current events, media, and policy discussions that drive the current system. We will then explore underlying root causes like poverty and racism by examining population health data, with particular focus on Rochester. Students will then learn about community agencies working to improve health and the social determinants of health including housing, food systems, and education and we will study effective and respectful ways of engaging the community in community-based participatory interventions. Students will practice community observation, needs assessment, community-engaged learning, and advocacy through many interactive exercises.

PYSC 101A-1J Introduction to Psychology

Meeting Times: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 9-11:50 a.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Psychology
Instructor: Christopher Niemiec
Prerequisites: None
Format: Online
Description: This course is a balanced and integrated survey of psychology with coverage of both natural and social science domains. This course is intended for students with some prior exposure to psychology (in high school) who did not receive credit for PSYC 101. Earning a score of B- or higher in this course will satisfy the PSYC 101 requirement at the University of Rochester.

SART 123-1J Autobiographical Painting: Transforming the Stories of Our Ancestors into Art

Meeting Times: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12-4:10 p.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Art and Art History
Instructor: Heather Layton
Prerequisites: None. While students may have previous painting experience, no art experience is required.
Format: Online, synchronous and asynchronous
Technological Requirements: Students will need Internet access to participate in Zoom sessions and a camera to document the art (cell phone cameras will work).
Supplies: Students may use watercolor, gouache, acrylic and/or oil paint. Registered students will receive further information about supplies before the start of class.
Description: This studio art course weaves technical painting instruction with personal storytelling. We will start by exploring autobiographical prompts such as, "What is the oldest story you know about your oldest ancestor?" followed by questions about childhood memories, family, extracurricular interests, relationships, the experience of living within your body, instances when race/religion/gender has played a role in your life and what you envision for the future. We will create incubation boards that will help us to transform our written/spoken stories into at least one finished painting. Classes will be comprised of presentations of contemporary artists, technique demonstrations, group discussions, critiques, and guided studio time. Each student will complete this course with at least one finished painting and plans for 10 more.

WRTG 273-1J Communicating Your Professional Identity—Engineering

Meeting Times: Mondays through Fridays; 10-11:40 a.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program
Instructor: Kellie Hernandez
Prerequisites: Hajim students: completion of the primary writing requirement and a minimum of two engineering or CS courses in their major required. Non-Hajim students: instructor permission required.
Format: Online
Description: This interactive course teaches real-life communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career, and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester, based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester's end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today's competitive environment. This course is suitable for sophomores and juniors in the Hajim School.

WRTG 273-2J Communicating Your Professional Identity—Engineering

Meeting Times: Mondays through Fridays; 9-10:40 a.m.
Credits: 2.0
Department: Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program
Instructor: Liz Tinelli
Prerequisites: Hajim students: completion of the primary writing requirement and a minimum of two engineering or CS courses in their major required. Non-Hajim students: instructor permission required.
Format: Online
Description: This interactive course teaches real-life communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career, and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester, based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester's end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today's competitive environment. This course is suitable for sophomores and juniors in the Hajim School.