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November 15, 2010

Notables

Ford/
Ford
Jarvis
Jarvis
Calnon
Calnon
Phelps
Phelps
Bernstein
Bernstein
Hazen
Hazen

Loretta Ford, a professor and dean emeritus at the School of Nursing, received the Princess Srinagarindra Award Oct. 21 in Bangkok, Thailand. The honor is conferred annually upon a registered nurse or midwife or group of registered nurses or midwives who have made significant contributions through direct care, research, education or management within the profession. Established in honor of the late Princess Srinagarindra Mahidol, mother of King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand, the award is recognized as one of the most prestigious given by the country.

Michael Jarvis, an associate professor of history, won the 2010 James A. Rawley Prize in Atlantic History for his book, In the Eye of All Trade: Bermuda, Bermudians, and the Maritime Atlantic World, 1680-1783. The honor is given each year by the American Historical Association. The award recognizes a work of outstanding scholarship and literary merit that explores aspects of the Atlantic world before the 20th century. It will be presented to Jarvis in January during the association’s annual meeting in Boston.

William Calnon, Eastman Dental Center Foundation Board chairman and local dentist, has been named president-elect of the American Dental Association. He will assume the office of ADA president in October 2011.

Dale Phelps, a professor of pediatrics at Golisano Children’s Hospital, received the Landmark Award at the annual American Academy of Pediatrics meeting in San Francisco. She was honored for her pioneering work collaborating with the ophthalmology investigators in treating retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a common eyesight problem in babies born early.

Phelps is a leader in the research of how to identify and treat the sight-robbing disease among premature babies, having helped design the first clinical trial of cryotherapy for ROP. The trial was stopped early because it was so effective that researchers wanted to speed its implementation as a treatment. Based on the trial, ablation therapy became standard of care for ROP in 1988, and cryotherapy or later laser therapy has since preserved vision for thousands of preterm infants.

Steven Bernstein, professor of medicine and co-director of the Lymphoma Biology Program at the Wilmot Cancer Center  and a leader in lymphoma research, was named to the National Medical and Scientific Advisory Board for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the world’s largest voluntary health organization dedicated to funding blood cancer research, education and patient services.

His laboratory and clinical research interest centers on immunological approaches to the treatment of lymphoma as well as in the development of novel redox active anti-lymphoma therapeutics. Bernstein is funded by the National Cancer Institute, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, and the Lymphoma Research Foundation.

Logan Hazen, as assistant professor at the Warner School, was awarded the 2010 LGBTQ Ally of the Year Award, presented by the Warner School LGBTQ & Allies SIG, for his contributions to the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning) community at Warner. Hazen was recognized for his efforts in helping to create a safe and supportive atmosphere for LGBTQ & Ally students and for assisting the Warner LGBTQ & Allies SIG in conducting a survey that assessed LGBTQ knowledge and awareness, as well as curriculum and training needs.

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