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May 17, 2011

Notables

Davies
Davies
Campbell
Campbell
Moss
Moss
Thurman
Thurman
Crimp
Crimp

Kiyama
Kiyama

Patrick Davies, a professor of psychology, has been awarded a James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowship for 2011–12. Given each year to a handful of psychology researchers, the national award will provide Davies with extended sabbatical leave for research on how children respond to conflict in families from early childhood through adolescence. The fellowship will be announced at the Association for Psychological Science annual conference May 26 to 29, in Washington, D.C.

Thomas Campbell, the William Rocktaschel Professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical Center, was recently named president-elect of the Association of Departments of Family Medicine. Association members elected Campbell to the position at the organization’s 2011 Winter Meeting in Charleston, S.C. His term extends through 2014. Campbell has previously held the positions of program chair and member-at-large on its board of directors. Campbell is nationally recognized for his work on the role of the family in medical practice and the influence of the family on health.

Arthur Moss, a professor of cardiology at the Medical Center and world-renowned expert on electrical disturbances of the heart, received the Heart Rhythm Society’s Distinguished Scientist Award May 6, at the society’s 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions in San Francisco. The award is given annually to an individual who has made major contributions to the understanding and treatment of heart rhythm disorders.

History doctoral student Kira Thurman has been awarded the University of Notre Dame’s Erskine A. Peters Fellowship, one of the more competitive graduate scholarships in the country. The 10-month residential fellowship will provide Thurman with mentorship, visiting faculty status, access to the extensive resources of Notre Dame, and uninterrupted time to complete her dissertation, “A History of Black Musicians in Germany, 1870 to 1961: Race, Performance, and Reception.”

Douglas Crimp, the Fanny Knapp Allen Professor of Art History and Professor of Visual and Cultural Studies, spoke at an event held in his honor at the Centre Pompidou, a national museum and cultural event space in Paris. As part of a larger lecture cycle named for its host, French art historian and critic Patricia Falguiéres, Crimp was asked to discuss the history of art criticism, queer theory, and AIDS activism in the 1970s, interrelated movements in which he is a major figure.

Judy Marquez Kiyama, an assistant professor in educational leadership, has been selected as a 2011 Emerging Scholar by the American College Personnel Association. She is one of five scholars who are being recognized as emerging contributing scholars in student affairs and higher education.

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