The University of Rochester Libraries are acquiring new, state-of-the-art technology that will place a vast world of information right on the scholaržs desk. When the system is fully implemented by the end of next year, faculty, students, and other researchers will be able to connect from their desks directly to data, reference manuals, journals, and recent reports. Such a scholaržs workstation marks the achievement of a long term goal of information specialists and is an exciting enhancement to the Campus Wide Information System.

The University has signed a contract with Endeavor Information Systems of Rosemont, IL to install the Voyager system, a major initiative that brings 21st century technology to the River Campus Libraries, Sibley Music Library of the Eastman School, and the Edward G. Miner Library at the Medical Center. University librarians were part of a team of co-developers who worked with Endeavor staff in building the search interface for the Voyager system.

With the new system, users can

* View the catalog of the Universityžs libraries, as well as computerized information, using the World Wide Web.

* Store the results of search of the catalog in their own computers, for future reference.

* Link to databases which offer the full text of newspapers, magazines, and journals.

* Connect to journals that are available in electronic format. Retrieve data and other information from Internet sites.

* Electronically request an interlibrary loan or photocopy.

The library system is another link in the campus plan to connect all campus residence halls to the full range of electronic information. Earlier this year the University announced its planned Residential Computing Network (ResNet) which will provide an Internet connection from every room in campus residence halls by the end of 1997. Phase I of ResNet is to be completed this fall and includes six major River Campus dormitories.

"The Voyager System helps the Libraries to support student and faculty scholarship with the newest generation of information science and Internet tools," said Ronald Dow, dean of River Campus Libraries. "The system gives us better access to traditional library collections as well as to information and research sources maintained by libraries and others in electronic format around the world."