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Tag: Arts and Sciences

Community-engaged learning moves the classroom beyond the classroom

Community-engaged learning moves the classroom beyond the classroom

August 1, 2015

There are nearly 40 courses offered at the College that involve working within the greater Rochester community at some level.

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Researchers find that Earth’s magnetic shield is 500 million years older than previously thought

Researchers find that Earth’s magnetic shield is 500 million years older than previously thought

July 30, 2015

Since 2010, the best estimate of the age of Earth’s magnetic field has been 3.45 billion years. But now the Rochester researcher responsible for that finding has new data showing the magnetic field is far older.

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Ancient huts may reveal clues to earth’s magnetic pole reversals

Ancient huts may reveal clues to earth’s magnetic pole reversals

July 28, 2015

Patches of ground where huts were burned down in southern Africa contain a key mineral that recorded the magnetic field at the time of each ritual burning.

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A healthy social life in your 20s may be a key to longevity

A healthy social life in your 20s may be a key to longevity

July 24, 2015

How busy your social life is at age 20 — and how solid the relationships are that you make when you’re 30 — are factors in your well-being later in life, according to research from the University of Rochester.

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College social life can predict well-being at midlife

College social life can predict well-being at midlife

July 23, 2015

A new 30-year longitudinal study shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has in their 20s—and the quality of the social relationships they have in their 30s—can benefit his or her well-being later in life. The study participants, now in their 50s, took part in the Rochester-Interaction Record (RIR) study as college students in the 1970s and again as 30-year-olds in the 1980s.

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Drawing a line between quantum and classical: Bell’s Inequality fails test as boundary

Drawing a line between quantum and classical: Bell’s Inequality fails test as boundary

July 21, 2015

The best guide to the boundary between our everyday world and the “spooky” features of the quantum world has been a theorem called Bell’s Inequality, but now a new paper shows that we understand the frontiers of that quantum world less well than scientists have thought.

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Babies’ expectations may help brain development

Babies’ expectations may help brain development

July 20, 2015

A series of studies with infants 5 to 7 months old has shown that the portion of babies’ brains responsible for visual processing responds not just to the presence of visual stimuli, but also to the mere expectation of visual stimuli.

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WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

WATCH: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

June 24, 2015

This video, which was put together by a group of University of Rochester researchers, demonstrates a phenomenon known as the “curveball illusion,” which basically tricks hitters into thinking a curveball is dropping quicker than it is.

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Watch: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

Watch: The optical illusion that makes it so hard to hit a curveball

June 23, 2015

In baseball, the curveball is a monumentally difficult pitch to hit. It turns out there’s a very good scientific reason why. In a recent paper, a group of University of Rochester cognitive scientists conducted some tests to propose a new model of how the human brain uses motion to estimate the location of an object — and explain why it can sometimes be tricked.

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How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

June 22, 2015

Our brains track moving objects by applying one of the algorithms your phone’s GPS uses, according to researchers at the University of Rochester. This same algorithm also explains why we are fooled by several motion-related optical illusions, including the sudden “break” of baseball’s well known “curveball illusion.”

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