Please consider downloading the latest version of Internet Explorer
to experience this site as intended.
Tools Search Main Menu

Tag: Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences

Your ear is a tape measure

Your ear is a tape measure

January 21, 2016

Most intervals between linked visual and auditory stimuli are so brief as to be imperceptible. A new study has found that we can glean distance information from these minimally discrepant arrival times nonetheless.

Continue Reading

Can we unconsciously ‘hear’ distance?

Can we unconsciously ‘hear’ distance?

October 28, 2015

Because sound travels much more slowly than light, we can often see distant events before we hear them. That is why we can count the seconds between a lightning flash and its accompanying thunder. Now researchers in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences have shown that our brains can also detect and process sound delays that are too short to be noticed consciously, and that we use that information to fine tune what our eyes see when estimating distance.

Continue Reading

How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

How understanding GPS can help you hit a curveball

June 22, 2015

Our brains track moving objects by applying one of the algorithms your phone’s GPS uses, according to researchers at the University of Rochester. This same algorithm also explains why we are fooled by several motion-related optical illusions, including the sudden “break” of baseball’s well known “curveball illusion.”

Continue Reading

Action video game lovers learn faster and better: study

Action video game lovers learn faster and better: study

November 10, 2014

Players of fast-paced action games like “Call of Duty” and “Titanfall” become better learners than those who play slower games, new research shows. The study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, identified a “surprisingly broad transfer of performance enhancements” in subjects assigned to play several dozen hours of action games over nine weeks. “In order to sharpen its prediction skills, our brains constantly build models, or ‘templates,’ of the world,” explained the University of Rochester’s Daphne Bevelier in a news release.

Continue Reading